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Chasteleyn


This article focuses on the medieval family of Le Chasteleyn originally from the county of Suffolk.  However, the branch of my interest follows the descent of the manor of Trent, co. Somerset.  It ends with the marriage of the heiress Joan Le Chasteleyn who brought Trent to her third husband, John Manyngford.


Gilbert Le Chasteleyn is the earliest known member of the family. [1]  The name is usually found with the prefix Le, though occasionally De, and is assumed to be an occupational surname as opposed to a place name.  It is derived from castellan or châtelain from the medieval latin castellānus – the keeper, commander or governor of a castle. [2] Presumably, an early ancestor was the governor of a castle and so obtained the name.  It should be noted though that the Chasteleyn family owned the manor of Castelyns, co. Suffolk, and so it cannot be said with certainty whether the name of the manor or the name of the family came first. [3, 4]

Gilbert’s place in the family is known from the autobiography of the Sir Simonds D'Ewes written in the 1640’s. [5, 6]  A noted antiquary, he stated that he had the original Chasteleyn records in his possession. He was reporting on his wife’s ancestry and cited as his evidence for Gilbert two deeds.  He supposes these deeds to date to about the reign of Stephen or of Henry II.  Based on him having an adult great-grandson in 1285, it is certainly possible the deeds date to Henry II, though the reign of Stephen is probably a little too early.  The descent outlined by Sir Simonds D'Ewes matches the descent given in an agreement between two descendants of Gilbert Le Chasteleyn (this Gilbert’s grandson). [7]


1. Also Chastelyn, Chasteleyn, Chastilain, Castalanus, Castelanus, Casteleyn, Chastelleyn, Chastillon, Chastlelleyn, Chastellein, Chastellon, Castilayn
2. Wikipedia article on châtelain.  http://tinyurl.com/5u8oqb4
3.  The Manors of Suffolk: The Hundreds of Babergh and Blackbourn, by Walter Arthur Copinger, Harold Bernard Copinger (1905). P. 113 
http://tinyurl.com/4tp4lgh
4.  West Suffolk, by H. R. Barker (1907). P. 155 
http://tinyurl.com/49fskeq
5.  The Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir Simonds D'Ewes (d. 1650), Bart., Vol. 1, by Sir Simonds D'Ewes, ed. by James Halliwell (1845). p. 343, 415  http://tinyurl.com/4sz6ca6 
6. The Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir Simonds D'Ewes (d. 1650), Bart., Vol. 2, by Sir Simonds D'Ewes, ed. by James Halliwell (1845). p. 52 
http://tinyurl.com/4k8tkxr
7.
Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 19-20 (1874 & 1875). ‘Trent’ by John Batten (in vol. 20, p. 113-139, see p. 123) http://tinyurl.com/24b9g7q


Alan Le Chasteleyn, like his father, is known from the autobiography of Sir Simonds D'Ewes written in the 1640’s.  [1]  He was writing from deeds then in his possession; it is not known if these deeds still exist.  Simonds D'Ewes says that Alan is called ‘Alan de Chastelain’ and also ‘Alanus Castelanus de Waldingfield.’  This indicates that the family at one time was possibly from Waldingfield, co. Suffolk, not far from from the manor of Castelyn (in Groton).  

1. The Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir Simonds D'Ewes (d. 1650), Bart., Vol. 1, by Sir Simonds D'Ewes, ed. by James Halliwell (1845). p. 343, 415  http://tinyurl.com/4sz6ca6

 

Sir Gilbert Le Chasteleyn
Born: Before 1244
Died: 22 Edward I (1293-1294).
Married: Agnes

Sir Gilbert Le Chasteleyn is the son Alan Le Chasteleyn and the grandson of another Gilbert Le Chasteleyn. [1]  This comes from the autobiography of Sir Simonds D'Ewes written in the 1640’s when he was reporting on his wife’s ancestry.  The descent, according to Simonds D’Ewes, was proven by deeds he possessed at the time.  The father Alan was called  Alanus de Castelanus de Waldingfield, and so it was supposed that he was originally from Waldingfield, co. Suffolk.  The grandfather Gilbert was a witness to deeds thought to date to the time of King Stephen or Henry II.  As a rough estimate of birth, his son Alan was of age in 1285 when he jointly purchased Trent with his father, making Alan born by 1264 and Gilbert likely born by and probably well before 1244.

