Community Partnerships

The Career Center is the hub for Farmington High School's engagement with the greater Farmington community. Provided below are some of the ways that businesses and other community organizations can partner with FHS to support student learning. Click on each option for more details about that type of partnership.

Career Fair - Visit the high school for 3-4 hours to speak with students individually and in small groups and give them a preliminary understanding of a job or career

The goal of a career fair is to expose students to a variety of careers during a single event. Career fairs require professionals to visit the high school during a designated time period to speak with students and potentially bring materials they can share with interested students. Career fairs generally occur during the school day and last anywhere from 2-4 hours.

Career/Capstone Interview - Participate in an interview with a student either on the phone or over Skype to answer their questions about a career field or questions related to their Capstone project

The goal of a career or Capstone interview is for students to have their questions about their Capstone project or a particular career answered by a professional in their field of interest. Participating in a career or Capstone interview requires the professional to dedicate approximately 30-60 minutes to answering students’ questions about their career interests and/or Capstone projects. These interviews can take place on the phone or over Skype (or another video conferencing platform). Students will have a set of questions generated for the interview and can share them with interviewees prior to the conversation if requested. Professionals generally participate in 1-2 career or Capstone interviews during the school year.

Career Speaker - Visit the high school for 2-3 hours to speak with students and give them a preliminary understanding of a job or career

The goal of a career speaker is for students to develop a preliminary understanding of a job or career through a short presentation and conversation with a professional in that field. Giving a career talk requires the professional to prepare a presentation that offers students insight into a particular job or career. School personnel can provide a series of questions that career speakers can use to structure their presentations. Time is generally left at the end of a career talk for students to ask the presenter questions. Career speakers generally visit the school 1-2 times during the school year for 2-3 hours to speak with groups of students that have expressed interest in a particular career field. Dates and times for career talks are flexible to accommodate professionals' schedules.

Curriculum Consultation - Meet with educators to offer guidance, advice, and feedback on their curriculum, including opportunities to share projects and problems of practice

The goal of curriculum consultation is for businesses and other community organizations to use their knowledge and expertise to offer educators guidance, advice, and feedback on their curriculum. Curriculum consultations can happen in a single meeting or over the course of multiple meetings. In some cases, this consultation might involve a business sharing a situation or problem of practice that could become the basis of student work in the class. Curriculum consultations can happen with a single teacher or multiple teachers.

Internship - Host individual students over an extended period of time (generally 60-75 hours minimum) and develop projects or work that help students develop essential knowledge and skills for college and career

The goal of an internship for students to develop meaningful knowledge and skills while gaining hands-on experience in a career field of interest. Internships require the employer to develop a project and training process that helps students learn new knowledge and skills in a field of interest and also benefits their organization. Internships can happen during the school year or over the summer. Generally, students must intern for 60-75 hours to earn 0.5 credits. With sufficient planning and coordination with the school counseling department, students can engage in internships during the school year. Generally, students would be available for internships starting around 1:30 p.m. a few days a week during the school year. Internships can be paid or unpaid. State law mandates, however, that students earn school credit for internships that are unpaid. For-profit companies that intend to take on an unpaid intern must complete state-required paperwork for approval. The ideal internship arrangement is one in which a student makes a meaningful contribution to a project or problem while learning about themselves and their careers of interest.

Job Shadow - Host students or teachers at your workplace for 3-15 hours to help them learn about a specific job or career through first-hand observation and conversation

The goal of a job shadow is to help students and teachers learn about a particular job or career through first-hand observation and conversation with a professional in their field of interest. Job shadows require professionals to structure how shadowers will spend their time during the day. Job shadows typically occur during business hours (e.g., 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.) and would require students to request an excused absence during the school day. Students can also schedule job shadows on days off from school and during school vacations to avoid missing class time. Opportunities for small group (e.g., 3-5 students or teachers) shadows are often encouraged for efficiency purposes. Students and teachers generally spend 1-2 days engaged with a business or organization for a job shadow.

Organizational Visit - Host a group of students and school personnel in your workplace for 2-3 hours and give them an introduction your organization and/or industry through first-hand observation and conversation

The goal of an organizational visit is to give a large group of students and school personnel an introduction to a particular organization and/or industry through first-hand observation of a workplace. Organizational visits require the host to structure what visitors will see, hear, and experience during their time with the organization. Organizational visits generally work well when the host has something valuable for students and school personnel observe (e.g., technologies, processes, innovative workspaces, etc.) that they would not be able to see otherwise. Organizational visits generally involve larger groups of teachers and students, occur during business hours (e.g., 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.), and last for a few hours 1-2 times per year.

Project Collaboration - Collaborate with educators to identify or develop a project for students that addresses an organizational or community need and helps students learn essential knowledge and skills for college and career

The goal of project collaboration is to give students an authentic learning experience that helps them develop essential knowledge and skills in a field of interest while working on a project that will benefit their community. Project collaborations generally begin with a need that an organization or business has or a problem that it faces. This need or problem is then shared with the school and becomes the basis of student work as a part of an existing class or an extended learning opportunity. An example of a project collaboration is the What’s So Cool About Manufacturing? Video Competition. Project collaborations require planning and coordination between educators and community partners. In some cases, a project collaboration could serve as the basis for an internship for one student or a small group of students if it is approved by school personnel. Project collaborations generally take place over an extended period of time (anywhere from a few weeks to a semester) and can either occur once or on a continuing basis.