Abdul Ben-Hassan

Movie/Game/Character

Movie

  • A fez-hatted artificial/replicant snake manufacturer, identified by "XB71." He directs Deckard to the "Fourth Sector, Chinatown" to a nightclub named The Snake Pit, owned and run by Taffey Lewis. The dialogue between Abdul and Deckard is different between the Workprint and Final Release. For more information visit the BladeZone feature A Blade Runner Work Print companion.

The name of the actor who played Abdul-Ben Hassan was A. Ben Astar

Born: 15 June 1909, Palestine [now Israel] 
Died: 20 October 1988, Tarzana, California, USA. 


Game

  • Referred to as Hasan, he owns shop in Animoid Row. This very defensive character is only found along Animoid Row's northeast corner.



 
Accelerated Decrepitude

Movie/Phrase

 JF Sebastian's condition as described by Pris in the movie.


See:  Methuselah Syndrome.


 
Ajax

Book

A model of lead codpiece.

 

See:  Lead Codpiece


 
Android

Book

Wikipedia Defintion: "An artificially created being that resembles a human being. The word derives from Greek Andr- 'man, human' and the suffix -eides used to mean 'of the species, kind, alike' (from eidos 'species')."

Prevalent in DADoES. Slang use of the term used in the book is "andy(s)". In original screenplay for the movie "android" was the term used, before changing it to "Replicant".

External References: http://www.androidworld.com/

 


 
Andy

Book

Slang use of the term "android" as used in the book DADoES.


See:  Android

 


 
Animoid

Book/Movie/Game

Animal replicants were developed first for use as pets 
and beasts of burden after most real animals became extinct. Term not used in book, nor movie. In the book they were referred to as "electric animals", "artificial animals", and "false-animals".

However, the term was used in an early version of movie script (07/24/1980) describing JF Sebastian's (then J.R. Sebastian) apartment contents "...shelved along the walls and hung from the ceiling is a menagerie of animoids."

 Also, JF appears to be more of a free-lancer in this early script (with Tyrell as his landlord) and drives a vehicle with lettering on the side that reads "J.R. SEBASTIAN - ANIMOID EXPRESS."

 


 
Animoid Row

Game

  • A marketplace housing the "FISH LADY", DRAGONFLY BOOTH, and ABDUL BEN-HASAN'S SNAKE SHOP. 
"Animoid Row, just one of the markets for artificial animals for hard cash."

Movie

  • Where expensive, artificial animals are sold and where Deckard goes with the "snake scale" he's found in Leon's apartment.

Book

  • In the book (and in the movie script)  it was referred to as "Animal Row". (Script 02/23/1981)


                                                               



Baker
 
Game/Character 

Baker interrogates Ray McCoy in Act Three as he is strapped to the LPD Soothsayer. He is an ex-blade runner. Ray commented to Baker that his, "...breath smells like he wiped his ass with his teeth". 

He was a S.I.D. expert on Course of Technique. He was fired from the police force in 2017 

Baker only appears in a cinematic feature. 

Baker is voiced by actor Mark Worden


Barbour, Bill

Book

Bill Barbour, Rick’s neighbor, joins him on the roof of the apartment building. Bill owns a Percheron horse and Rick is quite jealous of the animal. He tells Rick that the horse is expecting a colt and Rick offers to buy it, telling Bill that it is immoral to have more than one animal. Rick insists that it “violates the whole basic theological and moral structure of Mercerism” for Bill to own two animals. Rick reveals that his animal is, in fact, electric and Bill feels pit for him, offering to not tell any of his neighbors this fact. Rick greatly wants a real animal and thinks about how many “andys” he would need to “retire” before he would be able to afford on.*


 
Baty/Batty, Roy

Book/Movie

Book

  • Roy Baty, along with his wife Irmgard, are two of the six androids on the run. It is thought that he was a pharmacist on Mars, although Deckard feels that may have been a cover. In the poop sheet Roy is described as having an "...aggressive, assertive air of ersatz authority. Given to mystical preoccupations, this android proposed the group escape attempt, underwriting it ideologically with a pretentious fiction as to the sacredness of so-called android "life." " 1 

Roy, the leader of the rogue androids, does not force a murderous confrontation with his creator in the book. He remains holed up in Isidore's apartment until Rick hunts him down. 

The Roy Baty character does not have as prominent role in DADoES as does the Roy Batty in Blade Runner



1. DADoES, by PKD Chapter sixteen, page 161


Movie

  • An advanced combat model Nexus 6 Replicant. He is the leader of a group of escaped Replicants from Off-world, on the quest for a longer life span. 

Roy Batty's serial number: N6MAA1816 
1st. digit: Model. N stands for "Nexus" 
2nd. digit: Series. 6 
3rd. Digit: Sex. M = "Male" 
3rd: digit: Physical Grade. A 
4th digit: Mental Grade. A 
5-6 digits: Incept date. January 8, 2016. 

As described by Fancher and Peoples, "[...] BATTY resembles a tradition, the gym instructor, short, cropped hair with the body of a drill sergeant but the eyes are gray and chilling. Roy Batty is a presence of force with a lazy, but acute sense of what goes on around him." 

Roy Batty has the most memorable lines in the movie. His most notable lines are: 

"...if only you could see what I've seen with your eyes." 

"I want more life, fucker! (some versions have: I want more life, father!)"

"You'd better get it up, or I'm gonna have to kill you!" 

"That's the spirit!" 

"Gosh, you've really got some nice toys here." 

"I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. 
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. 
I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate. 
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. 
Time to die."



Bear
Movie/Game Character  

The Bear is a creation of J. F. Sebastian, a "genetic designer" for the Tyrell Corporation, who produces realistic toys. To combat his own loneliness he created automated, humanistic playful 'dolls' that provide him with companionship. J.F. Sebastian is greeted by two of his doll-toys, a miniature, three-foot-high, long-nosed Kaiser Wilhelm dressed in a military uniform, and a teddy bear dressed like Napoleon. They march up to him after he enters the apartment and say:  "Home again, home again, jiggety jig." 


Role performed by actor Kevin Thompson (II).


 
Black Hole Weapons
Movie

The gun Leon Kowalski used against RepDetective Dave Holden at the beginning of Blade Runner was a Black Hole weapon. The gun was designed for knock down power as well as being deadly. Another affect the weapon has is the way it attacks the target, absorbing whatever light is in its path, increasing its power, then completely and fusing the opening and exit wounds. The weapon is made of an undetectible material used only for Off-World combat. 

More about Black Hole Weapons can be read here.


 


Blade Runner 

[1] Movie directed by Ridley Scott. Released in 1982, originally a box-office financial failure, however, it has become an enduring cult classic. 

Awards: 
*Best Art Direction (nom) David Snyder 1982 Academy 
*Best Art Direction (nom) Linda de Scenna 1982 Academy 
*Best Art Direction (nom) Lawrence G. Paull 1982 Academy 
*Best Visual Effects (nom) Douglas Trumbull 1982 Academy 
*Best Visual Effects (nom) David Dryer 1982 Academy 
*Best Visual Effects (nom) Richard Yuricich 1982 Academy 
*Best Cinematography (win) Jordan S. Cronenweth 1982 British Academy Awards 
*Best Costume Design (win) Michael Kaplan 1982 British Academy Awards 
*Best Costume Design (win) Charles Knode 1982 British Academy Awards 
*Best Production Design/Art Direction (win) Lawrence G. Paull 1982 British Academy Awards 
*Best Cinematography (win) Jordan S. Cronenweth 1982 L.A. Film Critics Association 
*Best Cinematography Jordan S. Cronenweth 1982 New York Film Critics Circle 
*Competing Film Ridley Scott 1982 Venice Film Festival 
*Best Dramatic Presentation 1983 Hugo Award 
*Special Achievement Award Lawrence G. Paull, Douglas Trumbull, Syd Mead - For their visual concept (technical prize) 1983 London Critics Circle Film Awards - 
*U.S. National Film Registry (win) 1993 Library of Congress 

Script written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples. Based on the PKD book "DADoES". Music score by Vangelis. Stars Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, and M. Emmet Walsh. 

[2] The term "Blade Runner," used in this film as a designation for people of Deckard's profession, comes originally from a 1974 novel by Alan E. Nourse, "The Bladerunner", the protagonist of which is a smuggler of black-market surgical implements. Nourse's book inspired William S. Burroughs' book, "Bladerunner, A Movie", a script treatment in the form of a novel. Neither Nourse's novel nor Burroughs' had any influence on Ridley Scott's film "Blade Runner", except that Hampton Fancher happened upon a copy of "Bladerunner, A Movie" while Scott was looking for a snappier title for his film. Scott liked the term, and obtained the rights to the title (but not any aspect of the plot). Some editions of Burroughs' book use the spacing "Blade Runner". (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) 

[3] CRL Group PLC computer game, for Commodore 64 and ZX Spectrum, released in 1985. 

[4] Westwood Studios game, based on both the book DADoES and the movie. Advertised as "The First Real-Time 3D Adventure" Released in 1997, it featured the reprise of some of the original cast from the movie, namely, Sean Young, Brion James, James Hong, Joe Turkel, and William Sanderson. (More here )


 
Blade Runner Souvenir Magazine 
Movie/Merchandise 

Published in 1982 by Ira Friedman, Inc., the Blade Runner Souvenir Magazine includes 150 photos and art combined with an overview of the movie. It's divided up into 7 different "sectors", including interviews with Harrison Ford, Ridley Scott, Doug Trumbull & Syd Mead, and an in-depth look at the making of the film. 

More can be read here.



 
Blaster 

Movie 

Hand gun used by Deckard. 

Also referred to as a "PKD Blaster"   

Links:  


The Workings of the Blade Runner Blaster within the Film. 
By Phil Steinschneider and Richard A. Coyle 
A discussion on how the Blaster Appeared to work and a reconciliation of the features of the gun. 




 
 

 

Blake, William 

In the movie Roy Batty is known for numerous memorable lines. Among them is this poetic line said to the character Chew: "Fiery the Angels fell. Deep thunder rolled around their shores burning with the fires of Orc." 

This poetic intro is paraphrased from a poem titled "America a Prophecy" (1793) written by William Blake. 


He was not only a writer, but an artist. And his combining of the two futher enriched the work. To learn more about William Blake: 
A hypermedia archive sponsored by the Library of Congress

 
 
 


 
Blimp
 
Movie

Also referred to as an "Advertising Blimp" 


Large dirigible adorned with spotlights, video screens and a speaker system that floats over the city constantly advertising the benefits of OffWorld Colonization. At least two large television screens broadcast advertisements for "OffWorld" colonies, and a geisha girl who smiles, or eats a cherry, or smokes a cigarette. Smaller screens display the Coca-Cola logo. 

Famously known for it's vocalizations at the start of the move: "A new life awaits you in the Off-World colonies. The chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure. New climate, recreational facilities.....absolutely free. Use your new friend as a personal body servant or a tireless field hand--the custom tailored genetically engineered humanoid replicant designed especially for your needs. So come on America, let's put our team up there...." Added for BRDC: "This annoucement is brought to you by the Shimato Dominguez Corporation - helping America into the New World." 

At one point the blimp is seen through the grid which is the lattice of the full-width skylight of the Bradbury Building broadcasting asian music, (The lyrics tell of the tragic and utter destruction of one Japanese clan by 
another*). 

* Japan: Traditional Vocal and Instrumental Music, Shakuhachi, 
Biwa, Koto, Shamisen" [compact disc] 
Performed by Ensemble Nipponia, 1976 
Electra Asylum Nonesuch Records/Warner Communications Inc.
 
 
 
 

 
  
Boiled Dog
 
Book/Movie/Game
 
One of the few actual terms used in all three formats under the same context. This is a term used in one of the questions asked during a VK session. 

  • Book: "A final question," he said. "Two-part. You are watching an old movie on TV, a movie from before the war. It shows a banquet in progress; the guests are enjoying raw oysters." "Ugh," Rachael said; the needles swung swiftly. "The entree," he continued, "consists of boiled dog, stuffed with rice." 

  • Movie: Deckard: "One more question. You're watching a stage play. A banquet is in progress. The guests are enjoying an appetizer of raw oysters. The entree consists of boiled dog." 

