Announcements

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Summer Hiatus

posted Jun 7, 2017, 4:38 AM by Marie Prentice

We are currently on summer hiatus.  Please plan on joining us for our Fall Kickoff on Tuesday, September 5.  We'll keep you updated on volunteer opportunities as we receive information.  Thanks for a great season and have a great summer!

Congratulatons, Lonnie!

posted Jun 1, 2017, 5:44 AM by Marie Prentice

A hearty congratulations to PAST Membership Director Lonnie Mann!  Lonnie was recently awarded the Individual Distinguished Service Award by the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation at their annual awards ceremony in St. Petersburg, FL. Lonnie's tireless dedication to preserving the past for the future is an inspiration to all of us.  Way to go, Lonnie!

June Monthly Meeting

posted May 24, 2017, 4:42 AM by Marie Prentice

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, June 6, 2017, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 de Soto Park Drive. This will be out last monthly meeting before our summer hiatus. 
Please join us as we welcome Dr. Jessi Halligan of the FSU Department of Anthropology as she discusses her groundbreaking work at the Page-Ladson site.

 Black Waters and Foggy Origins: How Florida Can Contribute to the Story of the First Americans

Much recent research has suggested that the first Americans, called Paleoindians, arrived in the New World sometime between 21,000 and 15,000 years ago, before the appearance of the Clovis complex, dated to around 13,000 calendar years ago. For 50 years, dominant paradigms suggested that Clovis people were first in the Americas. Archaeological sites from the Paleoindian (ca. 16,000-11,500 years ago) period are extremely rare and poorly-preserved in most of North America, making it difficult to understand when and how the Americas were colonized and also to understand Paleoindian lifeways. Florida’s Aucilla River basin is the exception. Hundreds of Paleoindian artifacts have been found in submerged sinkholes within this river, including the Page-Ladson site, which contains the remains of mastodon butchery on the edge of a small pond dating to 14,500 years ago, more than a thousand years older than Clovis. This site has profound implications for our understanding of early American origins and lifeways. 

Tallahassee Trust for Historic Preservation Awards

posted May 19, 2017, 11:33 AM by Marie Prentice

Congratulations to Lonnie Mann and Louis Tesar for their recent recognition by the Tallahassee Trust for Historic Preservation! Lonnie and Louis were each recognized for their selfless contributions to the fields of archaeology and historic preservation. Way to go!

May Monthly Meeting

posted Apr 25, 2017, 5:06 AM by Marie Prentice

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, February 7, 2017, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 de Soto Park Drive.

Please join us as we welcome BAR underwater section supervisor Dr. Ryan Duggins who will be discussing his current research at a submerged archaic-period cemetery located near Venice Beach, Florida.

Student Essay Contest

posted Mar 27, 2017, 4:16 AM by Marie Prentice

Louis D. Tesar Historic Preservation Essay Contest

 

The Panhandle Archaeological Society at Tallahassee (PAST), a chapter of the Florida Anthropological Society, is holding an essay contest for a prize of $1000. Modeled on the Florida Anthropological Society annual student paper competition, the essay contest will be open to graduate and undergraduate students currently enrolled in a collegiate program in archaeology, history, or a related field. Students who wish to enter the contest must be enrolled in a college or university located in Florida or engaged in fieldwork in Florida.

 

Essays will address the question “What is the benefit of historic preservation and conservation of archaeological sites in Florida?” Essays will be 10-12 pages in length (plus references and images) and must be submitted by email to PASTessayContest@gmail.com by Monday, January 15, 2018. Top essay contestants will be asked to summarize their paper in a ten-minute oral presentation, to be given in Tallahassee during the June 5th meeting of PAST. A committee will judge the written essays and oral presentation on: quality of arguments and supporting data, overall contribution to our understanding of historic preservation in Florida, and overall presentation. With permission of the authors, the winning essay will be published on the PAST web site.

 

April Monthly Meeting

posted Mar 22, 2017, 4:10 AM by Marie Prentice

We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, February 7, 2017, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 de Soto Park Drive. 

Please join us as we welcome Dr. Tanya Peres of FSU's Department of Anthropology. 

Black Cat Cave is a place Middle Tennessee locals told stories about for generations. It was rumored to have been the place of illicit activities and later family picnics. Little was really known about the cave until 2004, when evidence for ancient Native American activities were discovered buried inches below a twentieth century concrete slab. From 2014-2015 Dr. Peres worked on an assessment, salvage, and data collection project in collaboration with colleagues at Middle Tennessee State University, the City of Murfreesboro Parks and Recreation, and the Tennessee Division of Archaeology. This site, commonly referred to as Black Cat Cave (40RD299), is important to our understanding of how people used natural features on the landscape during the Archaic period of regional prehistory. 

Wakulla Springs Archaeology Day

posted Mar 17, 2017, 12:18 PM by Marie Prentice

Archaeology at Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park
Saturday, March 25
10 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Archaeology Festival
11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Tour field laboratory
What has been found at Wakulla Spring?
Artifacts on display
11:30-1:30
“Lunch With Archaeologists”
Bring picnic lunch/drink
All day:
See and taste food from way
back when
See how tools and ceramics were made
See an active archaeological dig
Program Free With Park Admission
Sponsored in part by Aucilla Research Institute, Panhandle Archaeological Society at
Tallahassee (PAST), Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park

March monthly meeting

posted Feb 23, 2017, 12:17 PM by Marie Prentice

March is archaeology month! We will hold our next meeting on Tuesday, February 7, 2017, the first Tuesday of the month, at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Governor Martin House. The Center is located off Lafayette Street, between Seminole Drive and Myers Park Drive, at 1001 de Soto Park Drive. Come celebrate archaeology month with us and feel free to bring a snack to share.

We will be welcoming Dr. Paulette McFadden of the Bureau of Archaeological Research. Dr. McFadden explores the relationship between Pre-Columbian coastal residents on the northern Gulf Coast of Florida and their environment.  Using a multidisciplinary approach, research in the Horseshoe Cove area of the Big Bend revealed ancient strategies for navigating sea-level change and the impact of the earliest community on their local environment.  Shifts in patterns of activity in the area suggest social and cultural factors may have outweighed environmental factors during the later Pre-Columbian occupation. 

Lecture Thursday, February 23 at Mission San Luis

posted Feb 23, 2017, 9:39 AM by Marie Prentice   [ updated Feb 23, 2017, 9:40 AM ]


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