Classes

Students in grade six expand their understanding of history by studying the people and events that ushered in the dawn of the major Western and non-Western ancient civilizations. Geography is of special significance in the development of the human story. Continued emphasis is placed on the everyday lives, problems, and accomplishments of people, their role in developing social, economic, and political structures, as well as in establishing and spreading ideas that helped transform the world forever. Students develop higher levels of critical thinking by considering why civilizations developed where and when they did, why they became dominant, and why they declined. Students analyze the interactions among the various cultures, emphasizing their enduring contributions and the link, despite time, between the contemporary and ancient worlds.


  • Developing reading comprehension

  • Formal reasoning

  • Analysis of primary and secondary sources

  • Note-taking, highlighting, outlining, concept mapping (graphic organizers)

  • Executive functioning

  • Research and MLA citation

  • Oral presentations and technology-based projects

  • Simulations

Course Goals

We will focus on building a strong foundation of research and writing skills, while expanding our scope and focus to include more complex, high order thinking skills.

Students will develop an understanding of conceptual and factual historical knowledge. In addition, we will focus on developing reading comprehension, formal reasoning, note-taking, research, working in groups, oral presentations, technology-based projects, highlighting, outlining, concept mapping, current events, debates, and simulations.

Students focus on the social, cultural, and technological changes that occurred in Europe, Africa, Asia, Central America, and South America in the years A.D. 500-1789. Students study the history and geography of great civilizations that were developing concurrently throughout the world during medieval and modern times. They examine the growing economic interaction among civilizations as well as the exchange of ideas, beliefs, technologies, and commodities. They learn about the resulting growth of Enlightenment philosophy and the new examination of the concepts of reason and authority, the natural rights of human beings, the divine right of kings, experimentalism in science, and the dogma of belief.


  • Developing reading comprehension

  • Formal reasoning

  • Analysis of primary and secondary sources

  • Note-taking, highlighting, outlining, concept mapping (graphic organizers)

  • Research and MLA citation

  • Oral presentations and technology-based projects

  • Simulations

Course Goals

This class is designed to captivate, entertain, and stimulate, while developing an understanding of conceptual and factual historical knowledge. In addition, we will focus on developing reading comprehension skills with expository text, formal reasoning skills, research skills, working in groups, oral presentations, technology-based projects, current events, and simulations. We will also practice different forms of note-taking such as concept mapping (graphic organizers), highlighting, Cornell notes, and outlining.

To prepare for eighth-grade social studies, we will build a strong foundation in research and writing and will work to include more complex, high order thinking skills.

Students study the ideas, issues, and events from the framing of the Constitution up to World War I. After reviewing the development of America's democratic institutions founded on the Judeo-Christian heritage and English parliamentary traditions, particularly the shaping of the Constitution, students trace the development of American politics, society, culture, and economy. They learn about the challenges facing the new nation, with an emphasis on causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War. They make connections between the rise of industrialization and contemporary social and economic conditions.


  • Developing reading comprehension

  • Formal reasoning

  • Analysis of primary and secondary sources

  • Note-taking, highlighting, outlining, concept mapping (graphic organizers)

  • Executive functioning

  • Research and MLA citation

  • Oral presentations and technology-based projects

  • Current events, debates, and simulations

  • Socratic Seminar

Course Goals

The eighth-grade social studies program is designed to prepare students for high school. More specifically, this course will prepare those who wish to pursue AP History in high school. We will focus on building a strong foundation of research and writing skills, while expanding our scope and focus to include more complex, high order thinking skills.

Students will develop an understanding of conceptual and factual historical knowledge. In addition, we will focus on developing reading comprehension, formal reasoning, note-taking, research, working in groups, oral presentations, technology-based projects, highlighting, outlining, concept mapping, current events, debates, and simulations.