Course Descriptions

2018-19

THE SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

The science department at South Kingstown High School recognizes the common core of learning - communication, problem solving, body of knowledge, and responsibility. We agree that all students graduating from South Kingstown High School will address the unifying concepts of: systems, cycles, models, habits of mind, and the nature of science. Students will understand the use and application of technology and its significance in the scientific world.

Core course selections are aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). All students must complete the following core science courses in order to demonstrate proficiency with the NGSS Performance Expectations: Earth and Space Science (Grade 9), Biology (Grade 10), and Chemistry (Grade 10 or 11). Course descriptions including the Pathway designation are part of an approved career and technical education pathway.

Freshmen will automatically be enrolled in Earth and Space Science unless they meet the criteria for placement in the accelerated course sequence or have opted to enter the biomedical pathway. The criteria includes Grade 8 testing results, course grades in English language arts, mathematics, and science, and Grade 8 science teacher recommendation. Incoming freshmen meeting the selection criteria may enter an accelerated sequence of science courses including Honors Biology (Grade 9), Honors Chemistry (Grade 10), and Honors Physics (Grade 10 or 11).

Students may elect to enter pathways in the science department. Current offerings include Certified Nursing Assistant, Emergency Medical Technician, or Biomedical Science (Project Lead The Way). Pathways in science have specific course sequences as shown on the Pathways page.

Earth and Space Science 11401 (1 credit) Grade 9

This course uses a contemporary approach to the study of Earth and space. Content includes exposure to geology, solar system astronomy, and extra-solar astronomy. Physical science principles are applied throughout the course. Students are responsible for the timely completion of laboratory reports and projects. Tools and technology are used to develop laboratory skills. A basic theme is the relevance of earth and space in everyday life. Understanding of basic mathematical concepts is recommended in order to apply higher order mathematical and problem solving techniques to scientific data. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course.

  • This course is considered a laboratory science. (SLE: A1, A2)

Honors Biology 11420 (1 credit) Grades 9-12

This course emphasizes the basic principles common to all living things, including how life is similar and related, as well as diverse, through the study of life at a molecular, cellular and organism levels. Topics include ecology, biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and evolution. Information on careers in biology and health sciences is presented. There is a considerable focus on laboratory investigation, scientific writing and problem solving. The course involves using lab data, mathematical computation and analysis. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to practice greater in-depth analysis of Biology concepts. Extensive writing and reading, advanced mathematical calculations and additional inquiry opportunities will provide added rigor. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course. This course is recommended for those taking the SAT Subject Test in Biology.

  • This course is considered a laboratory science. (SLE: A1, A2)
  • Pathway Course P

Principles of Biomedical Science 11475 (1 credit) Grade 9

In the introductory course of the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Biomedical Science program, students explore concepts of biology and medicine to determine factors that led to the death of a fictional person. While investigating the case, students examine autopsy reports, investigate medical history, and explore medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes while allowing them to design their own experiments to solve problems.

  • This course is considered a laboratory science.
  • Pathway course P

Biology 11421 (1 credit) Grades 10-12

This course emphasizes the basic principles common to all living things, including how life is similar and related, as well as diverse, through the study of life at a molecular, cellular and organism levels. Topics include ecology, biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and evolution. Information on careers in biology and health sciences is presented. There is a focus on laboratory investigation, scientific writing and problem solving. The course involves using lab data, mathematical computation and analysis. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course.

  • This course is considered a laboratory science. (SLE: A1, A2)
  • Pathway Course P

Project-Based Biology 11421PB Grade 10 (1 credit)

course emphasizes the basic principles common to all living things, including how life is similar and related, as well as diverse, through the study of life at a molecular, cellular and organism levels. Information on careers in biology and health sciences is presented. There is a focus on laboratory investigation, scientific writing and problem solving. The course involves using lab data, mathematical computation and analysis. The instruction model in this class empowers students to become self-directed learners—they set goals for their learning, reflect on their progress and build habits and mindsets to help them succeed in college, career and life with mentorship from their teachers. Students engage with projects that connect the classroom to the real world. When students work in teams to apply what they're learning to projects that mimic and solve real-world problems, they develop strong collaboration, communication and critical thinking skills. This model set-up of this class will also allow students opportunities to earn honors credit if they complete additional focus areas assigned by the teacher.