The descent of our concern follows the manor of Trent, co. Somerset.  An agreement between two of his great-great grandchildren concerning the inheritance of Gilbert Le Chasteleyn proves the descent down to Joan Le Chasteleyn. [2]  This manor came to William de Braose who on his death in 1230 left 4 daughters and coheiressess, Isabel, Maud, Eleanor and Eve. The manor of Trent was divided between Eve, Maud and Eleanor as 1/3 shares. Eve and her husband William de Cantilupe gave their 1/3 share to the Priory of Sudley.  It is the 1/3 portion held by Eleanor and her husband Humphrey de Bohun which came to the Le Chasteleyn family.  Humphrey de Bohun apparently sold their share of Trent to Robert de Seford and Matilda his wife to be held of Humphrey de Bohun, and subsequently of the Earls of Hereford.

In 13 Edward I (1284-1285), Gilbert Le Chasteleyn jointly with his son Alan purchased the share of Trent from Robert de Seford and Matilda. [3]  The original deed has apparently been lost but references to this original give the date of purchase as 13 Edward I.  It is reaffirmed in the Somerset of Feet of Fines in March 1286 where by Robert de Seford and Matilda his wife gave to Gilbert Le Chastelein for the sum of one penny yearly, and for this Gilbert gave them ‘one sore sparrow hawk.’ [4]  These amounts, essentially a gift rather than a sale, raise the possibility that Gilbert or his son Alan had married a daughter of Robert and Matilda.  It may also be that as they were just recording an agreement which had already been paid for two years before.  Alan Le Chasteleyn was still holding Trent of Robert de Seford and Maud in his IPM of 1324. [5]

According to Sir Simonds D'Ewes, Gilbert was married to Agnes, whose ancestry he was not able to discover. [6]

Gilbert Le Chasteleyn died 22 Edward I (1293-1294). [7, 8]

Children of Gilbert Le Chasteleyn and Agnes:

1. Alan Le Chasteleyn. See next.
2. Thomas Le Chasteleyn.  Died 1331.  He was the ancestor of Joan Le Chasteleyn who married Sir Robert Knyvet.  The descent from Gilbert to Joan as given in the agreement with her cousin goes Gilbert-Thomas-William-John-Joan.


1. The Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir Simonds D'Ewes (d. 1650), Bart., Vol. 1, by Sir Simonds D'Ewes, ed. by James Halliwell (1845). p. 343  http://tinyurl.com/4sz6ca6
2. Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 19-20 (1874 & 1875).  ‘Trent’ by John Batten (in vol. 20, p. 113-139, see p. 123) http://tinyurl.com/24b9g7q
3. 
Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 19-20 (1874 & 1875). ‘Trent’ by John Batten (in vol. 20, p. 113-139, see p. 122) http://tinyurl.com/24b9g7q
4.
Pedes Finium, Commonly Called Feet of Fines, for the County of Somerset, Richard I to Edward I (1196-1307). Ed. by Emmanuel Green (1892). Somerset Record Society, vol. VI. p. 269, no. 100. http://tinyurl.com/4dv8yyq
5.
Calendar of Inquisitions Port Mortem, Vol. 6 (10-20 Edward II, 1316-1327). p. 274 no. 459. http://tinyurl.com/4w4nom7 
6
. The Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir Simonds D'Ewes (d. 1650), Bart., Vol. 1, by Sir Simonds D'Ewes, ed. by James Halliwell (1845). p. 343  http://tinyurl.com/4sz6ca6
7.  The Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir Simonds D'Ewes (d. 1650), Bart., Vol. 1, by Sir Simonds D'Ewes, ed. by James Halliwell (1845). p. 343  http://tinyurl.com/4sz6ca6
8.  West Suffolk, by H. R. Barker (1907). P. 155 
http://tinyurl.com/49fskeq

