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Student Essay Contest

posted by Marie Prentice

Louis D. Tesar Historic Preservation Essay Contest

 

The Panhandle Archaeological Society at Tallahassee (PAST), a chapter of the Florida Anthropological Society, is holding an essay contest for a prize of $1000. Modeled on the Florida Anthropological Society annual student paper competition, the essay contest will be open to graduate and undergraduate students currently enrolled in a collegiate program in archaeology, history, or a related field. Students who wish to enter the contest must be enrolled in a college or university located in Florida or engaged in fieldwork in Florida.

 

Essays will address the question “What is the benefit of historic preservation and conservation of archaeological sites in Florida?” Essays will be 10-12 pages in length (plus references and images) and must be submitted by email to PASTessayContest@gmail.com by Monday, January 15, 2018. Top essay contestants will be asked to summarize their paper in a ten-minute oral presentation, to be given in Tallahassee during the June 5th meeting of PAST. A committee will judge the written essays and oral presentation on: quality of arguments and supporting data, overall contribution to our understanding of historic preservation in Florida, and overall presentation. With permission of the authors, the winning essay will be published on the PAST web site.

 

April Monthly Meeting

posted Mar 22, 2017, 4:10 AM by Marie Prentice

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, February 7, 2017, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 de Soto Park Drive. 

Please join us as we welcome Dr. Tanya Peres of FSU's Department of Anthropology. 

Black Cat Cave is a place Middle Tennessee locals told stories about for generations. It was rumored to have been the place of illicit activities and later family picnics. Little was really known about the cave until 2004, when evidence for ancient Native American activities were discovered buried inches below a twentieth century concrete slab. From 2014-2015 Dr. Peres worked on an assessment, salvage, and data collection project in collaboration with colleagues at Middle Tennessee State University, the City of Murfreesboro Parks and Recreation, and the Tennessee Division of Archaeology. This site, commonly referred to as Black Cat Cave (40RD299), is important to our understanding of how people used natural features on the landscape during the Archaic period of regional prehistory. 

Wakulla Springs Archaeology Day

posted Mar 17, 2017, 12:18 PM by Marie Prentice

Archaeology at Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park
Saturday, March 25
10 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Archaeology Festival
11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Tour field laboratory
What has been found at Wakulla Spring?
Artifacts on display
11:30-1:30
“Lunch With Archaeologists”
Bring picnic lunch/drink
All day:
See and taste food from way
back when
See how tools and ceramics were made
See an active archaeological dig
Program Free With Park Admission
Sponsored in part by Aucilla Research Institute, Panhandle Archaeological Society at
Tallahassee (PAST), Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park

March monthly meeting

posted Feb 23, 2017, 12:17 PM by Marie Prentice

March is archaeology month! We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, February 7, 2017, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 de Soto Park Drive. Come celebrate archaeology month with us and feel free to bring a snack to share.

We will be welcoming Dr. Paulette McFadden of the Bureau of Archaeological Research. Dr. McFadden explores the relationship between Pre-Columbian coastal residents on the northern Gulf Coast of Florida and their environment.  Using a multidisciplinary approach, research in the Horseshoe Cove area of the Big Bend revealed ancient strategies for navigating sea-level change and the impact of the earliest community on their local environment.  Shifts in patterns of activity in the area suggest social and cultural factors may have outweighed environmental factors during the later Pre-Columbian occupation. 

Lecture Thursday, February 23 at Mission San Luis

posted Feb 23, 2017, 9:39 AM by Marie Prentice   [ updated Feb 23, 2017, 9:40 AM ]


Upcoming Event

posted Feb 2, 2017, 10:07 AM by Marie Prentice


Event at Mission San Luis Thursday, January 19

posted Jan 18, 2017, 4:10 AM by Marie Prentice

“Middens, Mounds, and Mortuary Cults: The Archaeology of the Byrd Hammock Site” will be the title of a presentation by Jeffrey Shanks, given tomorrow evening at Mission San Luis. There will be a reception beginning at 6:00pm, with the presentation scheduled to begin at 6:30pm.