Chemistry 11431 (1 credit) Grades 10-12

This is a laboratory course that meets the standards in preparation for further post-secondary science programs. Problems solving, concept building and reasoning skills are integral to this course. This involves interpretation of word problems; application of acceptable methods for solving problems along with hands-on lab experience. Emphasis will also be placed on critical thinking, use of tools and technologies, scientific communication, and scientific inquiry and investigation, and alternate methods of assessment. Focus is placed on the quantitative as well as the qualitative analysis of problems and experimental evidence. Topics include Relationships between Matter and Energy, Properties and Classification of Matter, Atomic Structure, Electron Arrangement, Periodicity and the Periodic Table, Chemical Bonding, Reactions and Reaction types, Chemical Shorthand and Equations, Stoichiometry, and Gas Laws. The course employs physical science concepts, technology and applied standards from the New Standards. A strong mathematical foundation is recommended to ensure success in this course. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course.

  • This course (or Honors Chemistry 11432) is required to participate in the Rhode Island College Early Enrollment Credit Program when followed by enrollment in AP Chemistry 11433.
  • This course meets the Mathematics Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to be considered a fourth year of mathematics.
  • This course is considered a laboratory science. (SLE: A1, A2, A3)

Honors Chemistry 11432 (1 credit) Grades 10-12

This is a laboratory course that meets the standards in preparation for further post-secondary science programs. The program focuses on greater depth and breadth of the concepts covered in Chemistry 431. Emphasis is placed on problem solving, concept building, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and reasoning skills. These skills are accomplished by means of word problems, application of acceptable methods for solving problems, alternate assessment, and hands-on lab experience. The curriculum employs a strong commitment to an accurate, authoritative and comprehensive view of chemical principles. Topics include properties of matter, atomic theory, chemical reactions, periodicity and the periodic table, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, quantum theory, electron configuration, and chemical bonding. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course. A deep understanding of mathematical concepts and skills to apply mathematics in scientific context is strongly recommended for this course.

  • This course (or Chemistry 11431) is required to participate in the Rhode Island College Early Enrollment Credit Program when followed by enrollment in AP Chemistry 11433.
  • his course meets the Mathematics Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to be considered a fourth year of mathematics. This course is considered a laboratory science. (SLE: A1, A2, A3)
  • Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Biology 11420 with an A or B (or Biology 11421 with an A).

Honors Physics 11446 (1 credit) Grades 11-12

The fundamental goal of the course is to provide a mathematical and conceptual understanding of physics concepts. The program emphasizes the development of mathematical problem solving skills, along with laboratory techniques and computer skills. A strong background in algebra, geometry and introductory trigonometry is required. The course covers structure and function of matter, motion, forces, energy conservation and transfer, momentum, torque and power. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course. A final culmination of this course requires that students identify, manage, and carry out a curriculum-encompassing engineering project.

  • This course is considered a laboratory science.
  • This course meets the Mathematics Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to be considered a fourth year of mathematics.
  • Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 11332 or Honors Algebra 2 11333

AP Biology 11424 (1 credit) Grades 11-12

The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course. The course is designed to be taken by students after the successful completion of Honors Biology (with an A or B)/Biology (with an A) and Honors Chemistry (with an A or B)/Chemistry (with an A). Topics to be discussed include: energy transfer, evolution, relationship of structure to function, continuity and change, and regulation. All of these topics fall under the three general areas for the course: Molecules and Cells, Heredity and Evolution, and Organisms and Populations. AP Biology aims to provide a laboratory experience equivalent to that of a typical college course. This course is intended for students who have a strong interest in biology or who are considering a career in Biology. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course.

  • Students who enroll in this AP course are required to complete the appropriate AP exam in May. Payment for the exam will be required during the first weeks of school in September. (SLE: A1, A2)
  • Prerequisite: Students should have successfully completed Biology 11421 or Honors Biology 11420 and concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 11431 or Honors Chemistry 11432.

AP Chemistry 11433 (1 credit) Grades 11-12

NOTE: This course will be offered in academic years alternately with AP Environmental Science 11458 with sufficient enrollment.