 

Alan Le Chasteleyn
Born: Bef. 1265
Died: Shortly before 6 March 1324

Alan Le Chasteleyn was apparently the younger son of Gilbert Le Chasteleyn by his wife Agnes.  He would have been of age when in 13 Edward I (1284-1285) when he with his father jointly purchased 1/3 of the manor of Trent, co. Somerset. [1]  This gives him a birth date of before 1265.  It appears his brother Thomas was the primary heir of their father, and the purchase of Trent likely represents Gilbert providing for his younger son.

His ancestry and descent is proven by an agreement dated 10 May 1400 in which his great-granddaughter came to an agreement with her cousin regarding land in Trent near Yeovil, co Somerset.  In it she is named as Joan wife of John Manyngford and daughter of Thomas son of Thomas son of Alan son of Gilbert Le Chasteleyn. [2]

In the 1303 Feudal Aids, Alan Le Chasteleyn is found holding Trent with Henry de Wolavyngton who held one of the other 1/3 shares of Trent; the 1/3 share held by the Priory of Stodley is not mentioned.  In 1316, the 1/3 shares of Trente were held by Alanus Chastelein, Henrucus de Woll(av)ynton, and the Prior of  Stodley. [3]

Alan Le Chasteleyn died shortly before 6 March 1324 when a writ of diem clausit extremum was issued. [4]  It should be noted that the writ went out to the sheriffs of Somerset, Dorset, Devon and Cornwall indicating he probably held property in those counties.  His subsequent IPM in Somerset shows him holding the manor of Trent of Robert and Maud de Seford. [5]  His heir was his son Thomas aged 23 years.

1. Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 19-20 (1874 & 1875). ‘Trent’ by John Batten (in vol. 20, p. 113-139, see p. 122) http://tinyurl.com/24b9g7q
2. Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 19-20 (1874 & 1875). ‘Trent’ by John Batten (in vol. 20, p. 113-139, see p. 123) http://tinyurl.com/24b9g7q
3. Feudal Aids: Inquisitions and Assessments Relating to Feudal Aids: vol. 4 Northampton-Somerset. P. 299,322  http://tinyurl.com/49o4roo
4.  CFR Vol. 3 (1912; reprint 1971), Edward II, A.D. 1319-1327  p. 258 
http://tinyurl.com/4wbz982
5.
Calendar of Inquisitions Port Mortem, Vol 6 (10-20 Edward II, 1316-1327). p. 274 http://tinyurl.com/4w4nom7   no. 459. Alan de Chastillun.

 

Thomas Le Chasteleyn
Born: c1301
Died: Between
8 February 1334 and 1346
Married: Thomasina

Thomas Le Chasteleyn, son of Alan Le Chasteleyn, was born c 1301 as he was 23 years old in the IPM of his father dated 28 May 1324.  He is named in the May 1400 agreement regarding land in Trent by his granddaughter as the son of Alan Le Chasteleyn, father of Thomas, and grandfather of Joan Manyngford. [2]

He was married to Thomasina, the daughter of Alice de Cantilupe; her father and so her maiden name is unknown.  She is named in a suit in 1389 where her granddaughter Joan is said to be the rightful heir of John de Cauntelowe. [3]  The descent given was “Joan, wife of John Maynford, as cousin and heir of the aforesaid John Cauntelowe, viz. daughter of Thomas the son of Thomasia daughter of Alice daughter of Richard brother of Robert father of Richard father of the aforesaid John Cauntelou.”

