Announcements

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October Monthly Meeting

posted Sep 17, 2018, 6:19 AM by MC Prentice

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, October 2, 2018, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 De Soto Park Drive. We encourage you to bring a snack to share.

Please join us as we welcome Dr. Willet Boyer as he presents De Soto Didn't Sleep Here: The Archaeology of Three Timucuan Chiefdoms and the Exposure of an Archaeological Hoax:

The Marion County region of northern central Florida was the location of three of the Timucuan chiefdoms - Ocale, Potano and Acuera - referred to in accounts of the Hernando de Soto entrada, as well as several seventeenth-century mission sites. Claims were made in the popular press in 2012 that the so-called "White Ranch Site", 8MR3538, in this region represented the early contact and mission-era site of Potano. Long-term research at the Hutto/Martin Site (8MR3447) and the Richardson Site (8AL100) has confirmed that these sites represent genuine early contact and mission sites, while archaeological study at the purported "White Ranch Site" revealed no precontact, early contact, or mission-era site ever existed there. The results of study at these and other sites will be presented, and avenues for future long-term research in this region discussed.

 


See you in the fall!

posted Jun 6, 2018, 5:51 AM by MC Prentice

We are currently on summer hiatus and will begin the 2018/2019 season in early September.  Check back here as the time draws near for details on our Fall Kick-Off.  Thanks for a great season and have a fun, safe summer!

June Monthly Meeting

posted May 4, 2018, 5:46 AM by MC Prentice

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, June 5, 2018, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 De Soto Park Drive. We encourage you to bring a snack to share.

Please join us we welcome Dr. Keith Ashley of the University of North Florida.  Keith will be presenting:

Commemorating the Past and Engaging the Mississippian Present: St. Johns II (AD 900-1250) life in Northeastern Florida

 

Over the past 15 years, the University of North Florida has tested a series of St. Johns II sites along the lower (northern) St. Johns River and on nearby Atlantic coastal islands. Of upmost importance has been our research at the Mill Cove Complex and the Grand Shell Ring.  Although contemporaneous, Mill Cove has yielded extensive evidence of participation in far-flung early Mississippian interaction networks, whereas Grand appears more insular. The occupants of Grand, however, constructed a large shell ring reminiscent of Late Archaic monuments, perhaps as a way to commemorate the ancient past. This presentation reviews our work at both sites. 

May Monthly Meeting

posted Apr 16, 2018, 7:12 AM by MC Prentice   [ updated Apr 24, 2018, 4:27 AM ]

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, May 1, 2018, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 De Soto Park Drive. We encourage you to bring a snack to share.

Please join us as we congratulate the Louis Tesar Essay Contest winner, Emilee McGann! Emilee will be presenting her winning essay "Florida's Cultural and Historical Resources: What We've Learned, What We've Earned, and What We May Lose" 

The people of Florida have put great emphasis on historic conservation and archaeological site preservation for the past century. Namely, efforts have been for the purpose of preserving common heritage and economic growth. However, as climate change and sea-level rise progress, many historic and archaeological sites in Florida are at great risk of being lost, damaged, or destroyed. Join me as we explore what we’ve learned and what we’ve earned as a result of past preservation efforts, and what we may lose if we do not prepare for the threat climate change presents. 

April Monthly Meeting

posted Mar 23, 2018, 1:17 PM by MC Prentice

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, April 3, 2018, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 De Soto Park Drive. We encourage you to bring a snack to share.
Please join us as we welcome Bureau of Archaeological Research's Nicholas Yarborough as he discusses his research at the Spanish mission site, Mission San Damian de Escambe.