The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. Students in this course will attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course will contribute to the development of the students’ abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic. Topics to be discussed are: the kinetic-molecular theory, liquids, solids and solutions, acid-base reactions and buffer systems, oxidation-reduction reactions, equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics, and organic chemistry. AP Chemistry aims to provide a laboratory experience equivalent to that of a typical college course. This class is intended for students who have a strong interest in chemistry or are considering a career in the medical field, biology or engineering. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course. A college text is used in this course and this course is considered a laboratory science, as well. Students taking this course are eligible for college credit in conjunction with the Rhode Island College Early Enrollment Program.

  • This course meets the Mathematics Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to be considered a fourth year of mathematics.
  • Students who enroll in this AP course are required to complete the appropriate AP exam in May. Payment for the exam will be required during the first weeks of school in September. (SLE: A1, A2, A3)
  • Prerequisite: Students should have successfully completed Chemistry 11431 or Honors Chemistry 11432 and Algebra 2 11332 or Honors Algebra 2 11333.

AP Environmental Science 11458 (1 credit) Grades 11-12

NOTE: This course will be offered in academic years alternately with AP Chemistry 11433 with sufficient enrollment.

The AP Environmental Science course is equivalent to a one-semester introductory college environmental science course. The course is designed to be taken by students after successful completion of Biology and Chemistry. The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study such as Earth Systems and Resources, The Living World, Population, Land and Water Use, Energy Resources and Consumption, Pollution and Global Change. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course.

  • Students who enroll in this AP course are required to complete the appropriate AP exam in May. Payment for the exam will be required during the first weeks of school in September. (SLE A1, A2)
  • Prerequisite: Students should have successfully completed Biology 11421 or Honors Biology 11420. Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 11431 or Honors Chemistry 11432. Due to the quantitative analysis required in the course, students should have successfully completed at least one year of algebra. Proficiency in earth science is also recommended

AP Physics I 11445 (1 credit) Grades 11-12

This introductory course is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. It is the appropriate course selection for those students anticipating a university curriculum where science or technology might be considered. The fundamental goal of this course is to provide a conceptualization of the physical environment and utilizes a university text. Students will develop concepts in basic physics, but there is emphasis on mathematical problem solving skills and laboratory techniques. An integrated knowledge of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry is required. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course. A final culmination of this course requires that students identify, manage, and carry out a curriculum – encompassing engineering project.

  • Successful completion of the course is required for future enrollment in AP Physics 2.
  • This course is considered a laboratory science.
  • This course is required to participate in the Rhode Island College Early Enrollment Credit Program when followed by enrollment in AP Physics 2 11444.
  • This course meets the Mathematics Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to be considered a fourth year of mathematics.
  • Students who enroll in this AP course are required to complete the appropriate AP exam in May. Payment for the exam will be required during the first weeks of school in September.
  • Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry 11322 or Honors Geometry 11323 and concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2 11332 or Honors Algebra 2 11333. It is strongly recommended that student have completed or are concurrently enrolled in Pre-Calculus 11342 or Honors Pre-Calculus 11343. Due to the sequential nature of the AP Physics courses, preference will be given to juniors who require this course as a prerequisite to taking AP Physics 2 11444.

AP Physics 2 11444 (1 credit) Grade 12

This advanced course considers traditional topics in physics beyond those in AP Physics 1 (11445) and represents a preparation targeted for further study in the physical sciences or in engineering at the university level. The fundamental goal of the course is to provide a further conceptualization of the physical environment. While still algebra-based, this course is the equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; and atomic and nuclear physics. Mathematical analysis of situations and problem solving are heavily stressed, and laboratory design techniques supplement this goal. A working knowledge of introductory calculus is important for success in this program. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course. This is a college program course, and students are expected to manage their own portfolios, final course projects, and their year-long performance.

  • This course is considered a laboratory science.
  • This course meets the Mathematics Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to be considered a fourth year of mathematics.
  • Students taking this course are eligible for college credit in conjunction with the Rhode Island College Early Enrollment Program.
  • Students who enroll in this AP course are required to complete the appropriate AP exam in May. Payment for the exam will be required during the first weeks of school in September.
  • Prerequisite: Completion of AP Physics 1 11445 and concurrent enrollment in Pre-Calculus 11342 or Honors Pre-Calculus 11343 or a higher level math course.