  • Game: Ray: "You're watching an old movie. It shows a banquet in progress. The guests are enjoying raw oysters. The entree consists of boiled dog." 
 

 
 
Boneli Reflex Arc-Test
Book


Similar to the Voigt-Kampff scale, this test is used to determine if a person is a human or a replicant. 

Taken from book: As Resch (Police officer) explains, "The reflex-arc response taking place in the upper ganglia of the spinal column requires several microseconds more in the humanoid robot than in the human nervous system...We try it a number of times, of course. Elapsed time varies in both the andy and the human. But by the time ten reactions have been measured, we believe we have a reliable clue." 

It uses an audio signal or a light-flash. The subject presses a button responding to the questions and the elapsed time is measured. 

As with the Voigt-Kampff, the bone marrow test confirms the recipient is a replicant.


 

  
 
Bonsai Tree
 
Movie 
 
Deckard has one in his apartment. There's also one (the same one?) on Tyrell's office desk where Deckard first meets Rachael. 

Speculation:
This might signify the interference in the natural development of a living organism - a parallel with Tyrell's interference with the natural development of the Replicants. Alternatively, the trees could just be there for decoration!
  
 

  
 
Bradbury Building 
 
Movie/Game/Location 

The Bradbury Building is the home of J.F Sebastian, and is featured in the climactic chase scene nearing the end of the movie. It is in the ninth sector. 

More can be learned here

In the Westwood game there will be a clue (DNA sample). You'll be able to roam the many corners of his humble apartment and see some of the items from the scenes in the movie, i.e. the boiling eggs, various toys, and the Kaiser and Bear! You'll interact with J.F. Sebastian too.

 


 
Brain Implant 

Movie
 
Perhaps more accurately termed memory implants, these are a set of virtual reality scenarios made to create a past in Replicants. 

In the movie Eldon Tyrell explains why they are used in the Nexus 6 model to Deckard: "If we gift them with a past ... we create a cushion or pillow for their emotions and consequently we can control them better." 

Later in the movie when Rachael meets Deckard at his apartment she try's to prove to him that she is not a replicant. Deckard finally reveals to her: 
"Implants. They are not your memories, they belong to Tyrell's sixteen year old niece." 1 

"Implants! Those aren't your memories. They're somebody else's. They're Tyrell's niece's." 2 



1 Screenplay February 23, 1981 

2 From the movie. 


 
Bryant, Harry
 
Book/Movie
 
Book
 
  • In the book, Deckards' superior is Police Inspector Harry Bryant.  He is described as, "...jug-eared and redheaded, sloppily dressed but wise-eyed and conscious of nearly everything of any importance...".
 
 
Movie
 
  • In the movie, Deckard's ex-boss is Captain Bryant. Ex-alcoholic, rude, and shows no sympathy when it comes to Replicants.
 
 
plays the role of Bryant.





Bryant's Office 
 
Movie/Game/Location 

Captain Harry Bryant's office at LAPD headquarters. Actual filming location for this was at Union Station in Los Angeles, CA 

This is the setting where Deckard is given the assignment of hunting down the four Replicants. 

In the game Lieutenant Guzza is filling in for Captain Bryant. You'll want Ray to check in on occasion. Depending on your gameplay, there may be a weapon shipment list on the desk.

 
 

 
 
Buffalo Hunter Lamp
 
Movie 

Bryant's hunting lamp, on his desk in the movie. Each panel of the lampshade has a photo of a hunter standing next to his 'kill'. 

Speculation: 
Possibly signifies the Blade Runner and the Replicant (the hunter and his trophy).

 
 

 
 
Bullet Bob 
 
Game/Character 

Character in the Westwood Blade Runner computer game. He owns 'Bullet Bob's Runner Surplus' near Animoid Row. He is first (possibly) brought to your attention by a complaint from the Egyptian snake-maker of Animoid Row, claiming that Bullet Bob was threatening him. 

The Ray McCoy character can buy some "heavy duty" ammo there, and also give Bullet Bob the Voight-Kampff test. 

Bullet Bob is only found in his shop. 

The actor who does the voice of Bullet Bob is Vincent Schiavelli.

 
 

 
Bullet Bob's Runner Surplus
 
Game/Location 

Gun shop owned by Bullet Bob, located between Animoid Row and Hawker's Circle.

 
 


Buster Friendly (Buster Friendly and His Friendly Friends)
 
Book

An endless talk show which broadcasts 23 hours a day, (the additional one hour being a religious sign-off, ten minutes of silence, and then a religious sign-on), both on television and radio, that provides an alternative reality for many people. The show is prominent throughout the book and is a major influence in the battle between the differences (or similarities) of being human and being an android. 

Isidore rather astutely remarks that "Buster Friendly and Mercerism are competing for our psychic souls" (ch. 7).

 

 
 
B-263-54
 
Movie

Rick Deckard's badge number. He mentions it twice in the movie. First time to the police officer, after he retires Zhora. Then he says it to another policeman whilst in the spinner, after he has been told about Tyrell and JF's murder over the Vid-Phone. 

In "The Illustrated Blade Runner", published by Blue Dolphin (1982), which contains the complete screenplay, after retiring Zhora it is written he says B26354. In the spinner it is written he says 26364. 

In the movie Deckard says one set of numbers. "B-263-54."


                                                               




Cambodian Lady
 
Movie/Game


Movie

  • Deckard brings fish scale to her whilst searching for it's maker/manufacturer. 

Actress
Kimiko Hiroshige 
Born: 3 July 1912 
Hilo, Hawaii, USA 
Died: 7 September 1989 
Los Angeles County, California, USA 

Filmography
China Beach (1988) (TV) .... Vietnamese Woman 
Steele Justice (1987) .... Grandmother 
Blade Runner (1982) .... Cambodian lady 
Honky Tonk Freeway (1981) .... Mrs. Naguki 
Around the World in Eighty Days (1956) (uncredited) .... Extra 
Navy Wife (1956) (uncredited) .... Woman 
... aka Mother, Sir! (UK) 

Notable TV Guest Appearances
"Alice" in episode: "Too Many Robert Goulets" (episode # 5.4) 16 November 1980 
"M*A*S*H" playing "Korean Woman" in episode: "The Winchester Tapes" (episode # 6.5) 18 October 1977 
"M*A*S*H" playing "Korean Woman" in episode: "Fade Out, Fade In" (episode # 6.1) 20 September 1977 
"Happy Days" playing "Aunt Sumi" in episode: "Arnold's Wedding" (episode # 3.24) 2 March 1976 
(reference IMDb)
 
Game

  • Referred to as "Fish Lady". 
Voice by Karen Maruyama.

Capillary Dilation 

One of the measurements taken by the Voight-Kampff test induced by a series of 'moral dilemmas' posed by the investigator. 

Refer to Voigt-Kampff .

 

 
CARS/C.A.R.S. 

Game

Citizens Against Replicant Slavery. 

This is a Replicant sympathizer group advocating for equal Rights. The character Spencer Grigorian was the leader of this group.


 
Chickenhead
Book

A derogatory slang for "Specials" used in DADoES, referring to a person with a deficient intelligence. 

In the same category as some other politically incorrect terms mentioned in DADoES, i.e. "deteriorated specials" and "antheads". However, "chickenhead" is more commonly used. 

The criteria for a person to be considered a chickenhead is failing to pass the minimum mental faculties test to emigrate OffWorld. 

Isidore is almost constantly called, or referred to as, a chickenhead. 

Synonymous derogatory slangs: "retard", "moron", "idiot", "imbecile", and "feeble-minded". 

Excerpt from DADoES: "There exists chickenheads infinitely stupider than Isidore, who could hold no jobs at all, who remained in custodial institutions quaintly called "Institute of Special Trade Skills of America," the word "special" having to get in there somehow, as always." 

See also "Specials".


 

 
 
C-beams 

Movie 

Line from movie spoken by Roy Batty: 

"I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near Tanhauser Gate. All those moments will be lost ... in time, like tears in rain. Time ... to die." 

Lots of speculation as to its' meaning, from a "special type of laser" to "c = the speed of light". 

The most likely explanation is that it "sounded" far-out and unimaginable. As Rutger Hauer said in Future Noir, "I loved those images he (David Peoples) came up with 'c-beams glittering near the Tanhauser gate...' I thought they were really interesting, even if you didn't understand them."

 
 


 
Dr. Hannibal Chew
 
Movie/Game/Character 

Known to Blade Runner enthusiasts as "Chew", he's a genetic engineer. Chew designs Replicant eyes under contract for the Tyrell Corporation, and owns "Eye Works". 

In the Westwood game Chew is only found at the Eye Works in DNA Row. 

Actor James Hong acted the role of Chew in the movie and did the voice in the Westwood game. 

See also: 
DNA Row 
Eye Works 
Tyrell Corporation 
Westwood game

 

 
China Bar
 
Game/Location 

The China Bar is located at "Hawker's Circle". The bar provides, depending on gameplay, (besides a quick libation for Ray) a security camera recording and "dat drink" for a homeless guy. 

The China Bar represents the bar in Chinatown where Deckard, in the movie, purchases a bottle of Tsing Tao after retiring Zhora, and where Gaff and Bryant meet up to inform him to add Rachael to the list of Retirees. 

The similarities between the movie and the Westwood game are the bartenders appearance, i.e. the eye-patch and physique (Although in the game the character is male, whilst in the movie a female), and the background music (Though not the same but the games' is representative of Vangelis' tune-"One more kiss, dear") . 

The actor who does the voice of the Bartender is Jeff Garlin. (Also does the voice of Lieutenant Guzza) 

Screenshot of the China Bar.
 
 

 
 
Chinatown
 
Movie/Game/Location 

Movie

  • The Chinatown of Los Angeles 2019 is the setting of some of the most unforgettable images associated with the movie Blade Runner. Chinatown brings forth images of the adverstising blimp, the noodle bar, bicycle riders, neon dragon sign, futuristic cars, lighted umbrellas, traffic lights instructing pedestrians to either "Walk now" or "Don't walk", and artificial ostrichs, among the most diverse individuals i.e. Hari Krishnas, nuns, punks, midgets, Asians, Africans, Caucasians, Hispanics, and what-have-you. 

According to an article in the Blade Runner Souvenir Magazine (Released 1982), "Three quarters of the extras on the streets are Chinese. The audience may simply think a certain part of this film takes place in the Chinatown district and never question it. In fact, Ridley's argument at the time was that the Oriental population, with as much of a numerical advantage as they already have, would have even more weight of numbers forty years in the future." 

The only mention of Chinatown in the script is when Deckard is interrogating Abdul Hassan. Hassan's reply to who he sold the snake in question to is: "Taffy Lewis's, down in First Sector, Chinatown." 


Game

  • In the Westwood game Chinatown is the region where Howie Lee's is. The LAPD are regular patrons. Various clues will lead you to Howie Lee's. Besides Howie Lee himself, Gordo and Zuben are other characters that may be there to interact with. 

The Yukon Hotel is also located in Chinatown. The characters you'll meet there are the Yukon desk clerk and Leon.

 

 
 
Cityspeak
Movie/Game

The language used in the movie. The collage of languages represented are Japanese, Hungarian, English, Spanish, Korean, German, and French. 
Famously introduced in the first scene with Deckard, at the Noodle Bar, first with the Sushi Master then with Gaff. 

It is heard spoken throughout the film and the Westwood game in the background. 

An example from the movie: 
Policeman: Hey, idi-wa. [Korean: "Hey, come here."] 

Gaff: Monsieur, azonnal kövessen engem bitte. [French-Hungarian-German: "Sir, follow me immediately please!" (Hungarian:- "azonnal" - means immediately; "kövessen" - means follow imperative; "engem" - means me. And of course "Monsieur" is French for Sir and "bitte" is German for please.)] 

Sushi Master: He say you under arrest, Mr. Deckard. 

Deckard: You got the wrong guy, pal. 

Gaff: Lófaszt, nehogy már. Te vagy a Blade ... Blade Runner. [Hungarian: "Horsedick, no way! You are the Blade ... Blade Runner."] 

Sushi Master: He say you 'Brade Runner'. 

Deckard: Tell him I'm eating.