He was living in 8 February 1334 when he presented to the church at Trent jointly with the Prior of Stodley and Thomas West. [4, 5]  However, he was dead by 1346 when, in Feudal Aids, Trent was found to be held by Thomasina who was the widow of Thomas Chastelyn.  This is repeated in the 1428 inquisition. [6, 7] 


1.
Calendar of Inquisitions Port Mortem, Vol 6 (10-20 Edward II, 1316-1327). p. 274 http://tinyurl.com/4w4nom7   no. 459. Alan de Chastillun.
2. Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 19-20 (1874 & 1875).  ‘Trent’ by John Batten (in vol. 20, p. 113-139, see p. 123) http://tinyurl.com/24b9g7q
3. Year Books of Richard II: 13 Richard II, ed. by Theodore F. T. Plucknett (1929) p. 24-36  http://tinyurl.com/46d2smy
4. 
Somerset Incumbents: From the Hugo mss. 30, 279- So. in the British Museum, ed. by Frederic William Weaver   p. 200-201 http://tinyurl.com/4lsorft 
5. The Register of Ralph of Shrewsbury, Bishop of Bath and Wells vol. I, ed. by Thomas Scott Holmes. Somerset Record Society, vol. IX (1896). p. 162, xl 
http://tinyurl.com/49tdf5y
6. Feudal Aids: Inquisitions and Assessments Relating to Feudal Aids: vol. 4 Northampton-Somerset. P. 342, 375  http://tinyurl.com/49o4roo 
7.  See
‘John Botreaux of Trent and his Chantry,’ by the Rev. Prebendary E.H. Bates Harbin. Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 63 (1918). http://tinyurl.com/4qgn95p for an explanation of how John Botreaux came to hold the Chasteleyn portion of Trent.

 

Thomas Le Chasteleyn
Born: Estimated between 1320 and 1330
Dead: Before 28 February 1361
Married: Isabel

Thomas Le Chasteleyn was the son of Thomas Le Chasteleyn and Thomasina.  To give an estimate of his birth date, his father was born c 1301 so it is reasonable to assume this Thomas was born after 1320; his daughter and heir was born in 1349 so he was likely born before 1330. [1, 2]

His place in the Chasteleyn pedigree is shown by an agreement his daughter Joan made regarding the descent of Trent where by Joan Chasteleyn, wife of John Manyngford, dau. of Thomas son of Thomas son of Alan son of Gilbert Le Chasteleyn came to an agreement with her cousin Joan Chasteleyn, wife of Robert Knyvet, dau. of John son of William son of Thomas son of Gilbert Le Chasteleyn. [3]  He was also mentioned in a suit regarding a Cantelo inheritance (given more fully below) where Joan Maynford  was called the daughter of Thomas. [4]

He was married to Isabel as shown by the Proof of Age of his daughter and heir, Joan. [5]  It needs to be noted that the mother of Joan is frequently and incorrectly stated to be Emma de Cantelo, daughter and heir of John de Cantelo of Chilton Cantelo.  [6, 7]  It is certainly true that Joan was the heir of Emma de Cantelo. [8] However, in all the records Joan is called kinsman or cousin of Emma.  Also, Joan was born in 1349 while Emma was born 1344, making this error all the more inexplicable. [9, 10]  The correct connection of Thomas and his daughter Joan to the Cantilupe family of Chilton Cantelo is given in a 1389 suit where “Joan, wife of John Maynford, as cousin and heir of the aforesaid John Cauntelowe, viz. daughter of Thomas the son of Thomasia daughter of Alice daughter of Richard brother of Robert father of Richard father of the aforesaid John Cauntelou.” [11]  Note that the John de Cauntelowe of the suit (d. 1389) is different from the John de Cantelo of Chilton Cantelo (d. 1349).

He was dead by 18 February 1361 when King Edward III presented at Trent by reason of the minority of the heir of Thomas Chasteleyn. [12]