AP Physics C 11443 (1 credit) Grade 12

This course is a calculus-based course, which follows the AP Physics 1 course (11445). This course represents preparation targeted for further study in the physical sciences or in engineering at the university level. The fundamental goal of the course is to provide a further conceptualization of the physical environment. Each semester is equivalent to a one-semester, calculus-based, college-level physics course. The first semester of the course covers mechanics; the second semester of the course covers electricity and magnetism. Mathematical analysis of situations and problem solving are heavily stressed, and laboratory design techniques supplement this goal. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout this program. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course. This is a college program course, and students are expected to manage their own portfolios, final course projects, and their year-long performance.

  • This course is considered a laboratory science.
  • This course meets the Mathematics Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to be considered a fourth year of mathematics.
  • Students who enroll in this AP course are required to complete the appropriate AP exam in May. Payment for the exam will be required during the first weeks of school in September.
  • Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Physics 1 11445 and concurrent enrollment in Calculus 11352, AP Calculus AB 11354, or AP Calculus BC 11353.

Environmental Biology 11461 (1 credit) Grades 11-12

This course is designed for students interested in a broad picture of the inner workings of nature and sustainability practices. Students will explore the environmental, social, and economic issues that affect the present and future health of our world. Experiential learning will include agriculture and a small mammal field study. Students will have the hands on opportunity to grow food. This will include gourmet mushrooms in winter and utilization of the SKHS greenhouse and garden beds in fall and spring to grow vegetables and ornamental plants. Course topics include: Earth’s climate, major biomes of the world, ecosystem structure, environmental problems, food webs, population control, predator/prey relationships, biodiversity, and botany. The program is highly recommended for students interested in pursuing environmental studies in college.

  • This course is considered a laboratory science. (SLE: A1, A2, A3)

Honors Anatomy & Physiology 11451 (1 credit) Grades 11-12

The relationships between structure and function in the human body are studied in this course. This is accomplished through experimentation, examination of organs, comparison of systems Sand discussion and study of cellular and histological functions. Topics of study may include biological chemistry, the nervous, skeletal, digestive, cardiovascular, endocrine, vascular, respiratory and excretory systems, as well as the senses. Students’ personal experiences related to disease and body malfunctions, careers in the science field and current events are incorporated into the study. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course. This course is useful to students intending to pursue a career in the healthcare field or planning on completing the SAT Subject Test in Biology.

  • This course is considered to be a laboratory science. (SLE: A1, A2, A3)
  • Prerequisite: Biology 11421. Successful completion of Chemistry 11431 is strongly recommended.
  • Pathway Course P

Honors Biotechnology: Laboratory Methods in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology 11428 (1 credit) Grades 11-12

This course provides students interested in pursuing a career in the medical and biological sciences with the basic knowledge and practical laboratory skills needed to construct a solid foundation for smooth transitioning to a university life science curriculum. The rapidly evolving science in the fields of cell and molecular biology is the result of our increasingly detailed understanding of how life works at the level of the molecule and gene. The focus of this course will be laboratory-based instruction in the basic tools and techniques of molecular biology. Students will learn sterile technique, how to make different media and solutions, tissue culture and plant propagation, applied staining protocols, correct use of the laminar flow hood, and statistical analysis of data. In addition, students will participate in laboratory experiences using essential laboratory technologies such as gel electrophoresis, spectrophotometer assays to quantify protein concentration, restriction enzyme analysis, western blot analysis of proteins, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to detect antigen and antibody levels, protein purification, transformation of E. coli with the green fluorescent protein gene, and PCR (polymerase chain reaction) to locate specific nucleotide sequences within the human genome. Students will have the opportunity to implement the technical skills and knowledge they have acquired by designing, implementing, and evaluating an original research project on a relevant topic.

  • Successful completion of this course meets the graduation requirement for a .5 credit in technology. (SLE: A1, A2, A3)
  • Prerequisite: Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 11431 or Honors Chemistry 11432

Human Anatomy & Diseases 11452 (1 credit) Grades 11-12

The relationships between structure and function in the human body are studied in this course. This is accomplished through experimentation, examination of organs and comparison of systems. A survey of common diseases of the human body are addressed in this course. Topics of study include medical terminology, the nervous, skeletal, integumentary, digestive, cardiovascular, endocrine, vascular, respiratory and excretory systems, as well as the senses. This course is useful to students intending to pursue a career in the healthcare field.

