Future Directions in Road Safety Research
 
The documents on this page were developed by the Future Directions subcommittee, which is part of the Transportation Research Board's Highway Safety Performance committee.
 
TRB Circular E-C179: Theory, Explanation, and Prediction in Road Safety: Promising Directions. J. Bonneson and J. Ivan.  This document summarizes the discussion and describes the program of advanced safety research identified by the participants at the FHWA workshop held on November 20 and 21, 2008. REPORT
 
Theory, Explanation, and Prediction in Road Safety: Indentification of Promising Directions and a Plan for Advancement.  On November 20 and 21, 2008, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) co-sponsored a workshop titled “Future Directions in Highway Crash Data Modeling.”  The objectives of the workshop were to: (1) explore promising future directions in highway crash data modeling and (2) develop a program of advanced research to provide a theoretic foundation for explaining crash causation.  Through breakout groups and plenary sessions, the participants were asked to identify critical issues and challenges, explore alternative modeling approaches and concepts, and identify the most promising new directions for explaining the contributing causes of crashes.  This document represents a draft summary of the workshop discussion and a description of the program of advanced safety research formulated by the participants. WORKSHOP SUMMARY
 
Future Directions in Highway Crash Data Modeling. Presentation made by J. Bonneson at the November 2008 workshop described above. SLIDES
 
Research Needs Statements to Advance The Science of Road Safety.  Statements prepared for NCHRP Project 20-7/279 Work Plan to Develop the 2nd Edition of the Highway Safety Manual. REPORT
 
White Paper No. 3 - Theory, Explanation, and Prediction in Road Safety: Indentification of Promising Directions and a Plan for Advancement. The objective of this white paper is to highlight the issues and challenges associated with past and present methods used to develop tools for road safety evaluation. This paper provides some thoughts on the current state of the practice in safety model development and makes a case that further advancement in this area will require a stronger reliance on the theoretic principles that underlie crash causation. The paper summarizes four emerging areas of highway safety research that are intended to improve the reliability of models for predicting crash frequency and severity, and to explain causal effects. PAPER