An Overview of Past Excavations, Interpretations, and Current Questions at 8LE120, Mission San Damian de Escambe

 

Mission San Damian de Escambe was founded in 1639 after the chief of the village of Escambe, also known as Cupaica, was baptized in St. Augustine. It was home to hundreds of families during the peak of the mission period in Apalachee territory. In 1704, this mission met the same fate as the rest of the missions of Florida when they were destroyed by forces marshaled by James Moore. B. Calvin Jones first identified the site in 1968 during a survey of proposed borrow pits slated for use in the construction of Interstate 10. As construction of the interstate continued, burials were revealed by nearby workers using an excavating machine. Jones mapped all 143 burials, excavated 42 of them, but fully recorded only five. He also noted the locations of numerous postmolds around the burials and interpreted them as markers or dividers within a cemetery. In 2013, 8LE120 was tested again by BAR archaeologist Jerry Lee who excavated some of the postmolds, used GPR to identify and test anomalies, and performed shovel testing to the west of what Jones had originally excavated. In addition to the historical background of the site, this presentation will explore the archaeology of 8LE120, re-examining the features, artifacts, and previous interpretations of the site, and will propose questions for future research. 

Wonderful Opportunity!

posted Mar 7, 2018, 6:31 AM by MC Prentice


Silent Auction and Rummage Sale!

posted Mar 1, 2018, 5:28 AM by MC Prentice


March Monthly Meeting and Silent Auction/Rummage Sale!

posted Feb 12, 2018, 6:58 AM by MC Prentice   [ updated Mar 1, 2018, 5:20 AM ]

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, March 6, the first Tuesday of the month, at 6:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 De Soto Park Drive. 
Please note our meeting will begin one hour earlier than usual so folks have a chance to purchase rummage sale items and place bids on silent auction items. Lecture will begin at 7 pm.

Please join us as we welcome Josh Goodwin of the Bureau of Archaeological Research

“Flocking to the Solstice: An Analysis of Avian Remains from a Civic-Ceremonial Center on the Florida Gulf Coast”

 

Recent excavations at Shell Mound (8LV42), a civic-ceremonial center on the northern Gulf Coast of Florida, have revealed many pit features with vertebrate faunal remains.  One such feature, a large, silo-shaped pit yielded a proportionately large number of skeletal elements identified to several species of waterbirds, a trait unique among contemporaneous sites reported within the area. The archaeological record of pre-Columbian cultures of the North American Southeast demonstrates the ritual importance of birds in the form of effigy pipes, copper and mica cutouts, and mortuary vessels that extend well into and beyond the first millennium A.D. Given the spatial and temporal relationship of Shell Mound with a large mortuary facility (Palmetto Mound), and the relationship of the faunal contents with recurring iconographic characters of this time period, the faunal assemblage from Feature 25 should be expected to represent practices outside of everyday subsistence. Based upon the presence of juvenile white ibis elements, which offer a proxy for the timing of capture for this apparently ritually charged class of animal, the presence of waterbird elements recovered in this context are proposed to represent ritualized deposition coinciding with events surrounding the summer solstice.

 

February Monthly Meeting-change of venue!

posted Jan 23, 2018, 10:29 AM by MC Prentice   [ updated Jan 23, 2018, 10:31 AM ]

Please note, our February monthly meeting will take place on Thursday, February 1, the first Thursday of the month and will be held at Mission San Luis, 2100 W Tennessee St, Tallahassee, FL 32304.  A wine and cheese reception will begin at 6 pm followed by this month's presentation at 6:30.

PAST and Mission San Luis are joining together to welcome Dr. John Worth of the University of West Florida.

In 1992, the discovery of the Emanuel Point I shipwreck in Pensacola Bay marked the first direct archaeological trace of the 1559-1561 colonial expedition of don Tristán de Luna y Arellano to Florida, the landing site of which had long been suspected to be somewhere on Pensacola Bay.  In 2006, further survey by the University of West Florida resulted in the discovery of the Emanuel Point II wreck just four hundred meters away.  And in 2015, the discovery of the Luna settlement site itself less than a kilometer away on the terrace overlooking both wrecks led to further archaeological survey and testing in 2016 and 2017, including two summer field schools at the 13-hectare site, along with the discovery of the Emanuel Point III wreck even closer to the shore.  As a result of these discoveries, archaeologists have been presented with an unprecedented opportunity to conduct long-term study on a huge if short-lived mid-16th-century Spanish colonial settlement with a cluster of at least three directly-associated shipwrecks just offshore.  The Luna archaeological district on Pensacola Bay promises to give us an unparalleled opportunity to explore both the colony itself and eventually as many as six of the ships that carried the colonists to Florida, and Dr. Worth's presentation will provide an update on current research into the settlement.


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