Artwork

A Promise and a Challenge is available as an image download. This is an original, hand-drawn charcoal rendering. The Old World Swallowtail, or Common Yellow Swallowtail, is a beautiful yellow butterfly with black markings. In addition to the yellow, its lower wings feature a few splashes of blue and a red eye spot at the base. The pencil and charcoal rendering depicts the imago—the adult stage—just hours after emerging from its pupa, the last evidence of its former life. The butterfly is perched in the sun a few hours after emerging, waiting for its new wings to fully dry. The transformation from caterpillar to butterfly is a beautiful metaphor of the Christian life—the transformation from our old life of sin to our new life in Christ; God’s promise to all who trust in His name (2 Corinthians 5:17). The same metaphor is also a perfect reminder of God’s challenge to turn from our old life and become, with His guidance, what He wants us to be and do for His glory (Romans 12:2).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Salt and Light
is available as an image download. This is an original, hand-drawn charcoal rendering. In the Jordan Rift Valley, with Israel to the west and Judea and Samaria to the east, lies the Dead Sea, one of the world's saltiest bodies of water. At 33.7 percent salinity, the Dead Sea is 8.6 times saltier than the world's oceans. From the deep blue sky overhead, the constant sun beats down on the lapping water and its surreal white shoreline. The rocks are thickly encrusted with many layers of salt and minerals, glittering snow-like in the sun. In all directions you can observe two qualities of which this unique area has in seemingly endless quantities--salt and light. Two qualities of which we should also possess in equally great amounts (Matthew 5:13-16). The charcoal rendering depicts an imagined ground-level view of one of these low, glittering, salt-encrusted shoreline rocks, with the sun shining high above. It is a unique visual reminder that in a dark, and flavorless world, we are to be salt and we are to be light.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Joy is available as an image download. This is an original, hand-drawn charcoal rendering. The candle radiating its light into the darkness is a wonderful metaphore of the joy we are to radiate in our lives.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Lion and the Lamb
is available as an image download. This is an original, rough charcoal rendering that depicts a lion and a lamb. For nearly three thousand years this imagery has suggested to all a time of peace and harmony, when the lion and the lamb could lie down together in peace. In today’s hectic world, this depiction comes as a wish for peace in our world and peace in our lives.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Comet Wild 2
is available as an image download. This is an original, hand-drawn charcoal rendering of Comet Wild 2, also known as Comet 81P/Wild. Comet Wild 2 (pronounced "Vilt 2") was discovered in photos taken January 6 and 8 of 1978 by Paul Wild of the Astronomical Institute of Berne, Switzerland. Comet Wild 2 currently has an orbital period of about 6.4 years. Its perihelion distance (closest point to the sun) is 1.592 AU, or 1.592 times the average distance between the earth and the sun. The original charcoal rendering was completed in September of 2005. Based on the images taken by the Stardust spacecraft during the encounter of January 2, 2004, the rendering honors this inspiring and rare visit to a comet in interplanetary space.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Comet Tempel 1
is available as an image download. This is an original, hand-drawn charcoal rendering of Comet Tempel 1, also known as Comet 9P/Tempel. Comet Tempel 1 was discovered on April 3, 1867 by German astronomer Ernst Wilhelm Leberecht Tempel while visually searching for comets from Marseille, France. As the comet's name implies, this is the first of multiple comet discoveries by Tempel (the second being Comet 10P/Tempel, or Tempel 2, discovered in 1873). Comet Tempel 1 currently has an orbital period of about 5.5 years. Its perihelion distance (closest point to the sun) is 1.506 AU, or 1.592 times the average distance between the earth and the sun. The original charcoal rendering was completed in July of 2005. Based on a study of the many images taken by the Deep Impact spacecraft during the encounter of July 4, 2005, the rendering honors this inspiring and rare visit to a comet in interplanetary space.