  • This course is required for those students enrolled in the CNA pathway.
  • This course is considered to be a laboratory science. (SLE: A1, A2, A3)
  • Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology 11421 or Honors Biology 11420.
  • Pathway Course P

Certified Nurse Assistant (2 credits) (1 year, 2 periods) Grade 11, 12 Science 11470 1.5 Credit CNA Health/Physical Education 11472 ½ Credit

The CNA course will prepare students to learn about the patient care in nursing facilities, patient homes and hospitals. Upon successful completion of this high school Nursing Assistant training program, the candidate will know and be able to:

  1. Assist patients/residents with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) including personal hygiene, dressing and grooming, nutrition and hydrations, elimination, rest/sleep/comfort;
  2. Perform basic nursing skills including, following infection control and safety/emergency procedures/practices, therapeutic/technical procedures, data collection and reporting;
  3. Assist patients/residents with restorative care skills;
  4. Assist patients/residents with emotional and Mental Health needs;
  5. Communicate with medical personnel and patients;
  6. Abide by client’s rights, legal and ethical behaviors;
  7. Be an active member of the healthcare team;
  8. Provide care that meets spiritual and cultural needs.

Students may be expected to complete the required fieldwork experience outside of their school day

Credentials: The CNA program at SKHS comprises of a total of 233 hours between classroom and clinical internship before the student is allowed to take the state certification exam. Successful completion of coursework and field work offered through this course will prepare students to take the Rhode Island Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) license secured by successfully passing a written exam/skills evaluation with an associated cost of $99.00. *A student is allowed one (1) year from the date you began your nursing assistant training program to pass the nursing assistant examination. If you do not pass the NNAAP Examination within the 1-year training period or have failed the examinations three (3) times, candidate is required to re-train in program. Other credentials included within the training course: BLS for the healthcare provider CPR Credits Successful completion of this course will allow students to gain 0.25 credits in health, 0.25 credits in PE and 1.5 credit in Science

Emergency Medical Technician (2 credits) (1 year, 2 periods) Grade 12 Science 11480 1.5 Credit EMT Health/Physical Education 11482 ½ Credit

In this course students will complete 233 hours of EMT training which comprises of all related coursework and fieldwork experience. This training prepares students to take the NREMT computer based certification exam along with a NREMT Based practical skills exam required in order to become a licensed EMT in Rhode Island. The exam has an associated cost of approximately $80. Once licensed the individual may work in both the public and private EMS setting. The EMT is considered the entry level provider to work on an ambulance or rescue in RI. At SKHS the EMT candidate will receive training in the required curriculum for the course, but will also receive; certification in emergency vehicle operations for ambulances, Supra-glottic airway management, and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), advanced pharmacology and Rhode Island Pre-hospital Care Protocols. Students may be expected to complete the required fieldwork experience outside of their school day

Credentials: The students, who wish to become a skilled EMT in Rhode Island, have to go through an EMT training program and may have to provide a Bureau of Criminal Identification (BCI) report. Students must be 18 years old with a high school diploma. Other Credentials included within the training course: BLS for the Healthcare provider Incident Command System 100 Incident Command System 200 National Incident Management System 700 National Incident Management System 800 AWR-160 (terrorism awareness)

Credits: Successful completion of this course will allow students to gain 0.25 credits in health, 0.25 credits in PE and 1.5 credit in Science

Animal Behavior 11481 (½ credit) (1 semester) Grades 11-12

This course covers the behaviors employed by animals to facilitate their survival and improve their fitness. It designed to be taken by students after successful completion of Biology or Honors Biology. Topics to be covered are learning and instinct, animal migration, feeding behavior, reproduction and mating, parenting and social behavior. Concepts from genetics, natural selection and evolution will be applied to animal behavior. Current articles on animal behavior will be read and discussed, and laboratory activities will be conducted. A research project involving independent field work is required. Students will have the opportunity complete portfolio assignments in this course.

  • Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology 11421 or Honors Biology 11420.

Cybersecurity 11490 (½ credit) (1 semester) Grades 9-12

Overview of the technical background required to provide solutions to many cyber security problems. This background includes: binary/hex number systems, operating systems concepts, file systems, OSI model, network topologies and protocols. The material will be presented in the context of its necessity for providing cyber security solutions. Students may be eligible to earn 4 credits at the University of Rhode Island for successful completion of this course.