 

There was also a Blade Runner fanzine by the name of CITYSPEAK, created by Sara Campbell in 1982. More about it here



 

 
  
Clovis 
 
Game/Character 


A Nexus-6 Replicant in Westwood's Blade Runner game. He is philosophical and pretentious. 

Clovis' role is similar to that of Roy Batty's in the book and movie in that they both are in leadership positions in their "group", are philosophical, recite a verse of poetry, and have same demeanour. 

Clovis is seen in the cinematic features at first. Ray will have first glimpse of him in video footage from a surveillance camera and photos. He'll meet him when you are close to solving the case. 


The actor who does the voice of Clovis is Mark Rolston.  He also does the voice of a transient.

 
 

 
Crazylegs Larry
 
Game/Character 

Larry Hersh, better know as "Crazylegs Larry", is the owner of a used car lot in Hysteria Hall in Westwood's Blade Runner game. He's not the most helpful bloke at first. However, depending on gameplay, he may be able to help Ray get out of a jam in the end. He is only found at Larry's Used Cars. 


The actor doing the voice of Crazylegs Larry is Joe Kucan.
 
 

 
 
Crazylegs Larry's Used Cars 

Game 

A used car dealership in Hysteria Hall, owned by Crazylegs Larry. There Ray will converse with Larry in Act 3. Ray may also be in need of a car in future Acts, this will be the place to go.

 
 

 
Crystal Steele 
 
Game/Character 

Character in the Westwood Blade Runner computer game. License number BR6134. She is a Rep Detect who ultimately sticks to the departments' attitude towards replicants, cold-blooded and ruthless. She works alone, and is adamant about that. 

Ray McCoy encounters her in the beginning of the game. Crystal's nickname for Ray is "Slim". Their cases overlap one another which may either help or hinder Ray. Depending on your gameplay you may either remain indifferent to her, earn her respect, be killed by her, or walk off together into the slum-set. 


The actor who does the voice of Crystal Steele is Lisa Edelstein

BladeZone features an exclusive interview with Lisa Edelstein.


                                    



Iran Deckard 

Book 

In the book DADoES Iran is Rick Deckard's wife. 

"PKD has created a world of contrasts where the people are valuable only as mechanisms to be manipulated, but any real meaning to their lives has been stripped away. In the first pages of “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep” Iran Deckard is peevishly determined to feel her own feelings and seems almost immature compared to Rick Deckard’s cheerful optimism. As the story continues Iran’s action seems almost a heroic rebellion against the regime of controlling forces. Later Iran’s dependence on the other mechanical means* of avoidance reveals that she is not heroic after all."1 



*Referring to the empathy box. 

1. "What Makes a Human", by Deb Cutler 
 


 
 
Rick Deckard 

Book/Movie 

Book 

  • The main character of DADoES, Rick Deckard, is a bounty hunter for the San Francisco Police Department. The opening of the story introduces the reader to Rick and his wife Iran. 

At the police station Deckard learns that the department's chief bounty hunter, Dave Holden, has been incapacitated by a Nexus-6. Deckard asks to take over his caseload to track and hunt the six remaining Nexus-6 models. 

Midway through the book, while Deckard is trying to decide if Phil Resch was an android, Deckard questioned his own humanity. Deckard had Resch conduct the Voigt-Kampff test on him to ensure he wasn't an android. He passed 

There are a number musical references that Deckard makes throughout the book. Almost all of those refer to roles in Mozart's operas, "The Magic Flute" and "Don Giovanni". PKD plants the love of music in characters he tends to like or approve of; in this case, he seems to suggest a connection between love of music and the capacity for empathy, which would weigh in on the side of Deckard being human. 

Movie 

  • Rick Deckard is the central character of the film. He is a retired Blade Runner. He is called back to the department and given the assignment of tracking down and "retiring" four Replicants. 

There have been lengthy debates on whether Deckard is human or a Replicant. The "Deck-a-Rep" debates can be found throughout the net. The consensus is he is a Replicant. 



FYI 

  • Although he wasn't in Westwood's Blade Runner game, references are made to Deckard. 
  • Harrison Ford plays the role of Deckard in Blade Runner. 


 
 

 
 
 
Dektora 
 
Game/Character 

Dektora is a character in the Westwood game. She may be either human or replicant, depending on your gameplay. She is a dancer at Early Q's at Nightclub Row. The only way to determine if she's a rep or not is to test her with the Voigt-Kampff machine. 

One of the game endings has Ray McCoy with Dektora together escaping in a car, depending on your gameplay. 

Dektora is voiced by actor Signy Coleman

 

 
 
Dermo Design 
 
Game/Location 

From the Westwood game, Dermo Design is located at DNA Row. Moraji is the engineer there under contract with the Tyrell Corporation. He builds skin for Replicants. 

On the second floor of Dermo Design is Luther and Lance's apartment.

 
 

 
 
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Book by Philip K. Dick



Often abbreviated DADoES

Originally published in 1968 

Basis for the 1982 film Blade Runner 

Plot Summary: 
By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans. 

Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in. 

Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results. 

Taken from the 
Philip K. Dick Official Site with permission. 

-1968 - Nebula Award Best Novel (nominee) 
-1998 - Locus Poll Award, All-Time Best SF Novel before 1990 (Place: 51) 

Footnote:  Post-1982 editions of the novel have been published under the title Blade Runner (Sub-titled "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?") , and changed the year it takes place from 1992 to 2021.




Philip K. Dick 

Philip Kindred Dick is the author of "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" (DADoES), the book Blade Runner is based on. 

Often known by his initials PKD, he was born December 16, 1928. His works are characterized by an eroding sense of reality, with protagonists often discovering that those close to them (or even they themselves) are secretly androids, aliens, supernatural beings, brainwashed spies, hallucinations, dead, from another time or a combination of these. These characteristic themes and the atmosphere of paranoia they generate are sometimes described as "Dickian" or "Phildickian."   Fans of Philip K. Dick's work are referred to as "Dick-Heads".

PKD published 44 novels, 121 short stories, and numerous essays and poetry. 

Hugo Awards 
Best Novel 
1963 - The Man in the High Castle (winner) 
1975 - Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said (nominee) 
Best Novelette 
1968 - Faith of Our Fathers (nominee) 

Nebula Awards 
Best Novel 
1965 - Dr. Bloodmoney (nominee) 
1965 - The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch (nominee) 
1968 - Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (nominee) 
1974 - Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said (nominee) 
1982 - The Transmigration of Timothy Archer (nominee) 

John W. Campbell Memorial Award 
Best Novel 
1975 - Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said (winner) 

Dick died on March 2, 1982, the result of a combination of recurrent strokes accompanied by heart failure. In a 1981 entry in his Exegesis ( His journal "In the Pursuit of VALIS: Selections from the Exegesis") PKD wrote as focused a self-assessment of his aims and talents as a writer as can be found in any of his journals, letters, essays, and interviews: 

"I am a fictionalizing philosopher, not a novelist; my novel & story-writing ability is employed as a means to formulate my perception. The core of my writing is not art but truth. Thus what I tell is the truth, yet I can do nothing to alleviate it, either by deed or explanation. Yet this seems somehow to help a certain kind of sensitive troubled person, for whom I speak. I think I understand the common ingredient in those whom my writing helps: they cannot or will not blunt their own intimations about the irrational, mysterious nature of reality, &, for them, my corpus is one long ratiocination regarding this inexplicable reality, an integration & presentation, analysis & response & personal history." 

Philip K. Dick Fan Site: http://www.philipkdickfans.com/main.htm 

Motion Pictures based on PKD's books/short stories: 

Blade Runner (1982) 
Based on "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" 

Total Recall (1990) 
Based on "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale" 

Confessions d'un Barjo (French, 1992) 
Based on "Confessions of a Crap Artist" 

Screamers (1995) 
Based on "Second Variety" 

Impostor (2001) 
Based on "Impostor." 

Minority Report (2002) 
Based on "The Minority Report." 

Paycheck (December 25, 2003) 
Based on "Paycheck." 

A Scanner Darkly (July 7, 2006) 
Based on "A Scanner Darkly" 

Next (2007) 
Based on "The Golden Man"

The Adjustment Bureau (2011)
Based on "The Adjustment Team"

Radio Free Albemuth (2012)
Based on "Radio Free Albemuth" 

Total Recall (2012)
(A remake of the 1990 movie of the same title.)
Based on "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale" 

Flow My tears, the Policeman Said (TBD)
Based on "Flow My tears, the Policeman Said" 

The Man in the High Castle (TBD)
Based on "The Man in the High Castle"





Director's Cut 

This is a version of Blade Runner said to be more true to Ridley Scott's initial vision than the Domestic Cut. Released on September 11, 1992 to fifty-eight theaters around the U.S. and later on video, laser disc and on DVD, it replaced the Domestic Cut for theatrical and television showings, as well as DVD releases. 

This version has 4 major differences. 

>Deckard's narration is removed. 
>The extra violence seen in the International Cut was cut from this version. 
>No happy ending scene 
>Features a unicorn vision while Deckard is drunk & playing the piano. This is not found in any other version. 

For more information on the different verions click here

See also: 
>Domestic Cut 
>International Cut
>The Final Cut

 

 
Domestic Cut 

This version opened nationwide in 1,290 theaters on June 25th, 1982. Also referred to as the Original Version" (OV), it contains the voice-over narration and the "Ride-off-into-the-sunset" happy Hollywood-ending. 


For more information on the different verions click here

See also: 
>Director's Cut 
>International Cut




DNA Row
 
Game/Location 

In the Westwood game, DNA Row is the section containing Dermo Design and Eye Works. There you will meet Moraji, Chew, and possibly run into Gaff. You will also learn of Luther and Lance, and how to get to the Bradbury Hotel, amongst other clues.


 


 
Dragonfly 

Game 

The Dragonfly is a theme that runs throughout the story in the Westwood game. 

Dragonfly anklet: A clue in Act 1 at the Runciter crime scene from the surveillance camera disc. Zoom in to Lucy's ankle. 

Dragonfly earring: A clue found in Act 2 at the Tyrell Corporation Grav Test control room, at the scene of the Eisenduller crime scene on the floor. Also can be seen worn by Sadik in the Tyrell security camera footage. 

Dektora's Dragonfly dance: In Act 3 at Early Q's Dektora has a dance scene where she is dressed as a dragonfly (If you click on her while she is dancing you will be thrown out of the club!). After her dance have Ray interview her in her dressing room. There Ray will find she has a dragonfly belt. 

Dragonfly collection: Depending on gameplay, in Act 3 Ray may be able to get into Early Q's Lair where he will find the receipt for the collection, containing an earring, belt, and anklet. 

See also:  Dragonfly Booth.


 


 
Dragonfly Booth 

Game/Location 

In the Westwood game, the Dragonfly Booth is located in Animoid Row. The Insect Dealer will ask Ray to stop by later, after she asks one of her connections about it. 

See also: 
>Dragonfly 
>Insect Dealer




Dystopia 

From: Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary 

Main Entry: dys·to·pia 
Pronunciation: dis-'tO-pE-& 
Function: noun 
Etymology: New Latin, from dys- + -topia (as in utopia) 
1 : an imaginary place where people lead dehumanized and often fearful lives. 


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia




                                     



Early Q
 
Game 

Owner of Early Qs' Nightclub. Only found at Early Q's Club, along Nightclub Row. 

The actor who did the voice of Early is Stephen Root.  

See also: 
Early Q's Club 
Nightclub Row 
Westwood game

 

 
 
Early Q's Club
 
Game 

Early Q's club is located at Nightclub Row. Ray makes a visit here in Act 3. This is where Ray meets Early Q and Dektora, as well as finding some more clues. 

See also: 
Early Q 
Dektora 
Ray McCoy
Nightclub Row 
Westwood game

 

 
Marcus Eisenduller 

Game 

Marcus Eisenduller is only seen (alive) in a cinematic feature. Dr. Eisenduller worked in the Grav Test Lab in the Tyrell Building. Ray is called on the scene to investigate the murder. Clues will be found both in the lab and outside the lab, near the large computer terminal. 


Michael McShane does the voice of Marcus Eisenduller. 

