Speakers

Nicole Palanuk is the Manager of Library Instruction and Services at Yellowhead Tribal College. She has an Honours BA in History from the University of Ottawa and an MLIS from the University of Western Ontario.

Danielle Powder is an urban Métis woman, living and working in the Treaty Six Territory. She currently serves as the Indigenous Relations Advisor for the Edmonton Public Library, supporting Indigenous community through partnerships, events, programs and services.

Mary Weasel Fat, BA/BED University of Lethbridge, University of Calgary, MEd Interdisciplinary Program Poo’miikapi: Niitsitapii Approaches to Wellness (Aug. 2017 to present).

Mary is Blackfoot from Kainai First Nation/Blood Tribe in Southern Alberta. She is the Library Coordinator, Elder Coordinator and part-time instructor at Mikaisto (Red Crow) Community College, Standoff, Alberta. Most recently Mary wrote a chapter in a book - Aboriginal and Visible Minority Librarians: Oral Histories from Canada. She was instrumental in establishing the Kainai Public Library in Standoff, the first public library on an Indian Reserve in Alberta, and received the Library Association of Alberta President’s Award.

Christine Bone is a Cataloguing Librarian at the University of Manitoba Libraries, specializing in subject analysis/classification, authority control, and rare book cataloguing. Her current research focuses on subject headings related to Indigenous peoples.

Alissa Cherry is the Research Manager at the UBC Museum of Anthropology (MOA). She is a member of the Academy of Certified Archivists and holds an MLIS from UBC. Prior to joining MOA in 2014, Alissa managed the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs Resource Centre, worked for both the BC Aboriginal Child Care Society and Xwi7xwa Library, and was librarian in Yellowstone National Park.

Sharon Farnel is Metadata Coordinator at the University of Alberta Libraries, and a part-time Interdisciplinary PhD student researching the development of a framework for designing and applying culturally aware and appropriate metadata in digital libraries.

Kim Lawson is a member of the Heiltsuk Nation, (Bella Bella, BC) and a librarian at Xwi7xwa Library. When she was Archivist/ Librarian at the Resource Centre for the Union of BC Indian Chiefs (UBCIC), she worked on the online digital collection Our Homes Are Bleeding to provide access to primary materials and digitally preserve at risk audio and video materials in-house. Her MLIS studies at the UBC School of Library, Archival and Information Studies included her thesis, “Precious Fragments: First Nations Perspectives on Archives, Libraries and Museums.” Kim is learning to hear, speak and write her Heiltsuk language.

Megan Arcand is a Métis student who grew up in Treaty 6 territory, in the steadily growing town of Whitecourt. She is currently completing a Bachelors of Arts in Native Studies, as well as a Certificate in Aboriginal Governance and Partnership. Megan sits on the Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation Committee with the Students Union. She is frequently spotted at Remedy on 109, drinking chai with good company.

Tânsi', Nipahkwesimowin-Pahpimoteht (ᓂᐸᐦᑫᐧᓯᒧᐃᐧᐣ ᐸᐦᐱᒧᑌᐦᐟ) nitisiyihkâson. Ambrose Cardinal wears many hats, anywhere from advocating for the rights of Indigenous peoples,jigging to "zine" making. He is currently in his third year of Kinesiology, where he looks to further his study in Physiotherapy and perhaps medicine where he hopes to de-institutionalize the entire healthcare system. Ambrose is currently an executive member of the Aboriginal Student Council that is meant to act as the student governing body for all Indigenous students on campus. Recently, Ambrose has been working in partnership with Coutts library to create Nantâwihiwêwin, a resource for Indigenous youth that focuses on traditional health, resiliency and reclamation.

Molly Swain is an otipêmsiw-iskwêw from otôskwanihk in Treaty 7 territory. She's currently completing a Masters of Arts in Native Studies, researching Jim Brady, a 20th century Métis communist political organizer. Molly is also the co-host of Métis in Space, an Indigenous feminist science fiction podcast. She is notoriously bad at paying her overdue fines.

Jessie Loyer is Cree-Métis and a member of Michel First Nation. She is a librarian at Mount Royal University, a guest on Blackfoot and Treaty 7 territory. Her research looks at Indigenous perspectives on information literacy, supporting language revitalization, and creating ongoing research relationships using a nêhiyaw minâ otipêmisiw concept of kinship.

Camille Callison (B.A. Anthropology, M.L.I.S. First Nations Concentration) is from the Tsesk iye (Crow) Clan of the Tahltan Nation, the Indigenous Services Librarian/Liaison Librarian for Anthropology, Native Studies & Social Work and a Member of the Indigenous Advisory Circle at the University of Manitoba. Camille is the Canadian Federation of Library Associations/Fédération canadienne des associations de bibliothèques (CFLA-FCAB) Indigenous Representative; a member, Copyright Committee and Chair of the Indigenous Matters Committee. She is a member of IFLA Indigenous Matters Standing Committee and the Canadian Commission for UNESCO Memory of the World Committee and Sector Commission on Culture, Communications & Information.