Copyright Tips

tips from the pro's... to protect your book's earning power!

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What is a copyright?

A copyright is a form of legal protection granted to the creators of original works, such as printed book, e-book, audio-book, video, photos, illustrations, pictures, songs, software and website.

It gives the copyright holder the exclusive right to reproduce, sell, distribute, and display the work, as well as to create derivative works based on it.

Copyrights enable authors to make money by selling their work and preventing others from copying or selling their work without their permission or a license.

This means that others cannot use, share or distribute the work without the copyright owner’s permission.

In the U. S., your copyright protection lasts for your lifetime, plus 70 years**.

While you are automatically granted a copyright when you create an original work, the U. S. Supreme Court requires that you register your copyrights before filing a lawsuit to protect and enforce your rights. You can register both unpublished and published works.

To start your protection, click to learn more about registration NOW!

Is a copyright needed for each ISBN?

ISBN vs. Copyrights?

An ISBN (International Standard Book Number) is a unique numerical identifier assigned to each specific edition and format of a book, such as hardcover, paperback, e-book, audio-book, etc. It is used to identify and track books in the book industry.

Copyright, on the other hand, is a form of legal protection granted to the creators of original works, such as printed book, e-book, audio-book, video, photos, illustrations, pictures, songs, software and website.

Do you need a separate copyright for each ISBN?

No… you do not need a separate copyright for each ISBN. Copyright applies to the work as a whole, not to specific editions or formats of the work.

For example:

You need a separate ISBN for each format of the same work – such as: hardcover, paperback, e-book, audio-book, etc. But as long as each format has the identical content (i.e., same title and manuscript version, same photos, illustrations, cover art, etc.) and the same author(s) and claimant(s) then one copyright can cover all formats.

However, if an ISBN refers to different works or different owners (i.e., with different titles or manuscript, etc.) then you would need a separate copyright for each work. If a new edition of the book is created with a revised cover or revised text, it may be considered a new work and should be registered with a new copyright application to cover the changes from the previous work.

It's worth noting that ISBN is an optional field on your copyright application – and only one ISBN can be listed; it’s best to list the primary ISBN that may have the most sales.

To start your protection, click to learn more about registration NOW!

The information contained in this post and software application are believed to be accurate at the time of publication; however, copyright regulations change and subject to various interpretations… so always consult with a personal attorney for legal advice.

DISCLAIMERS: Digi-Rights® and CopyrightsNow® are registered trademarks of Digi-Rights Direct LLC. CopyrightsNow is not affiliated with the U. S. Copyright Office. Neither Digi-Rights Direct LLC nor its Affiliate Partners or Service Providers are attorneys and we do not provide legal advice regarding copyrights and licensing, and we are not liable for any damages resulting from reliance upon statements and tutorial material.