 


Empathy
 
Book/Movie/Game
 
Empathy (from the Greek εμπάθεια, "to make suffer") is commonly defined as one's ability to recognize, perceive and directly experientially feel the emotion of another. As the states of mind, beliefs, and desires of others are intertwined with their emotions, one with empathy for another may often be able to more effectively define another's modes of thought and mood. Empathy is often characterized as the ability to "put oneself into another's shoes", or experiencing the outlook or emotions of another being within oneself, a sort of emotional resonance. 1.
 
External Links:


 

 
Empathy Box 

Book 

One requires a black empathy box for "fusion" with Mercer. By clutching it's handles you are taken into a "virtual reality" world. Used in the religion referred to as Mercerism, this device allows humans to connect with each other in order to ease the haunting burdens of loneliness and despair. “ 


See also:  Mercerism.



 
Empathy Test 

General/Concept 

The simple term for the Voigt-Kampff test. According to Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, the name Voigt-Kampff refers to two experts in android science, who invented or enhanced the reaction scales for the test. The test was developed to determine whether a person is a replicant or a human being. It is a serious of probing questions designed to invoke an emotional/empathic response. This is essential part of the story in Blade Runner, as replicants lack, or only have a moderately developed empathy level. This is why replicants are more inclined to acts of violence or sadism. 

Empathy is a very important if not the most important issue in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. In the book the lack of emotional response in a replicant is called "Flattening of affect" (pronounced "AFF-ect") which means an objective absence of normal emotional responses, without evidence of depression or psychomotor retardation. 

The Nexus-6 replicants were so advanced that they could now develope their own emotional responses and could sometimes 'fake' an empathic response. The newest VK test could measure the reaction times looking for an unusually slow response that would indicate that the subject is consciously 'faking' it. 


Speculation:
Rachael had implanted memories to soften the blow, so to speak, of her developing emotional responses. It took over 100 questions for Deckard to determine she was a replicant. It's conceivable that a Nexus 6 or Nexus 7 could easily fake a VK test if they had the proper memories implanted.
 

See:  Voight-Kampff Test




 
Esper Photo Analysis
 
Movie/Game

The Esper Machine is a voice-operated computer used to analyze photographs. The Esper turns a photograph into a three-dimensional capture, enabling you to zoom in and navigate through the dimensions detectable. 



FYI
Latest technology - (April 2011)

Digital imaging: An unusual new type of camera analyses the reflections of a laser pulse to do the seemingly impossible.

In standard flash photography a burst of light strikes a subject, and some of it bounces back to the camera to create an image. This device, developed by a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is similar, but with one crucial difference. Instead of recording light reflected directly, it records light that has been reflected several times on the way back.

More here.



 
Eye Works
 
Movie/Game 

Movie

  • Hannibal Chew's laboratory where he designs eyes for the Tyrell Corporation's Replicants. This is the setting where Roy and Leon interrogate Chew about data concerning Replicant morphology, longevity and incept dates. 

FYI 
There was supposed to be a scene with Chew, according to James Hong, where Deckard arrives with a couple of other cops to the crime scene in the eye lab. By that time Chew has turned into a statue of ice. When one of the cops happens to knock him over Chew shatters into a million pieces. The scene was never filmed. 


FYI
Ever wonder what Chew is talking about to himself prior to Roy and Leon entering his lab? 

Script 
Chew: [ ???] [ Chinese for: "Ha yes! So little time." ] 

[ Chew examines an eye under a microscope ] 

Chew: [ ??? ] [ Chinese for: "Ha, ha! So beautiful." ] 

[ Roy and Leon enter Chew's lab ] 

Chew: [ ??? ] [ Chinese for: "Ha, ha! Beautiful indeed." ] 

[ Leon tugs at the hoses connected to Chew's heated fur coat. ] 

Chew: [ ??? ] [ Chinese for: "Where did you come from? What the hell do you think you are doing?" ] 

[ Chew speaks into his coat-lapel microphone. ] 

Chew: [ ??? ] [ Chinese for: "Ah - Chong, come quickly." ] 

Roy: Fiery the angels fell. Deep thunder rode around their shores, burning with the fires of Orc. 

Chew: [ ??? ]. You not come here. Illegal. [ pause ] Hey. Hey. [ ??? ] Cold! Those are my eyes! Freezing! 


Game
 
  • Located at DNA Row. There Ray can talk with Chew. Ask Chew about Tyrell, Moraji, the Twins, Lance's Envelope, and J.F. Sebastian. You can then find Sebastian by entering the alley to the left of Chew's building. 


See also: 
Chew 
Leon 
Roy 
Ray 
DNA Row 
Tyrell Corporation 
J.F. Sebastian 
Moraji 
Lance and Luther


                                                              




Final Cut

Blade Runner: The Final Cut. 

Ridley Scott's definitive Final Cut, including extended scenes and never-before-seen special effects. It's theatrical debut was in Venice, Italy, September 2007. It has been shown in select theatres around the world starting in November 2007 through to 2008.  Home viewing released December 2007. Formats available: five-disc Ultimate Collector's Edition DVD, four-disc Collector's Edition DVD, two-disc Special Edition DVD, five-disc Ultimate Collector's Edition Blu-ray, five-disc Complete Collector's Edition Blu-ray, five-disc Ultimate Collector's Edition HD DVD, five-disc Complete Collector's Edition HD DVD.



 
Fish Dealer 
 
Game/Character 

If you make Ray bring the scale from Leon's bathtub to Fish Lady on Animoid Row, she'll tell you the same thing she told Deckard in the movie: "This not fish scale. This SNAKE scale!" 

Also referred to as "Fish Lady". 
Voice by Karen Maruyama 
See definition: "Cambodian lady"
Future Noir 

Movie/Reference 

Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner by Paul M. Sammon 

It is referred to as the "Blade Runner Bible". It was a seven-year odyssey that would test the stamina and the imagination of writers, producers, special effects wizards, and the most innovative art directors and set designers in the industry. Packed with names, places, dates, fascinating facts, and a trivia cornucopia it makes for an excellent resource and reference tool. 

The book has 441 pages in 18 chapters, with nine appendices containing interviews, production details, the cast list, etc. Published by Harper Paperbacks. 

Read more at Amazon.com

In 2007, to commemorate the twenty-fith anniversay of the release of Blade Runner, a second edition hard cover of this book was released.  It contains an additional 70,000 words of new material, including new interviews.  It was only released in the U.K. and in Japan.


                                                               




 G

Gaff
 
Movie/Game 

Movie 

  • Actor Edward James Olmos played the role of Gaff in the movie Blade Runner. The character is known for his origami creations. Throughout the film Gaff trails Deckard. Gaff looks as if he's studying Deckard at times...almost testing him. Gaff is another blade runner. He seems to know what Deckard is going to do before he does it, leaving as clues an origami chicken, an anatomically correct origami man, and later an origami unicorn. Do Gaff’s actions prove that Deckard is also a replicant, as some would say? That’s up for debate, but Gaff is an inarguably haunting character despite the brevity of his lines. 


Game 

  • You'll come across Gaff throughout the game. During a conversation with Ray he may provide you with some important clues. He may leave Ray an origami of his own. 
The actor doing the voice of Gaff is Victor Gardell

 
Speculation:

  • The Number 3.
  • Three origami creations.   
  • Along with the Christain themes throughout Blade Runner, three represents The Holy Trinity in Christian doctrine (or trinity in general), is God both a single entity and three entities, the Father, the Son and the Spirit. 
  • Bad luck is often said to "come in threes". 
  • The phrase "Third time's a charm" usually means the third time a person attempts something, they will succeed.
  • Fairy Tales have a prominent pattern in the number Three (i.e. 3 bears, 3 pigs, 3 Billy goats gruff, 3 notes to the Pied Piper, 3 kittens, Cinderella and her 2 sisters, 3 wishes, 3 characters, 3 tasks to be performed, travel to the third bend in the road, 3 blind mice, etc.).  William Shakespeare's, Macbeth, the number three emerges most frequently, (The Three Witches, Macbeth approaches the witches and asks three questions, The witches tell Macbeth three predictions, etc.). The three Norns (Urd {That which has become}, Verdandi {That which is becoming} and Skuld {That which shall come} ). 

What do Gaff's origami figures mean? 
  • Chicken- Insinuating that Deckard lacks courage to accept the job, willingly. It could be viewed as an unconsious motivator for Deckard to take the job. 
  • Stick Man- May suggest Deckard's letting his feelings for Rachael get in the way of the investigation.   However, in light of footage released with the "Final Cut", it may suggest that Gaff knew/sensed that Leon was hiding in the bathroom.
  • Unicorn - Refer here.


External Related Link: 
by Paolo Terno  



 
 
George Gleason
 
Book
 
He is a bounty hunter introduced by name to Deckard in Chapter Ten when Deckard is brought to the 'andy' Hall of Justice on Mission Street.  He is only mentioned when Deckard is being questioned whether he knows fellow bounty hunters Gleason and Resch.
  
 

 
 
Gordo
 
Game 

Gordo Frizz is a comedian who performs at Taffy Lewis' bar in Nightclub Row. Ray will first meet him in Act 1 at Howie Lee's sitting at the counter. He may be either a Replicant or human, depending on your gameplay. 

The actor doing the voice of Gordo is Bruno Oliver




Grav Test Lab
 
Game 

The Gravitation Test Laboratory at Tyrell Corporation is where Marcus Eisenduller worked. It becomes a crime scene where Ray will find clues to the case. 




 
Spencer Grigorian 

Game 

He is the leader of a Replicant sympathizer group called CARS (Citizens Against Replicant Slavery). Ray may first hear of Grigorian via Crystal's interview with him uploaded to the Mainframe. Ray will have an opportunity to ask Grigorian about the protest, CARS, and then VK him in Act 2. 

Grigorian is only seen in the lockup area of the LAPD. 


Terry Jourden does the voive of Spencer Grigorian. 

 


Grozzi Corporation
 
Book
 
An android manufacturer.  The W-4 model was briefly mentioned in the book.



 
Edison Guzza
 
Game 


Lieutenant Guzza is filling in for Captain Byrant, who is taking sick leave. Have Ray check in with him from time to time. 

The actor who provided the voice for Guzza is Jeff Garlin

See also: 
Westwood game 
Bryant


                                                                


 
H


Hanoi
Game

The bouncer at Early Q's who refuses Ray to let him see Early.

Only seen at Early Q's.

Bill Wade does the voice of Hanoi.

 

 
Hawkers Circle
 
Game 

Ray will visit Hawker's Circle in Act 2. The Green Pawn, China Bar, Kingston Kitchens and Bullet Bob's are all at Hawker's Circle. Ray will want to return several times to gather up clues and locate the entrances to the sewers.
 



Dave Holden 

Movie/Book/Character 

Book

  • Holden is the department's chief bounty hunter. He is first mentioned in the book under similar circumstances as in the movie, "...in Mount Zion Hospital with a laser track through his spine." The android that shot Holden is similar to the Replicant from the movie (worked in "waste disposal" and Max "appeared" to be on the low-end of the intelligence scale.) only in the book his name was Max Polokov. As a result of Holden's hospitalization Deckard takes on his assignments. 


Movie

  • Holden, a Blade Runner, was sent to the Tyrell Corporation to test new employees under the premise that there might be Replicants amongst them. While administering the Voigt-Kampff test on Leon Kowalski, Holden was shot before the test was through. There were to be two other scenes in the movie where Deckard visits Holden in the hospital, but they were dropped. 

  • Mentions in the Westwood game: 

>Ray finds Holden's badge in Leon's hotel room. 

>At Bullet Bob's, Bob mentioned to Ray that he was "kinda friends' with Davy Holden." 


Morgan Paull played the role of Dave Holden in movie. 

Exclusive BladeZone interview can be read here






Howie Lee

Game/Character 

Howie Lee runs the sushi bar in Chinatown in Westwood's Blade Runner game. He is only found there and welcomes Rays patronage. 


The actor who does the voice of Howie Lee is Toru Nagai. He was also the character model for the Howie Lee character.




Howie Lee's 

Game/Location 

Howie Lee's is a sushi bar located in Chinatown in Westwood's Blade Runner game. You are led there by a clue you found at Runciter's (Chopstick wrapper). You can speak with Howie Lee and ask about his chef, Zuben. And you can interview Zuben. You'll also run into a customer of Lee's named Gordo. 