Course Goals:

  • To introduce students to basic cyber security concepts.
  • To provide students with hands-on practice with fundamental cybersecurity practices.
  • To prepare students to, with some further study, take the A+ Certification exam if they choose to.
  • To prepare students for more advanced cyber security and digital forensics courses.
  • Specific learning outcomes are listed in each lesson under the Curriculum.


  • Successful completion of this course meets the graduation requirement for .5 credit in Science or a ½ credit in Technology - not both.
  • Pathway Course P

Astronomy 11406 (½ credit) (1 semester) Grades 11-12

This course will provide students with an introduction to the concepts of modern astronomy, including the origin and history of the universe and solar system. Students will participate as citizen scientists and contribute to the field of astronomy by categorizing galaxies, searching for near-earth asteroids and locating new black holes. We will examine how the heavens have influenced human thought and action and look at how our understanding of Earth’s place in the universe has changed over time. The course will demonstrate how the laws of physics are used to reveal mysteries of the universe. Elementary physics and mathematics will be used to obtain both a qualitative and a quantitative understanding of astronomy. Spectroscopy, space technology, planetary motion, quasars, black holes, stellar evolution, measuring distances in space and the search for extraterrestrial life are among topics covered. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course.

  • The course is considered a laboratory science. (SLE: A1, A2)

Meteorology 11480 (½ credit) (1 semester) Grades 11–12

This course is a study of the Earth’s weather systems with an emphasis on atmosphere, global wind belts and pressure systems, and precipitation. The topics include: solar and terrestrial radiation; temperature; human comfort with regard to temperature; air pressure changes and humidity; storms; and the technology for monitoring weather. There will be a culminating project involving how weather affects humans in the economic, social, political, and environmental domains. Students will have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course.

  • This course is considered a laboratory science. (SLE: A1, A2, A3)

Oceanography 11463 (½ credit) (1 semester) Grades 11-12

Oceans are the largest unexplored area of earth. This course will provide an introduction to biological, geological, physical and chemical oceanography. It will include the exploration of the geological structure of the ocean floor and mineral resources; paleoceanography; the chemical composition and properties of seawater and pollutants; the physical study of waves, tsunamis, tides and currents and the innumerable forms of life within the oceans. A variety of ocean ecosystems and the key role that oceans play in climate change, both now and in the geologic past, will be explored. This course will enable students to achieve scientific literacy with respect to the oceans and will provide a basis for understanding marine environmental and resource issues that affect their lives. Ocean technology and engineering will also be explored. Students have the opportunity to complete portfolio assignments in this course.

  • The course is considered a laboratory science. (SLE: A1, A2)

Introduction to Computer Science 11465 (½ credit) (1 semester) Grades 9-12

This is a course for all students (not just those interested in computer science as a career) that introduces computer programming in a creative way and provides the computational thinking skills of programming, algorithm development, and data analysis that can be used in other classes, such as NGSS science classes. Students will produce evidence of meeting student expectations for their portfolios (SLE: A1, A3).

  • Successful completion of this course meets the graduation requirement for .5 credit in Science or a .5 credit in Technology - not both.
  • Pathway Course P

Experiencing the Natural World through Art & Science 11460 (Project Based Learning STEAM Course) - Oceans Edition (Semester 1) (½ credit) Grade 9-12

This is a project-based course that incorporates STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) into the curriculum. Content work will be technology-based content modules that students can work through during the time interval of the course at their own pace. Students will be creating a fully developed work of art relating to Ocean themes. The first half of the course will focus on 2-D representations and the second half will focus on 3-D representations. Time will be spent in both the Art classroom and Science classroom to develop their global understanding of the topic. With the help of both the Science Teacher and the Art Teacher, students will shape their work into a final product that completely represents the breadth of their knowledge in the content area.

Pathway Course for 2019-2020

Experiencing the Natural World through Art & Science 11462 (Project Based Learning STEAM Course) - Woodlands Edition (Semester 2) (½ credit) Grade 9-12

This is a project-based course that incorporates STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) into the curriculum. Content work will be technology-based content modules that students can work through during the time interval of the course at their own pace. Students will be creating a fully developed work of art relating to Forestry themes. The first half of the course will focus on 2-D representations and the second half will focus on 3-D representations. Time will be spent in both the Art classroom and Science classroom to develop their global understanding of the topic. With the help of both the Science Teacher and the Art Teacher, students will shape their work into a final product that completely represents the breadth of their knowledge in the content area.

Pathway Course for 2019-2020