1. 
Calendar of Inquisitions Port Mortem, Vol 6 (10-20 Edward II, 1316-1327). p. 274 http://tinyurl.com/4w4nom7   no. 459. Alan de Chastillun.
2.  CIPM vol. XI p. 292. Proof of Age of Joan, daughter of Thomas Chastelayne made 3 July 1362.   http://tinyurl.com/2esk2xf 
3. 
Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 19-20 (1874 & 1875).  ‘Trent’ by John Batten (in vol. 20, p. 113-139, see p. 123) http://tinyurl.com/24b9g7q
4.  Year Books of Richard II: 13 Richard II, ed. by Theodore F. T. Plucknett (1929) p. 24-36  http://tinyurl.com/46d2smy
5.  CIPM vol. XI p. 292. Proof of Age of Joan, daughter of Thomas Chastelayne made 3 July 1362.   http://tinyurl.com/2esk2xf
6. 
Memorials of the West, by William Henry Hamilton Rogers (1888).  p. 377 http://tinyurl.com/29dwdok 
7. 
Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 19-20 (1874 & 1875).  ‘Trent’ by John Batten (in vol. 20, p. 113-139, see p. 122) http://tinyurl.com/24b9g7q
8. Cal. of the Close Rolls vol. 11 (1360-1364) (1909, reprint 1972). p. 365.  15 Nov. 1362 Joan, cousin and heir, to receive lands of Emma Cantelo http://tinyurl.com/25jmaov
9. CIPM vol. XI p. 292. Proof of Age of Joan, daughter of Thomas Chastelayne made 3 July 1362.   http://tinyurl.com/2esk2xf 
10.
CIPM vol. IX p. 171. IPM of John De Cauntelo  http://tinyurl.com/2c8skte
11. Year Books of Richard II: 13 Richard II, ed. by Theodore F. T. Plucknett (1929) p. 24-36  http://tinyurl.com/46d2smy|
12.
The Register of Ralph of Shrewsbury, Bishop of Bath and Wells vol. II, ed. by Thomas Scott Holmes. Somerset Record Society, vol. X (1896). p. 753.   http://tinyurl.com/47448sl

 

Joan Le Chasteleyn
Born:
15 March 1348 at Dinnington, co. Somerset.
Died: After 10 May 1400, before 1408
Married: 1st John Wyneet, 2nd Robert de Wyk, 3rd John Manyngford

Joan Le Chastelyn, daughter and heir of Thomas Le Chastelyn and Isabel, made her proof of age on 3 July 1362. [1]  She was born 15 March 1348 at Dunnington and baptized there at the church of St. Nicholas.  In the introduction says “the said Emma, mother [sic]of the same Joan whose heir Joan is” but again, obviously, she could not be the daughter of someone born in 1344.  The ‘sic’ added by the editor comes from the fact that throughout the testimony of the witnesses, the mother of Joan is called Isabel. 

Her Chasteleyn descent is laid out in a suit where by Joan Chasteleyn, wife of John Manyngford, dau. of Thomas son of Thomas son of Alan son of Gilbert Le Chasteleyn came to an agreement with her cousin Joan Chasteleyn, wife of Robert Knyvet, dau. of John son of William son of Thomas son of Gilbert Le Chasteleyn. [2]

Joan Le Chasteleyn was married three times.  From the IPM of Walter Park, we learn that “long before” the death of Walter Park in 1361 she had been married to John Wyneet. [3]  Walter Park was the husband of Joan’s cousin Emma de Cantelo, and held the manor of Chilton Cantelo by the courtesy of England until his death.  On his death, Chilton Cantelo passed to Joan Le Chasteleyn as cousin and heir of Emma. [4]  John Wyneet was dead by the time of this 1361 inquisition.  It should be noted that Joan is frequently and incorrectly called daughter and heir of Emma de Cantelo, heiress of Chilton Cantelo, [5, 6] when in fact she is a distant cousin and heir of Emma.

Sometime after the death of Walter Park (4 October 1361) and before the taking of his IPM on 14 February 1362, Joan was married to Robert De Wyk. [7]  From her Proof of Age, she would still have been only 13 years old and not yet of age.  However, on 31 March 1362 the Fine Rolls record the grant of the wardship of the marriage and lands of Joan to Robert De Wyk without mentioning that she was already married. [8]  As noted above, Joan proved her age on 3 July 1362 at which time Robert De Wyk held the custody of her lands, and here she is again called wife of Robert Wyke. [9]  On 8 February 1372 in the IPM of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, Robert de Wyk was holding a half fee in a third of the manor of Trent. [10, 11]  Robert de Wyk was still living on 22 December 1384 when he was noted as holding Trent in the partition and distribution of Humphrey de Bohun’s lands. [12]  In almost all the histories of the Wykes or Weeks family, Joan Chastelyn is given as a wife of Roger Wykes who died 1399 and whose effigy lies in Trent Church. [13, 14]  This would appear to be a much propagated error.