Howie Lee's represents the noodle bar in the movie Blade Runner where we first meet Deckard.



Hysteria Hall

Game 

Ray will visit Hysteria Hall in Act 3. The first folks Ray will encounter are Mia and Murray, they own the lichen dog stand in front of Hysteria Hall. They offer up a clue. 

Then there is Hysteria Hall arcade, where Ray may run into Lucy. 

Next door to the arcade is the used car dealership Crazylegs Larry. There Ray will converse with Larry. Ray may also be in need of a car in future Acts, this will be the place to go.


                                                               





Insect Dealer
 
Game 

Also referred to as the Peruvian Lady, she runs the Dragonfly booth in Animoid Row. Ray will be referred to her from the Fish Lady (a.k.a Fish Dealer). The Peruvian Lady will offer insight on the dragonfly jewelry. 

Myriam Tupert did the voice of Insect Dealer. 
See also Dragonfly Booth
 
 


Institution of Special Trade Skills of America
 
Book
 
An institution where "Specials" are sent who cannot hold jobs.
 
 
 

 
International Cut 

Shown outside the U.S. in 1982 and later released on video and laser disc.

This is a more violent version of the film and is the BR version seen by most. 

>Tyrell's death scene is more graphic with two additional shots of Batty's thumbs poking Tyrell's eyes. 

>Additional footage of the fight between Deckard and Pris. This version shows Pris inserting two fingers into Deckard's nose and pulling it backward. It also shows Deckard shooting Pris 3 times to kill her, whereas the Domestic & Director's Cut versions only show him shooting her twice. 

>Additional shot of Batty pushing the nail through the palm of his hand and then showing it come through the back of it. 

>Deckard's narration and happy ending included. 

For more information on the different verions click here

See also: 
>Domestic Cut 
>Director's Cut
>Final Cut
 
 
 

 
 
J. R. Isidore 
 
Book/Character 

From the book DADoES, John Isidore is an artificial animal hospital van driver. Isidore is almost constantly called, or referred to as, a chickenhead. 

J. R. Isidore is not un-like J.F. Sebastian from the movie. A very likable character that befriends the androids/Replicants and takes them in his home. 

In the book, it is only a coincidence that Baty and the other androids find him and use his apartment as a hide-out. In the film, J.F. is an employee of the Tyrell Corporation, and Batty uses him to get to the head of the corporation (Tyrell) in a last desparate attempt to expand his expected lifespan. In this way, the J.F. Sebastian character is much better integrated into the story, much more pivotal to its outcome. 

See also: 
Android 
Roy Batty 
Chickehead 
J. F. Sebastian 
Replicant 
Eldon Tyrell


 
Izo
 
Game 

Izo is a shifty character. He owns the Green Pawn pawn shop, in Hawker's Circle. Ray will meet him in Act 2. He may or may not be a Replicant depending on your gameplay. Ray may also visit him in lock-up, and he may be seen in a photograph. 

Timothy Dang does the voice of Izo. 


                                                                





Kaiser
 
Movie/Game/Character 

The Kaiser is a creation of J. F. Sebastians', a "genetic designer" for the Tyrell Corporation, who produces realistic toys. To combat his own loneliness he created automated, humanistic playful 'dolls' that provide him with companionship. J.F. Sebastian is greeted by two of his doll-toys, a miniature, three-foot-high, but long-nosed Kaiser Wilhelm dressed in a military uniform, and a teddy bear dressed like Napoleon. They march up to him after he enters the apartment and say: 
"Home again, home again, jiggety jig" (taken from a Mother Goose rhyme). 

He is also featured in the Westwood game marching about in JF's apartment. 

Role performed by actor John Edward Allen 

See also: 
Bear 
J. F. Sebastian 
Tyrell Corporation



Kingston Kitchens 
 
Game/Location 

Located in Hawker's Circle in Westwood's Blade Runner game. Mama Isabelle runs the take-away delicatessen. Ray McCoy will find a clue that will lead him there (a "Kingston Kitchen Take out box"). You'll want to have Ray stop by a couple times throughout the game. Although she doesn't provide any clues she can identify someone in a photograph and point you to another lead.
 



Kipple
 
Book/Game/Term 


[1] - Kipple, as described in the book (DADoES), are "unwanted or useless objects that tend to reproduce itself". The first law of Kipple is...Kipple drives out nonkipple. Other forms of the word; Kipple-ized, kipple-factor, and kippleization. People can turn into "living kipple". An apartment can become "kipple-infested". Buster Friendly liked to declare, Earth would die under a layer--not of radioactive dust--but of kipple. These and other descriptions in the book suggests an analogy to entropy. 

External References: Wikipedia: Entropy 

[2] - In the Westwood Game, also describes the city outer limits, uninhabitable to ordinary Man.
This term comes up again in other PKD books such as in "Now Wait for Last Year". Here Dr. Eric Sweetscent is also under a pile of kipple, especially in relation to his wife and relationship to his employer. 
Philip K. Dick liked the catchy term so much used it in some of his other books as well.

1.) Kipple is also mentioned in "Galactic Pot-Healer". Joe Fernwright is on the shore of Mare Nostrum, where Glimmung is submerged and possibly dead. Phrases idly run through Joe's head: "Do you like Yeats?" "I don't know, I've never had any." "Do you like Kipling?" "I don't know, I've never kippled." 

2.) And in "A Maze of Death": 
"I'll pile her stuff outside and then get mine aboard. I'm under no mandate to load her kipple".

3.) And again in "Now Wait for Last Year". Here Dr. Eric Sweetscent is also under a pile of kipple, especially in relation to his wife and his employer.



 
Dino Klien
 
Game
 
He runs the lab at police headquarters.
Only found at the LAPD lab, 3rd floor.

Martin Azarow does the voice of Dino.



Leon Kowalski 

Movie/Game 

Movie

  • One four Nexus 6 Replicants reported seen on Earth. We are first introduced to Leon in the opening scene at Tyrell Corportaion being tested on the Voight-Kampf machine by Holden. 

Despite Leons' brevity in the film he had some memorable quotes; 

* "Wake up! Time to die." 

* "Fearful to live in fear, isn't?" 

* "Nothing is worse than having an itch you can never 
scratch." 


Replicant (M) Des: LEON 

NEXUS-6 N6MAC41717 

Incept Date: 10 APRIL, 2017 

Func: Combat/Loader (Nuc. Fiss) 

Phys: LEV. A 
Mental: LEV. C 

performed the role of Leon.


Official Brion James website



Game

  • First encountered in Act 3 in cinematic feature at the Yukon Hotel threatening the hotel clerk. Ray can ask Leon questions. The interaction is more of a nostalgic trip than anything else. 


Brion James reprised his role as Leon for the game. 



                                                                





LAPD Headquarters
 
Movie/Game
 
Movie

  • Location of Bryant's office.  The actual shooting location was the Los
 
Game

  • Location of Bryant's office, the Mainframe, Combat Shooting Course, Lock-up, and the Lab.
 
 

 
 
lead codpiece 

Book 

The remaining male occupants of Earth protect their testicles by wearing a "lead codpiece". However, this is only a temporary measure, they must emigrate to another planet or accept the risk of becoming a "special". 

See also: "AJAX".
 
 

 
 
Howie Lee 
 
Game/Character 

Howie Lee runs the sushi bar in Chinatown in Westwood's Blade Runner game. He is only found there and welcomes Rays patronage. 

The actor who does the voice of Howie Lee is Toru Nagai. He was also the character model for the Howie Lee character.
 



Howie Lee's
 
Game/Location 

Howie Lee's is a sushi bar located in Chinatown in Westwood's Blade Runner game. You are led there by a clue you found at Runciter's (Chopstick wrapper). You can speak with Howie Lee and ask about his chef, Zuben. And you can interview Zuben. You'll also run into a customer of Lee's named Gordo. 

Howie Lee's represents the noodle bar in the movie Blade Runner where we first meet Deckard.



 
Leon
 
Movie
 
See Leon Kowalski 



Taffey Lewis 

Movie 

Taffey Lewis is the owner of "The Snake Pit". 

Famous for his line, "Louie. The man is dry." 

The actor who played the role of Taffy Lewis is Hy Pyke



Taffy Lewis' Bar 

Game 

Nightclub in Nightclub Row owned by Taffy Lewis. The club is suppose to represent "The Snake Pit" from the movie. In the game the marquee simply reading "Taffy Lewis". (Note the spelling of "Taffey" from the movie verses "Taffy" from the game.) 

In Act 3 Ray may encounter Gordo sitting at the bar. You'll recognize him from meeting him at Howie Lee's in Act 1.



Lucy 

Game 

Lucy Devlin is the 14 year-old, pink-haired girl who works at Runciter's. We meet her in the opening cinematic feature. She refers to Clovis as her faher and Dektora her mother. 

Depending on your gameplay Ray may escape with Lucy. She may or may not be a Replicant. 


Pauley Perrette does the voice of Lucy. 




Luft, Luba

Book

Luba Luft ‘posed’ as an opera singer.  She was performing at the "War Memorial Opera House" when both Deckard and Resch went to hunt her down.  Deckard had trouble justifying retiring her. 

Note:  The scene when Deckard first meets and VK's Luba Luft is similar to the Dektora scene at the nightclub in the Westwood game. They called a  "harness bull" to take him away. 



Luther And Lance 

Game 

These two are brothers, Siamese twins. They use to work for the Tyrell Corporation in the Genetic Research lab until Tyrell fired them. They live in an apartment above Dermo Design in DNA Row. 

In Act 4 talk to the Twins about Replicants, work, wifespans, Clovis, Runciter, and Guzza. They will offer you a trade if you retrieve something from Tyrell's for them. 

They may or may not be Replicants, depending on your gameplay. 


Jason Cottle does the voices of Luther and Lance. 

 

                                                                





Mama Isabella
 
Character/Westwood game 

Mama Isabella runs the Kingston Kitchens in Westwood's Blade Runner game. Her stew is her specialty and she prides herself on that fact. She boasts of a secret ingredient. Very outgoing and friendly. You'll want Ray to stop by a few times throughout the game. She may prove useful in identifying someone in a photo or pointing Ray to another lead. 

The actor who does the voice of Mama Isabella is Rosalyn Sidewater.



Ray McCoy 

Game 

The player takes on the role of a rookie cop, Blade Runner Ray McCoy. Armed with a blaster your task is to look for clues and to hunt Replicants. You start with the investigation of an animal murder, and the game quickly introduces you to picking up clues and interviewing people. What you do from here on in basically depends on you! He lives with his dog - Maggie. 

McCoy's name may have been partly inspired by the expression "the real McCoy", especially in relation to the game's question of whether Ray is human or a replicant. 


Mark Benninghoffen does the voice of Ray McCoy.

 


McCoy's Apartment 

Game 

Ray McCoy's apartment located on the 88th floor. The apartment is eerily like Deckard's from the movie, i.e. similar lit advert sign seen through window, similar sofa, the Esper machine, the Frank Lloyd Wright style textured concrete block pattern,and balcony, etc. 


Ray has a dog, Maggie, only seen in his apartment. Remember to feed her and give her love and affection! 

You'll want to have Ray hang-out at the apartment at times. There he can use the Esper machine. Ray may want to watch t.v., check the answering machine, use the lavatory and, of course, sleep..."Portrait of the sleep deprived."



Mercerism

Book

A theological and moral structure. A religion. 

One requires a black empathy box in order for "fusion" with Mercer. By clutching it's handles you are taken into a "virtual reality" world where, as described in book of Isidore's experience: "The visual image congealed; he saw at once a famous landscape, the old, brown, barren ascent, with tufts of dried-out bonelike weeds poking slantedly into a dim and sunless sky. One single figure, more or less human in form, toiled its way up the hillside: an elderly man wearing a dull, featureless robe, covering as meager as if it had been snatched from the hostile emptiness of the sky. The man, Wilbur Mercer, plodded ahead, and, as he clutched the handles, John Isidore gradually experienced a waning of the living room in which he stood; the dilapidated furniture and walls ebbed out and he ceased to experience them at all. He found himself, instead, as always before, entering into the landscape of drab hill, drab sky. And at the same time he no longer witnessed the climb of the elderly man. His own feet now scraped, sought purchase, among the familiar loose stones; he felt the same old painful, irregular roughness beneath his feet and once again smelled the acrid haze of the sky -not Earth's sky but that of some place alien, distant, and yet, by means of the empathy box, instantly available." 