From Mission San Luis: “Although we are sorry to announce that David Hurst Thomas had to cancel his appearance for medical reasons, we are very excited to welcome Jeffrey Shanks in his place. Jeffrey will speak about the history of Byrd Hammock, a prehistoric complex of burial mounds and villages that were in use from ca. AD 400 to 900 and occupied by the people from the Swift Creek and Weeden Island cultures. His illustrated talk will cover the results of the recent excavations which are beginning to shed new light on the lifeways and ceremonial practices of these ancient people.

Jeffrey Shanks is an archaeologist with the National Park Service and field director for the recent archaeological excavations at the Byrd Hammock Site in Wakulla County. Jeffrey is an expert on the Woodland Period archaeology of North Florida and has authored and co-authored a number of articles and papers on the subject, including a chapter in the recent book "New Histories of Pre-Columbian Florida." Jeffrey and his colleagues were awarded the 2016 Outstanding Achievement in Archaeology from the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation for their work at the Byrd Hammock Site.

Come meet Mr. Shanks at a reception starting at 6:00 p.m. The lecture is scheduled to start at 6:30.”

 

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February Monthly Meeting

posted Jan 6, 2017, 11:54 AM by Marie Prentice

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, February 7, 2017, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 de Soto Park Drive. 

Please join us as we welcome Dr. Neill Wallis of the Florida Museum of Natural History.

Deciphering the Social Networks of Woodland Period Northern Florida

 

Beginning about 1800 years ago, there is ample archaeological evidence that communities in the area of present-day northern Florida and southern Georgia were connected by frequent inter-site travel and exchange. This presentation will describe how sourcing of “Swift Creek” and “Weeden Island” pottery from several dozen sites gives insight into what these interactions might have entailed and how they may have shaped the Woodland period social landscape.

January Monthly Meeting

posted Dec 7, 2016, 4:48 AM by Marie Prentice   [ updated Jan 3, 2017, 6:37 AM by Julie Duggins ]

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, January 3, 2017, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 de Soto Park Drive. 
Please join us as we welcome special guest Dr. Keith Ashley of the University of North Florida who will discuss: 

Commemorating the Past and Engaging the Mississippian Present: St. Johns II (AD 900-1250) Life in Northeastern Florida 
Over the past 15 years, the University of North Florida has tested a series of St. Johns II sites along the lower (northern) St. Johns River and on nearby Atlantic coastal islands. Of utmost importance has been our research at the Mill Cove Complex and the Grand Shell Ring.  Although contemporaneous, Mill Cove has yielded extensive evidence of participation in far-flung early Mississippian interaction networks, whereas Grand appears more insular. The occupants of Grand, however, constructed a large shell ring reminiscent of Late Archaic monuments, perhaps as a way to commemorate the ancient past. This presentation reviews our work at both sites.

 

December Monthly Meeting

posted Nov 17, 2016, 5:39 AM by Marie Prentice

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, December 6, 2016, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 de Soto Park Drive. This will be our holiday meeting and we encourage members to bring a festive holiday treat to share.

Please join us as we welcome Dr. Jason O'Donoughue of the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research as he presents:

A secret and a lovely place…” The Past and Future of Florida’s Springs 

Florida houses the largest concentration of artesian springs in the world, many of which are besieged by the impacts of development. Debate rages over how best to balance conservation, recreation, and sustainable groundwater use. Despite their abundance, relatively little is known about past human use of these places. Histories of springs typically emphasize their role as watering holes where game and freshwater could be obtained or as sacred pools where ritual was conducted. However, recent archaeological investigations at several springs in the state are casting new light on these interpretations. Drawing on examples from the St. Johns River valley, I outline the environmental and cultural history of Florida’s springs and argue that archaeology can help us better understand contemporary threats to these places and enhance efforts to conserve and restore what Archie Carr called “the singular blessing of the Florida landscape”.

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