Certainly by 1389 Robert de Wykes was dead and Joan had remarried John Manyngford. In 8 Richard II, a suit was filed in which Joan wife of John Manyford was named as the heir John de Cauntilowe. [15] Note that this John de Cantelowe, husband of Alice, is apparently different from the John de Cantelo of Chilton Cantelo who died in 1349; Joan (Le Chasteleyn) Manyngford was the ultimate heir of two different John de Cantelo’s.

Joan Le Chasteleyn was last known living on 10 May 1400 when she with her husband John Manyngford reached an agreement with her cousin, also Joan Le Chastelyn, regarding land in Trent [16].  This agreement details her descent from Gilbert Chastelyn, to son Alan, to son Thomas, to son Thomas, to daughter Joan.  She must have been dead by 1408 as her son-in-law John Affeton held this portion of Trent. [17]


1. CIPM vol. XI p. 292. Proof of Age of Joan, daughter of Thomas Chastelayne made 3 July 1362.   http://tinyurl.com/2esk2xf
2. Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 19-20 (1874 & 1875).  ‘Trent’ by John Batten (in vol. 20, p. 113-139, see p. 123) http://tinyurl.com/24b9g7q
3. 
CIPM vol. XI p. 158. IPM of Walter Park http://tinyurl.com/22ok48l
4.
Cal. of the Close Rolls vol. 11 (1360-1364) (1909, reprint 1972). p. 365.  15 Nov. 1362 Joan, cousin and heir, to receive lands of Emma Cantelo http://tinyurl.com/25jmaov
5. 
Memorials of the West, by William Henry Hamilton Rogers (1888).  p. 377 http://tinyurl.com/29dwdok 
6. 
Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 19-20 (1874 & 1875). ‘Trent’ by John Batten (in vol. 20, p. 113-139, see p. 122) http://tinyurl.com/24b9g7q
7. 
CIPM vol. XI p. 158. IPM of Walter Park http://tinyurl.com/22ok48l
8. CFR vol. VII ( Ed. III 1356-1368) p. 215. 31 March 1362 Wardship of Joan Chasteleyn to Robert de Wyk http://tinyurl.com/2ar4lvz
9. CIPM vol. XI p. 292. Proof of Age of Joan, daughter of Thomas Chastelayne made 3 July 1362.   http://tinyurl.com/2esk2xf
10. Proceedings of Somersetshire Archeological and Natural History Society, vol. XX, 1874. Trent, by John Batten, F.S.A. p. 121. Google Books. http://tinyurl.com/2ct5csp
11. Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and Other Analogous Documents Preserved in the Public Record Office: Edward III (Google snippet view) http://tinyurl.com/29jdgvn
12. Cal. of the Close Rolls Richard II vol. II (1381-1385), (1914, reprint 1972). p. 515
http://tinyurl.com/4n4aspe
13.
Memorials of the West, by William Henry Hamilton Rogers (1888).  p. 377 http://tinyurl.com/29dwdok
14. Proceedings of Somersetshire Archeological and Natural History Society, vol. LXVII – 1921, p.37. (archive.org) http://tinyurl.com/297jtc3
15. Year Books of Richard II: 13 Richard II, ed. by Theodore F. T. Plucknett (1929) p. 24-36  http://tinyurl.com/46d2smy
16. Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 19-20 (1874 & 1875). ‘Trent’ by John Batten (in vol. 20, p. 113-139, see p. 123) http://tinyurl.com/24b9g7q
17. ‘John Botreaux of Trent and his Chantry,’ by the Rev. Prebendary E.H. Bates Harbin. Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol. 63 (1918).
http://tinyurl.com/4qgn95p

 


Additional References:
Transcript of 1390 suit 

Subpages (1): Bisenham v. Wyse
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