More on Mercer from book: "Rule of life laid down by Mercer. You shall kill only the killers, Mercer had told them the year empathy boxes first appeared on Earth. And in Mercerism, as it evolved into a full theology, the concept of The Killers had grown insidiously. In Mercerism, an absolute evil plucked at the threadbare cloak of the tottering, ascending old man, but it was never clear who or what this evil presence was. A Mercerite sensed evil without understanding it. Put another way, a Mercerite was 
free to locate the nebulous presence of The Killers wherever he saw fit." 

An excellent essay on this can be found at Androids Essay and Analysis Critique.
 
Here is a little from that blog; "The religion allows humans to connect with each other in order to ease the haunting burdens of loneliness and despair. “You have to be with other people…[i]n order to live at all” (204). This connection is maintained by the use of the infamous empathy box, as character in the novel explains, “…it’s the way you touch other humans, it’s the way you stop being alone” (66). It encourages the joining of humans to share their experiences, happiness, and grief, the goal being the “fusion of their mentalities orient[ing] their attention on…the need to ascend…[s]tep by step…” (22,173). By having a common belief and contributing to the mutual effort of climbing the eternal hill, life regains meaning and hope is forged to lift up humanity. Breaking through the shackles that bind them and slowly ascending to a better place, the united human race can once again thrive. This religion provides a means by which the isolated populations can interact and promotes needed unification. Mercerism and its eternal spokesman, Wilbur Mercer, inspire hope by allowing the humans to rely on each other."



 

Methuselah Syndrome  
 
Movie/Term 

Definition: 
Human genetic disorder leading to an accelerated aging process as described by J.F. Sebastian who suffers from it. 

Movie Dialogue: 
Pris: "How old are you?" 
JF: "Twenty-five." 
Pris: "What's your problem?" 
JF: "Methuselah Syndrome." 
Pris: "What's that?" 
JF: "My glands, they grow old too fast." 

Humans with genetic disorders are not allowed to go Off-World. 

Speculation: 
Did Tyrell somehow alter JF's DNA to keep him on Earth? 
Did Tyrell use JF's DNA to create a limited life-span for the Nexus-6 Replicants? 

See: Accelerated Decrepitude.




Moraji 

Game 

Moraji is a genetic engineer who builds skin for Repliants for the Tyrell Corporation. He works at Dermo Design at DNA Row. Ray will encounter Moraji under dire circumsctances. Attempt to save him and comfort the dying Moraji and he will tell you a couple things. 


Iqbal Theba does the voice of Moraji. 

 






Nexus 6
 
Book/Movie/Game 

The NEXUS 6 Replicants are a model manufactured by the Tyrell Corporation. They are nearly indistinguishable from humans. The major factor differentiating a Nexus 6 from humans is their lack of empathy. 

As presented in the opening of the movie Blade Runner: 

LOS ANGELES,NOVEMBER, 2019 

Early in the 21st Century, THE TYRELL 
CORPORATION advanced Robot evolution 
into the NEXUS phase -- a being virtually 
identical to a human -- known as a replicant. 
The NEXUS 6 Replicants were superior 
in strength and agility, and at least equal 
in intelligence, to the genetic engineers 
who created them. 
Replicants were used Off-world as 
slave labor, in the hazardous exploration and 
colonization of other planets. 
After a bloody mutiny by a NEXUS 6 
combat team in an Off-world colony, 
Replicants were declared illegal 
on earth -- under penalty of death. 
Special police squads -- BLADE RUNNER 
UNITS -- had orders to shoot to kill, upon 
detection, any trespassing Replicants. 

This was not called execution. 
It was called retirement. 


In Blade Runner the Replicants' eyes glow (even those of an artificial owl). This is a cinematic technique used by Ridley Scott only seen by the audience. 

The engineers noticed that Replicants had started to develop their own emotional responses to various stimuli. As a result, the Nexus 6 Replicants have a fail-safe mechanism, namely a four year lifespan. In the book, DADoES, the androids live a maximum of roughly four years because their cells cannot be replaced as they deteriorate. 

In DADoES the Nexus-6 androids are verified with a bone marrow test. Also, the androids tend to "give up" when confronted by the inevitable, the film versions are much more retaliatory.

 
 

 
 
Nightclub Row
 
Game/Location 

In the Westwood game, Nightclub Row is where Early Q and Taffy Lewis' bar is located.
 



Noodle Bar 

Movie/Game 


Movie
 
  • Formally known as the White Dragon Noodle Bar, it is located in the heart of LA's China Town and offers the finest in fast, affordable, and delicious contemporary Asian food. This is the setting where we first meet Deckard. 


Excerpt from: Blade Runner Souvenir Magazine - Official Collector's Edition 

"The idea for this noodle bar, where we first see Deckard, was like a McDonalds of the future in a way. The way I translated it, I thought of it as like a place called White Castle I used to go to as a kid. White Castles were originally built in the 1940's. All the surfaces were all curved and tiled. Based on that, but making it an outdoor place, we made our noodle bar. We took the attitude that it's a chain. There's one downtown when we first see Deckard and there's another one when Sebastian drives up to his apartment." 
- LAWRENCE G. PAULL 


Game

  • In the game the Noodle Bar is referred to as "Howie Lee's" and is a sushi bar located in Chinatown. 


See: Howie Lee's 
 
 






Off-world

Movie/Westwood Game/Book 

Space colonization outside planet Earth. 

In the movie the Blimp floats over the city constantly advertising the benefits of Off-world colonization, stating: 

"A new life awaits you in the Off-world colonies. The chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure. New climate, recreational facilities.....absolutely free. Use your new friend as a personal body servant or a tireless field hand--the custom tailored genetically engineered humanoid replicant designed especially for your needs. So come on America, let's put our team up there...." Added for BRDC: "This annoucement is brought to you by the Shimato Dominguez Corporation - helping America into the New World." 

"...the Earth has become so polluted and congested, that the populace are 
encouraged to migrate to "off world colonies". The reasons for this pollution are not really explained in the film, but in the novel the radioactive dust and pollution was caused by "World War Terminus", also referred to as "W.W.T.". " 
(excerpt from Do Androids Dream of Blade Running? by Mark Casey) 

In order to migrate to the "Off-world colonies" one must pass the minimum mental faculties test, and physical. 

In DADoES, it is referred to as the"colony world" and it is insinuated that there are three planets that make up this colonization. However, only Mars is mentioned. New America is a U.S. settlement on Mars.


 
Origami
 
Movie/Game
 
This is open to debate.  Some interpretations and speculations follow below:

Chicken- 1.) Insinuating that Deckard lacks courage to accept the job, willingly.
2.) It could be viewed as an unconsious motivator for Deckard to take the job. 
3.) Or, that Gaff would be the better choice for the job.

Stick Man- 1.) Suggesting Deckard may let his feelings for Rachael get in the way of the investigation.
2.) A "sign" that Gaff knew Leon was in hiding in the bathroom.  Rationale behind this, as seen in the "Final Cut":   You first see Gaff enter the bathroom. He looks around. Then he appears to use the toilet (urinate). He notices a scrap of paper on the sink which he then transforms throughout the scene into the Stickman. When Gaff places it on the table top Deckard doesn't appear to actually "see" it. But...after they leave the room, Leon comes out of the bathroom. He sees the Stickman. It was meant for him. Gaff, apparently, knew Leon was there...but let him go. This also makes sense in context with the unicorn Gaff leaves Deckard/Rachel at the end of the movie. He knows that, either Rachel is there under Deckard's protection OR that Deckard is a Replicant, and let's them go.  

Unicorn - Refer here.
 
 
The Number 3 and Three Origami Creations. 
 
 
Along with the Christain themes throughout Blade Runner, three represents The Holy Trinity in Christian doctrine (or trinity in general), is God both a single entity and three entities, the Father, the Son and the Spirit. 

Bad luck is often said to "come in threes".

The phrase "Third time's a charm" usually means the third time a person attempts something, they will succeed.

Fairy Tales have a prominent pattern in the number Three (i.e. 3 bears, 3 pigs, 3 Billy goats gruff, 3 notes to the Pied Piper, 3 kittens, Cinderella and her 2 sisters, 3 wishes, 3 characters, 3 tasks to be performed, travel to the third bend in the road, 3 blind mice, etc.).
 
William Shakespeare's, Macbeth, the number three emerges most frequently, (The Three Witches, Macbeth approaches the witches and asks three questions, The witches tell Macbeth three predictions, etc.).  The three Norns (Urd {That which has become}, Verdandi {That which is becoming} and Skuld {That which shall come} ).
 
In the Westwood game, depending on your gameplay, Ray may encounter an origami. 
 
Also see: Gaff








Penfield mood organ 

Book
 
Commonly referred to as a "Penfield". 

An artificial brain stimulator. It is a device that one "dials". It has many settings. There is a "schedule" that is preset by the individual for being in the ideal mood for whatever the occasion calls for. 

Some examples mentioned in book are: 
C=Brighten into optimism 
A481=VERY optimistic 
888=The desire to watch tv, no matter what's on it. 
3=creates the desire to "dial". 
I04=ecstatic sexual bliss 
594=Pleased acknowledgment of husband's superior wisdom in all matters. 

Excerpt from book: "At his console he hesitated between dialing for a thalamic suppressant (which would abolish his mood of rage) or a thalamic stimulant (which would make him irked enough to win the argument)." 

Deckard's wife, Iran, discovered a setting to bring-about depression (382=comotose). 

The Penfield can also be used as a non-lethal weapon. In Deckard's weapons kit he has a nondirectional Penfield wave transmitter which he can select "catalepsy", as he did in one case, which renders both humans and androids helpless. 

It is also associated with an intruder alarm which Roy Baty put together during their stay in Isidore's building. As Roy descrided in Chapter 14: "When the alarm has been triggered it radiates a mood of panic to the - intruder. Unless he acts very fast, which he may. Enormous panic; I have the gain turned all the way up. No human being can remain in the vicinity more than a matter of seconds."

 
FYI
The name Penfield was probably inspired by the real life surgeon, Wilder Penfield.  Penfield was a groundbreaking researcher and highly original surgeon. 
In the 1950s, Penfield was trying to treat patients with intractable epilepsy. Before an epileptic seizure, he knew, patients experience an "aura," a warning that the seizure is about to occur. Penfield thought if he could provoke this aura with a mild electric current on the brain, then he would have located the source of the seizure activity and could remove or destroy that bit of tissue. While patients were fully conscious, though anaesthetized, he opened their skulls and tried to pinpoint the source of their epilepsy.

His technique was often successful, but his experimental surgery led him to an even more dramatic discovery. Stimulation anywhere on the cerebral cortex could bring responses of one kind or another, but he found that only by stimulating the temporal lobes (the lower parts of the brain on each side) could he elicit meaningful, integrated responses such as memory, including sound, movement, and color. These memories were much more distinct than usual memory, and were often about things unremembered under ordinary circumstances. Yet if Penfield stimulated the same area again, the exact same memory popped up -- a certain song, the view from a childhood window -- each time. It seemed he had found a physical basis for memory, an "engram." 1

 

More about Wilder Penfield:


Wilder Penfield, from Wikipedia



 

Pris 

Book/Movie 

Book

  • We are first introduced to Pris Stratton in chapter six. She moved into the same apartment building as Isidore, thinking it was completely vacant. Although Isidore is attracted and cares for Pris, she is outright mean to him. 

Pris Stratton is described as looking exactly the same as Rachel Rosen. 


Movie

  • Pris is one of the renegade Replicants who escaped Off-World. She is the "pleasure model", created for entertainment. "The standard item for military clubs in the outer colonies." Pris has an incept date of February 14 - St. Valentine's Day. 

Pris is the girlfriend of fellow Replicant, Roy Batty. 

Our first glimpse of Pris is seeing her walking the kipple-filled streets on her way to the Bradbury. She befriends "JF" in order for Roy to meet with Eldon Tyrell. 


