Transatlantic Workshop on the Economics of Crime

The Transatlantic Workshop on the Economics of Crime (TWEC) aims to bring together researchers from both sides of the Atlantic to present and discuss their work, allowing for an in-depth interaction between those working on the empirical and theoretical analysis of crime and illegal behaviour.

The 11th edition which will be held at the Tinbergen Institute & NSCR in Amsterdam on 26-27 September 2019. The call for papers is available here

Information about the programme of past workshops is available here:

10th TWEC: Sciences-Po (Paris, September 27-28, 2018)

9th TWEC: University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, October 6-7, 2017)

8th TWEC: University of Gothenburg & SOFI (Stockholm, September 30 - October 1, 2016)

7th TWEC: London School of Economics (London, October 2-3, 2015)

6th TWEC: Bocconi University (Milan, October 3–4, 2014)

5th TWEC: Goethe University Frankfurt (October 4-5, 2013)

4th TWEC: Erasmus School of Economics (Rotterdam, October 5-6, 2012)

3rd TWEC: Collegio Carlo Alberto (Turin, October 7-8, 2011)

2nd TWEC: Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods (Bonn, October 8-9, 2010)

1st TWEC: EconomiX, Univeristy of Paris X (Nanterre, September 25-26, 2009)

Here is some history about the workshop:

In 2008, Roberto Galbiati and Christian Traxler started to work on setting-up a series of workshops on empirical Law and Economics, with a focus on the Economics of Crime. The aim was to bring together researchers from both sides of the Atlantic to present and discuss their work, allowing for an in-depth scientific interaction between those interested in the empirical analysis crime and illegal behaviour. In response to the first two meetings in Paris (in 2009) and Bonn (in 2010), many fellows expressed their interest to continue with this format. Starting with 2011, the series of annual workshops was continued under the label “Transatlantic Workshops on the Economics of Crime”. It has ever since been organised yearly, in the 1st weekend of October, in a different top European academic institution and is today the oldest and most important academic forum on the economics of crime on this side of the Atlantic!