Programs

Supported General Education

A special education student in the general education setting is provided instruction in the same manner as a general education student. The general education teacher is responsible for providing the appropriate accommodations and modifications that are identified in the student's IEP.

Resource Center Replacement (RCR)

In Resource Center Replacement, general education curriculum is modified and adapted to meet the students' individual needs and supplemented with special education materials. The groups range in size from two to nine students. Any group exceeding nine students is provided with an aide. The New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards are implemented through this program. Each student’s IEP goals and objectives are given focus within the realm of the curriculum.

In-Class Resource (ICR)

An In-Class Resource program is co-taught by one general education teacher and one special education teacher. Up to ten special education students are present in a classroom with general education students. In-class resource involves adapting and modifying the general education curriculum within the child’s general education classroom. General education and special education teachers are responsible for providing the appropriate accommodations and modifications that are listed in each individual student's IEP. In-class support is provided on an individual basis based on the student’s IEP. The in-class support teacher collaborates with the regular education teacher so that students may participate successfully in the mainstream curriculum.

Multiply Disabled (MD)

The MD Classroom contains students who learn their schoolwork in different ways. One special education teacher and up to twelve special education students are present in the classroom. A class exceeding nine students is provided with an aide. Learning occurs in a multi-sensory room and is provided both at the group and individual levels. Social growth and development is also emphasized and infused into the academic instruction.

Learning Language Disabilities (LLD)

The Learning and/or Language Disabilities (LLD) Classes are self-contained, small-group classes for students with mild to moderate disabilities. One special education teacher and up to sixteen special education students are present in the classroom. A class exceeding ten students is provided with an aide. The students in the LLD class receive instruction in all major academic areas. Students are able to receive the required elements of their academic instruction in an individualized or small group setting, while participating with their peers in general education to the maximum extent possible. The LLD teachers make modifications and accommodations to the general education curriculum to provide a successful education experience for each student. Additional support is provided by classroom paraprofessionals.

Behavioral Disabilities (BD)

The Behavioral Disabilities (BD) Program provides a behaviorally structured setting for high school students whose behaviors substantially impede their learning. One special education teacher and up to twelve special education students are present in the classroom. A class exceeding nine students is provided with an aide. Students earn incentives through a class-wide token economy system, and are provided with direct instruction on how to effectively regulate their behavior. Every student in the program has an individualized Behavior Intervention Plan, and receives individual counseling and Social Skills Training. Students who have demonstrated social and emotional growth are integrated back into general education classes.

Cognitive Severe (CS)

The Cognitive Severe (CS) program is designed to prepare high school students with severe cognitive disabilities for a successful transition from school to adult community life. The curriculum follows each student’s IEP and parallels the NJCCCS. The focus of the curriculum is on life skills and communication. All students receive Occupational, Physical, and Speech/Language Therapy, and adaptive physical education based on needs identified in their IEP. The areas of focus in this classroom are: Self Care Skills, Social Skills, Cognitive Skills, Sensory Need, Mobility, Communication Skills and Functional Academic Skills. One special education teacher and up to nine special education students are present in the classroom. A class size of three to six students requires one paraprofessional, and a class size of seven to nine students requires two paraprofessionals in the classroom.

Vocational and Life Skills Classes

The Vocational and Life Skills classes help students develop functional daily living skills that will prepare them for the application of academic and social skills in life, as well as beginning preparation for the workplace.

There are three levels of vocational and life skills classes that are each taught by one special education teacher:

  1. Life skills
  2. Prevocational skills
  3. Job Sampling (as appropriate)

Students are taught numerous skills, through small group and individualized instruction, that can translate into job skills. Such skills include, but are not limited to, interviewing skills, handling money, grocery shopping, banking, using the library, and navigating Blairstown and the surrounding area. As appropriate, older students in the class may be connected with local businesses that provide opportunities for them to sample various job positions. In addition, all levels of the vocational and life skills classes join together once a week to prepare and cook a dish.