Replicant (F) Des: PRIS 

NEXUS-6 N6FAB21416 

Incept Date: 14 FEB., 2016 

Func: Military/Leisure 

Phys: LEV. A 
Mental: LEV. B 


FYI

  • In PKD's novel "We Can Build You" the character Pris Rock is identical to Blade Runner's Pris. She is described as having blonde hair, with a little sharp face and dark eyes. She also is described as wearing "racoon-like" makeup, with black around the eyes, at one point. "We Can Build You" is set in the same universe as Blade Runner, only twenty years earlier. 


Role performed by Daryl Hannah 







Rachael 

Book/Movie/Game
 
Book

  • Rachael Rosen is the 18 year old niece of Eldon Rosen, of Rosen Association. She is described as having a heavy mass of dark hair, and "...because of her diminutive breasts her body assumed a lank, almost childlike stance. But her great eyes, with their elaborate lashes, could only be those of a grown woman; there the resemblance to adolescence ended...Rachael had been modeled on the Celtic type of build, anachronistic and attractive." 1 

As in the movie, Rachael is selected to test the Voigt-Kampff scale which reveals she is an android. Deckard is attracted to her. But that is as far as the similarities go between the Rachael Rosen of the book and the Rachael Tyrell in the movie. 

Rachael Rosen persuaded Deckard to have sex, only later to reveal that she had done the same with nine other bounty hunters in order to stop them from bounty hunting. Deckard threatened to retire her but then opted to let her live, rationalizing that she only has two years of life remaining. 

Movie

  • When we first meet Rachel, she appears to be a fairly high-ranking member of the Tyrell Corporation staff; Tyrell's personal assistant. She also appears very human. However, it soon becomes clear that she is not what she appears, or even what she believes herself to be. She has implanted memories of Tyrell's niece and is led to believe that she is human. 

When Deckard is sent to Tyrell's to try out the Voigt-Kampff test on the new Nexus-6 models, Eldon Tyrell submitted Rachael to try it. 

The news that she is actually a replicant has a very bad effect on her. However, Deckard takes an interest in her, and feels sorry for her after she finds out that her memories are false. It soon becomes clear that Rachel actually has an emotional connection with him too since he took her in when she had nowhere else to go. 


Game

  • The character of Rachael Tyrell is reprised in the Westwood's Blade Runner game. 


acted in both the role and voice of Rachel Tyrell in the movie and game. Official website.


1. DADoES, by P.K. Dick, Chapter sixteen, page 164


 
 
Replicant 

Movie/Game 


"A genetically engineered creature composed entirely of organic substance. Animal replicants (animoids) were developed first for use as pets and beasts of burden after most real animals became extinct. Later, humanoid replicants were created for military purposes and for the exploration and colonization of space. The Tyrell Corp. recently introduced the Nexus 6, the supreme replicant -- much stronger and faster than, and virtually indistinguishable from, real human beings. Earth law forbids replicants on the planet, except in the huge industrial complex where they are created. The law does not consider replicants human and therefore accords them no rights nor protection." 
-Taken from the 1982 Presskit Defintion of a Replicant 


"LOS ANGELES,NOVEMBER, 2019 

Early in the 21st Century, THE TYRELL 
CORPORATION advanced Robot evolution 
into the NEXUS phase -- a being virtually 
identical to a human -- known as a replicant. 
The NEXUS 6 Replicants were superior 
in strength and agility, and at least equal 
in intelligence, to the genetic engineers 
who created them. 
Replicants were used Off-world as 
slave labor, in the hazardous exploration and 
colonization of other planets. 
After a bloody mutiny by a NEXUS 6 
combat team in an Off-world colony, 
Replicants were declared illegal 
on earth -- under penalty of death. 
Special police squads -- BLADE RUNNER 
UNITS -- had orders to shoot to kill, upon 
detection, any trespassing Replicants. 

This was not called execution. 
It was called retirement." 
-As presented in the opening of the movie Blade Runner 


The major factor differentiating a Nexus 6 from humans is their lack of empathy. As a result, a Replicant can only be detected by its lack of emotional responses and empathy to questions posed in the Voight-Kampff test. 


A derogatory term for Replicant is "skin-job."


FYI
The term replicant in the film Blade Runner got its name from screenwriter David Peoples' daughter, who suggested the term "replicating." 





Resch, Phil 

Book 

Phil Resch is a bounty hunter in the book DADoES. He is introduced to Deckard in Chapter Ten, when Deckard is brought to the 'andy' Hall of Justice on Mission Street by a "harness bull". Resch hadn't realized it, but he had been working with androids for three years. Resch is not an android. 

He is described as being a tall, fleshless man with hard-etched features, wearing horn-rim glasses and a fuzzy Vandyke beard. 

Resch and Deckard debate amongst one another over whether they are androids are not. They both have tests they give to one another. Deckard uses the Voigt-Kampff test, whilst Resch uses his Boneli Reflex-Arc Test. 

Resch and Deckard hunt down Luba Luft together. Deckard comes to the conclusion that Resch is a good bounty hunter. Deckard starts to doubt his own abilities. They part ways after Resch retired Luba Luft.

 

 
Retirement 

Book/Movie/Game
 
Meaning to terminate or exterminate a "replicant". 

As stated at the beginning of Blade Runner: "BLADE RUNNER UNITS -- had orders to shoot to kill, upon detection, any trespassing Replicants. This was not called execution. It was called retirement."

 
 

 
Runciter 

Game 

Merchant of Runciter's Animals. The opening of the game starts at Runciter's Animals with a cinematic feature setting the tone, "30 counts of animal murder and one count of aggravated assault." Ray McCoy is called to the crime scene and has the opportuninty to find clues and interview Runciter. 

Lucy Devlin was employed at Runciter's. 

Runciter is seen only at Runciter's Animals. 


FYI
The name Runciter was a character from the PKD book "UBIK", Glen Runciter (However the charaters do not share similar traits nor profession.). 




Warren Burton does the voice of Runciter. 









Sadik 

Game 

He's the guy with dreadlocks and an attitude. His weapon of choice are explosives. He is friends with Clovis. Ray first encounters Sadik in Act 2. 

Depending on your gameplay Sadik may be either a Replicant or human. 


Alexander Mervin does the voice of Sadik. 



 
Salander 3
 
Book
 
Eldon Rosen claimed that Rachael was born and spent the first fourteen of her 18 years living aboard the Salander 3.  The ship was bound for Proxima with a crew of nine adults.  The ship returned to Earth a sixth of the way there.
 
Salander 3 was also used in K.W. Jeter's Blade Runner sequel books, "Blade Runner 2: The Edge of Human" and "Blade Runner 3: Replicant Night".
 


J F Sebastian 
 
Movie/Game/Character 

J. F. Sebastian is a genetic designer for the Tyrell Corporation. He lives in the Bradbury Hotel. He has remained on Earth due to a condition fictionally called "methuselah syndrome" (a case of progeria). 

In his spare time he "makes friends", android companions. The two featured creations are Napoleon Bear and the Kaiser. Chess is his other known interest. 

J. F. Sebastian is not un-like J.R. Isidore from the book DADoES. Very likable characters that befriend the andoids/Replicants and take them into his home. 

The actor playing the role of J. S. Sebastian is William Sanderson. 

Mr. Sanderson reprises this role for the Westwood game. 


See:
Accelerated Decrepitude 
Bear 
DADoES 
J. R. Isidore 
Methuselah Syndrome 
Kaiser 


 
Snake Pit, The 

Movie 

The Snake Pit is Taffey Lewis' nightclub in the 1st Sector of Chinatown. Deckard stops by their based on a lead. There he is in search of Zhora Salome, a Replicant working as an exotic dancer at the club. 

The club is inspired by the Wiltern Art Deco design. 

In the game it is referred to as Taffy Lewis' bar, with the marquee simply reading "Taffy Lewis". (Note the spelling of "Taffey" from the movie verses "Taffy" from the game.)



Specials

Book/Game

"Specials", as opposed to "regulars", are those who fail to pass the minimum mental faculties test in order to emigrate OffWorld. 

Excerpt from book: "Once pegged as special, a citizen, even if accepting sterilization, dropped out of history. He ceased, in effect, to be part of mankind." 

The cause of this deterioration is the radioactive dust in the air left over from "World War Terminus". Although the dust is weaker at the point in time of the story (those who survived had become somewhat immune) it still can cause deranged minds and modify genetic properties. It can be monitored by medical checkups and psychiatric tests. The only prevention for this is to emigrate. Protection used while on Earth is a lead codpiece (refer to AJAX), for men. 

A "nice" way of referring to a person with a deficient intelligence. See also "Chickenhead".




Spinner

Movie/Game

The Spinner is vehicle that can both fly and can drive as a ground car.  It takes-off vertically, hover and cruise using jet propulsion.  It was designed by Syd Mead. Mead has described the spinner as an aerodyne – a vehicle which directs air downward to create lift, though press kit for the film stated that the spinner was propelled by three engines: "conventional internal combustion, jet and anti-gravity".


BladeZone interview with Gene Winfield, builder of the full-sized spinners.
BRmovie.com – Spinner collectibles

(Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

The Spinner - from BladeZone.



Crystal Steele

Game/Character 

Character in the Westwood Blade Runner computer game. License number BR6134. She is a Rep Detect who ultimately sticks to the departments' attitude towards replicants, cold-blooded and ruthless. She works alone, and is adamant about that. 

Ray McCoy encounters her in the beginning of the game. Crystal's nickname for Ray is "Slim". Their cases overlap one another which may either help or hinder Ray. Depending on your gameplay you may either remain indifferent to her, earn her respect, be killed by her, or walk off together into the slum-set. 

The actor who does the voice of Crystal Steele is Lisa Edelstein

BladeZone features an exclusive interview with Lisa Edelstein.



Synthetic Freedom Fighter 

Book

As described in the book: "Humanoid robot - strictly speaking, the organic android - had become the mobile donkey engine of the colonization program. Under U.N. law each emigrant automatically received possession of an android subtype of his choice... 
That had been the ultimate incentive of emigration: the android servant as carrot, the radioactive fallout as stick. The U.N. had made it easy to emigrate, difficult if not impossible to stay."


 







Tanhauser gate 

Movie 

Line from movie spoken by Roy Batty: 

"I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near Tanhauser Gate. All those moments will be lost ... in time, like tears in rain. Time ... to die." 

From Wikipedia: The Tannhauser Gate is a location referred to in dialogue in the 1982 film Blade Runner. Roy Batty, played by Rutger Hauer, refers to it while recounting his experiences as a soldier. Given the fact that Earth has offworld colonies in Blade Runner, and the typical functions of devices incorporating the word "gate" in science fiction, it is reasonable to assume that the Tannhauser Gate is a stargate-type construct providing faster-than-light travel between star systems, perhaps located near or in orbit of a colony named Tannhauser. 

Term also used in the movie 'Soldier' with Kurt Russel (script by David Peoples), mentioned in the Anime 'Gunbuster', and the computer games Homeworld, and Heavy Gear 2. 

Tannhauser Gate was also a game developer. 

Traditionally found in Wagner's 'Tannhäuser', based on a German legend, an opera about the Knight Tannhäuser, who is in lust with the goddess Venus, and in Love with the human Elizabeth. He lives deep in the mountain of Venusberg, but is magically sent back to the earth's surface through a portal when he wishes to be reunited with Elizabeth. 

In Robert A. Heinlein's book 'Podkayne of Mars' (1962), he had the "Hilton Tannhäuser"as a one line throw away for the name of a Hotel in the town of Venusburg, Venus.

 

 
 
Tsing Tao 

Movie 

This is a brand of vodka that Deckard drinks. 

We are first introduced to this mythical drink after Deckard kills Zhora. He buys a bottle of Tsing Tao. 

Afterwards, Deckard brings Rachael back to his apartment. He suffers from the "shakes", and drinks a shot glass of Tsing-Tao. Blood flows from his wounded lip, mixing swirling red blood into his shot glass of vodka. 


