STUDENT RESOURCE CENTER

REHEARSAL SCHEDULE SUMMARY:

Rehearsals Begin January 2nd: Mondays - Fridays 2:30pm - 4:45pm

Note: No rehearsals during February Vacation.


Mandatory/Late Days:: 

If you are part of this production, you must be in full attendance to the following days. If there is an issue with these dates, you must discuss that conflict with the Director, in person, in December, when joining the production.


February 19 - 21, 2:30pm - 6:30pm (Tech Rehearsals)

March 4 - 6, 2:30pm - 7:30pm (Dress Rehearsals)

March 7, 2:30pm - 7:30pm (Reserve Day)

March 8 & 9, 4:45pm - 8:00pm (Public Performances)

March 15,  during school day - Assembly Performance

March 16, All Day - NHETG Regional Festival 

March 28 - 31, All Day - NHETG State Festival (We are Hosting)


(Note: New England Drama Festival: April 18-20th) 

Remind Information.pdf

MUSIC FILES

CAST MUSIC TRACKS WITH VOCALS

NOTE: O Mistress Mine starts at Letter F on page 146 of the Sheet Music.

The Rose & Curtain Theaters
Shakes and the fellas
Queen Elizabeth I
1590's Fashion
Theatre in the 1590s

Wedding Song Parts

Delessups Hall Dance

DIALECT COACH NOTES


DIALECT: Standard British or Received Pronunciation (RP)

We normally associate RP sound with characters who are educated and/or come from upper and

middle class backgrounds. The placement of resonance (the feel of the vibration) is forward in

the mouth, the lips round strongly forward, and the jaw drops to create the open vowels. The

tongue and lips need to be agile in the creation of consonant sounds. Pitch tends to be more

varied and musical than a general American sound.

Vowel Substitutions:

1. a as in “ask” changes to the a as in “father” (but only if the word is on the Ask Word List)

We laughed at the dancer after she fell into the bathtub. (all Ask Word List a’s) Daniel

ordered a glass of Brandy. (only “glass” is a Ask Word List a) 2. o as in “hold” changes to

eu

Don’t rock the boat if you can’t swim at home.

3. The short ee sound at the end of the word “family” is clipped and made into an i sound

We were very angry when Henry asked for our pity.

4. aw as in “awful” and o as in “odd” are darker and have strong forward stretch


It was an odd sort of shock to see the body buried at dawn.


5. u as in “duty” adds a liquid yu

The Duke’s duty was to hum a stupid tune.

Consonant Changes:

1. Drop final and medial r sounds

Father told Martha that the servant would put the bird in the garden.

2. Tap the r like a d when it comes between two vowels

The carriage was very bumpy, said Mary.

Special Words:

Necessary, Schedule, Again or Against, Been, Issue / Tissue, Privacy, Process

DIALECT: Cockney


We normally associate cockney with characters who are uneducated and/or poor or lower-class.

The tone is focused on the soft palate, which produces a nasal tone quality. The sound is guttural

and has a quality of almost “swallowing your words” while you speak.

Vowel Substitutions:

1. a as in “ask” changes to the a as in “father” (but only if the word is on the Ask Word List)

We laughed at the dancer after she fell into the bathtub. (all Ask Word List a’s) Daniel

ordered a glass of Brandy. (only “glass” is a Ask Word List a) 2. aw as in “awful” becomes

sustained and stretched forward sort of like o as in “home” The lawyer’s awfully awkward

daughter ought to be taught how to draw. 3. ee as in “me” changes to the uee

Pete will see that tea is served at a quarter past three.

4. ay as in “may” changes to the aee

Kate was late for her first date.

5. i as in “right” changes to awee

We’ll fight for the right to strike.

6. ou as in “doubt” changes to eou

He was about to toss the mouse out now.

Consonant Changes:

1. Drop final and medial r sounds

Father told Martha that the servant would put the bird in the garden.

2. Drop initial h

In Hartford, Hereford, and Hampshire, hurricanes hardly ever happen.

3. Drop the g from –ing endings

His drawing was making the others hurt from laughing.

4. Selective medial and final l’s change to oo

Bill filled his glass to feel good.

5. t between a vowel and consonant or at the end is dropped and replaces with a glottal stop

The little bottle was a pretty good price for the gentleman.