FYI: 
In the shooting draft of the screenplay, after deckard reveals to Rachael the memory implants he offers her a drink. He goes into the kitchen to clean a glass. 
"Deckard opens the refrigerator. The contents aren't 
messy so much as unusual. He opens the freezer com- 
partment and pulls out a bottle of Tsing Tao vodka 
and eyes it. Half-empty." 1 





1 Screenplay by HAMPTON FANCHER and DAVID PEOPLES February 23, 1981

 

 
Dr. Eldon Tyrell 
 
Movie/Game/Character 


Book
 
  • In the book, DADoES, the character is Eldon Rosen. He is the CEO of Rosen Association, located in Seattle, Washington. Rosen is the source and center from which power emanates. 

Movie
 
  • Dr. Eldon Tyrell is CEO of Tyrell Corporation. the makers of the Nexus series Replicant. He is presented as a kind of deity figure in the movie, a major component to one of the underlying themes found in the movie. 

Game
 
  • Tyrell is only found at the Tyrell Corporation. You can only talk to him during Act 2. 


Joe Turkel performs the role of Eldon Tyrell in the movie and does the voice in the Westwood game. 

See also: 
DADoES 
Tyrell Corporation 
Westwood game 


 
Tyrell Corporation 

Movie/Game 


The top Replicant manufacturer based in Los Angeles. The Tyrell Corporation is named after its founder Dr. Eldon Tyrell. Their motto is "More human than human". The headquarters are constructed of Mayan-inspired pyramids. 

Their most recent Nexus 6 model are nearly indistinguishable from humans. 


Speculation: 
There has been debate over how powerful (possibly corrupt) a company the Tyrell Corporation is. The Tyrell Corporation represents the attempt to control through vision, using a theme consistent throughout the film, namely "eye symbolism". They not only implant Replicants with memories, but as part of the information and media industry they create a sense of reality.







Unicorn 

Movie/Game 

Movie

  • A. The daydream sequence Deckard has as he is sitting at the piano is of a unicorn galloping in slow motion. The scene is only in the Director's Cut and The Final Cut.  

B. The unicorn is the last of three origami figures that Gaff crafted throughout the movie. It appears at the end of the film when Deckard leaves his apartment with Rachael. She knocks over an origami unicorn as she walks towards the elevator. Deckard sees it in the corner of his eye, and picks it up nodding his head. 

One interpretation is that the unicorn was simply a message to Deckard to say he knows he's with Rachael and will let her live. Another interpretation is that the unicorn is Gaff's challenge to hunt them both down. 


An interesting article regarding this theme can be found here.

FYI:
  • Sebastian's apartment is full of bastardized creatures, part man, part machine, and part animal. There is a stuffed unicorn on Sebastian's work table (screen right, as the mice scurry over scattered paraphernalia while Sebastian sleeps).

Speculative question: 
  • When Deckard dreams of the unicorn it should be a private dream, yet Gaff, by leaving an origami unicorn on the landing hints that he knows about the dream. How could this be unless Gaff has seen the data implanted in Deckard's mind? 

Game

  • Gaff leaves his infamous calling card for Ray in the game. Depending on your gameplay, Ray will either find the origami on the Moonbus floor, or on the ground outside the Moonbus.







Vangelis 


Vangelis is a famous Greek composer and keyboardist. He composes and performs mainly instrumental music and film scores. During his career he has flirted with many genres and has proved to be very hard to categorize. His music has been filed as "synthesizer music", "new age", "progressive rock", "Symphonic rock", "Space music", "electronic music", etc. etc. None of those terms is spot on and his output is too varied to catch in one word. 
He was born as "Evanghelos Odyssey Papathanassiou" on march 29th 1943 in a small town near Volos, Greece. He started playing the piano at the age of 4 and gave his first public performance of his own compositions at the age of 6. 

Most legendary soundtracks are perhaps the Oscar winning score to "Chariots of Fire" and the ever popular score to Ridley Scott's landmark cult film "Blade Runner". 

Source: 
ELSEWHERE -- Independent VANGELIS Web-site


 

Vid-phōn 

Book/Movie/Game 

The primary method of communication allowing people to communicate audibly and visually with one another.


Book

  • Referred to as a "vidphone", it is used throughout the book.



Movie

  • Referred to as a "vid-phōn". 
Examples when used: 
• Roy Batty is introduced exiting a vid-phōn booth. 
• Rachael appears on the telephone vid-screen when Deckard calls her from "The Snake Pit". 
• Deckard uses one from his spinner receiving an update from Captain Bryant and to call J.F. Sebastian. 

Game

  • It is specified as a Zenith Vidphone in the game. You frequently want to check the vidphone in Ray's apartment. There is also one at Taffy's bar and in Luther and Lance's place above Moraji's Dermo Design.



Voigt-Kampff 

General/Concept/Equipment 

Description - Voigt-Kampff refers to the Voigt-Kampff test as well as the Voigt-Kampff machine. The Voigt-Kampff test is the empathy test used to determine if a person is a human or a replicant. The Voigt-Kampff machine is a briefcase-sized device, that measures involuntary contractions of the iris muscle, capilary dilation of the human skin blush response, and the presence of airborne particles emitted from the body (presumably sweat, pheromones, etc.). The Voigt-Kampff machine is used primarily by blade runners to determine if a suspect is human by measuring the degree of his empathic response through carefully worded questions.  

According to DADoES, the name Voigt-Kampff refers to the two Leningrad scientists specializing in android science and psychology, Dr. Voigt and Dr. Lurie Kampff, who invented and enhanced the reaction scales. 

Rick Deckard with the Voight-Kampff machine


Book

  • "I'm not a peace officer," Rick said. "I'm a bounty hunter." From his opened briefcase he fished out the Voight-Kampff apparatus, seated himself at a nearby rosewood coffee table, and began to assemble the rather simple polygraphic instruments..."This" - he held up the flat adhesive disk with its trailing wires - "measures capillary dilation in the facial area. We know this to be a primary autonomic response... This records fluctuations of tension within the eye muscles."

Movie

  • Two replicants are given the test; Leon and Rachael. 
  • Deckard tells Tyrell that it usually takes 20 to 30 cross-referenced questions to distinguish a replicant. With Rachael it took more than a hundred. 
  • Description from the original 1982 Blade Runner press-kit:
A very advanced form of lie detector that measures contractions of the iris muscle and the presence of invisible airborne particles emitted from the body. The bellows were designed for the latter function and give the machine the menacing air of a sinister insect. The VK is used primarily by Blade Runners to determine if a suspect is truly human by measuring the degree of his empathic response through carefully worded questions and statements.


Slang: V-K is Slang for the Voigt-Kampff test, or for conducting such a test. 


Dialog #1 (Holden and Deckard from an early script) 
Quote:

DECKARD 
You Voight-Kampff him ? 
(Holden's eyes flutter a moment. Deckard waits. The breathing changes rhythm.) 
HOLDEN 
Yeah! I thought maybe I was getting something...... 
Maybe it doesn't work on these ones Deck.


Dialog #2 (Deckard and Bryant from the film) 
Quote:
BRYANT: Now there's a Nexus 6 over at the Tyrell Corporation. I want you to go put the machine on it. 
DECKARD: And if the machine doesn't work?

Note:  In DADoES it is spelled "Voigt-Kampff", however in the film subtitles, and in the movie scripts it is spelled "Voight-Kampf".

Additional Notes:  From the "Final Cut" release of Blade Runner, there came extra footage to marvel over. Among them were additional narration. It included the following, pertaining to the Voight-Kampff test. Among the titled "series" of questions named were:

Omega Series

Coleman Series

Cummings' Cross-reference

 

See:  Empathy Test

 






Amanda Werner 

Book

A perpetual guest on Buster Friendly and His Friendly friends show. She's described as being beautiful, elegant and conically breasted. Taken from the book; "Women like Amanda Werner never made movies, never appeared in plays; they lived out their queer, beautiful lives as guests on Buster's unending show... Amanda's hair glowed, eyes glinted, her teeth shone; she never ran down, never became tired, never found herself at a loss as to a clever retort to Buster's bang-bang string of quips, jokes, and sharp observations."



Westwood game 

Referring to the Westwood Studios' Blade Runner game. 

Westwood Studios was a computer and video games developer, founded in 1985 as Westwood Associates by Brett Sperry and Louis Castle and based in Las Vegas, Nevada. In 1992, the company was renamed Westwood Studios and sold to Virgin Interactive. 

Westwood's greatest commercial success came in 1995, with the release of real-time strategy game Command & Conquer. 

In 1998, Westwood was acquired by Electronic Arts (EA). In March of 2003, Westwood Studios was closed by EA. 

Their top games include: 
*Blade Runner (1997) 
*Lands of Lore: The Throne of Chaos (1993) 
*Eye of the Beholder (1990) 
*World Games (1986) 
*Command & Conquer: Red Alert 2 (2000) 
*Nox (2000) 
*Legend of Kyrandia: Hand of Fate, The (1993) 
*Eye of the Beholder II: The Legend of Darkmoon (1991) 
*Legend of Kyrandia: Malcolm's Revenge, The (1994) 
*Emperor: Battle for Dune (2001)

 
 

 
 
World War Terminus
 
Book/Concept 

In the pre-history of DADoES World War Terminus left the earth devastated and nearly uninhabitable with radioactivity. Whoever could afford it (and pass the minimum mental faculties test) migrated to Mars. It was a gradual decay. 

Excerpts from the book: 

"The legacy of World War Terminus had diminished in potency; those who could not survive the dust had passed into oblivion years ago, and the dust, weaker now and confronting the strong survivors, only deranged minds and genetic properties." 

"...owls had fallen from the sky...species after species had become extinct...read in the animal obits... fox one morning, badgers the next." 

"...ads {would read} 'Emigrate or degenerate! The choice is yours!' " 

This event is the backdrop for the book and heavily influenced, and carried over, to the movie. 

See also: 
Ajax 
Chickenhead 
Lead Codpiece 
Off-World 
Off-World Colonization 
Specials


 
Workprint 

Shown the night of March 5, 1982 at the Continental Theater in Denver & also shown the following evening, March 6, at the Northpark Cinema in Dallas. Resurfaced in 1990 at the Fairfax Theater in Los Angeles, during a spring classic film festival. It was also shown in 1991 at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences theater, at an event called the UCLA Los Angeles Perspectives Film Festival, plus shown at the NuArt in L.A. and the Castro Theater in San Francisco that same year. 

For more information on the different verions click here


See also: 

>Director's Cut 
>International Cut 
>Domestic Cut
>Final Cut







Yukon Hotel 

Movie/Game Location 

Movie
 
  • This is the hotel Leon is staying at. It is on "1187 Hunterwasser" Street. Deckard traced the hotel address from Holden's VK on Leon at the Tyrell Corporation. 

The Yukon Hotel was filmed at the Pan-Am building, South Broadway (opposite the Bradbury Building). 


Game
 
  • In Act 3, Ray wakes tied to a chair in a room at the Yukon Hotel. Free Ray from the entanglement, investigate the room, then check out the lobby. There Ray will meet Leon and the Yukon Hotel clerk.

 

 
Yukon Hotel Desk Clerk 

Game 

He is first seen in Act 3, being threatened by Leon. Other than that, his role in the game is not significant. 


Richard Kimmel does the voice of the Desk Clerk.








Zhora 

Movie
 
Zhora, as introduced to us by "The Snake Pit" club announcer: 
"Ladies and Gentleman, Taffey Lewis presents Miss Salome and the snake. Watch her take the pleasure from the serpent that once corrupted man." 

Zhora Salome is one of the renegade Replicants who escaped Off-World. She has a snake tatoo on the side of her face, down her neck. She was trained for an Off-world kick-murder squad. As Bryant described her, "Talk about beauty and the beast, she's both." 

She is shot to her death in a dramatic display of 'windowpane crashing' turbulence by Deckard amongst shop window mannequins. 


Gender Female 
Designation Zhora 
Model NEXUS-6 N6FAB61216 
Incept date June 12, 2016 
Function Retrained (9 Feb., 2018) Polit. homicide 
Physical level A 
Mental level B 


The role of Zhora is played by Joanna Cassidy 
 


Zuben 

Game

Zuben is the new chef at Howie Lee's. Ray will have the opportunity to meet Zuben in Act 1. 

Zuben can be found at Howie Lee's, in the alley, then the warehouse. Depending on your gameplay he may also be found on the rooftop of Ray's apartment building. 

Gerald Okamura does the voice of Zuben.