18th Dec 2017 IRCMC Christmas Party

There will be a Christmas Carvery Dinner - 7.30 for 8.00pm start on Monday 18th December at Greshams.  

All members should have received an eMail with booking details. If you have any questions please email the club (IRCMClub@gmail.com)

6th Nov 2017, AGM
Click here for Calling Notice and Agenda
Click here for Nominations and Proposal form 

4th Sept 2017, Includes discussion of BMFA Guidance Notes

    Click here for a copy

7th Aug, BBQ evening at Gosbeck

Monday night  sees our third and final BBQ evening at Gosbeck. This is the day following our Bentwaters BBQ which seemed to work quite well last year. 

Usual format, the BBQ will be in action from about 6-30pm. Burgers £1, Hot dogs £1 and drinks 50p. 

Should the weather happen to be be against us then this evening will be postponed until the following Monday (14th August). 


6th August, Annual Fun Fly and BBQ

This coming Sunday (6th August) will be our annual BBQ and Fun fly at Bentwaters from 10am. All club members and families are encouraged to come along (don't forget a model or two) to what should be an enjoyable day. 

We are planning to do some glider towing demonstrations which is always entertaining to watch along with some 'themed slots' in the form of similar model types, warbirds, aerobatic aircraft etc. There will also be some informal competitions throughout the day which should be suitable for most model types and pilot abilities. 

There will also be a prize draw with some great prizes to be won and not forgetting the BBQ which will be on site to supply the hungry with hot dogs and burgers (usual prices apply, £1 for hot dogs, £1 for burgers and 50p for drinks). 

All model types are welcome and all members are welcome to fly. 

BBQ and Fun Fly, Sun 6th Aug


12th June, Hawker Restorations visit.

Last Monday members of the IRCMC had the opportunity to visit “Hawker Restorations” at Elmsett Airfield. What an interesting evening it was and an extremely helpful and knowledgeable staff member (Rich) on duty to answer all our questions.  A big thank you to Hawker Restorations and especially Rich.

The nearly complete Hurricane being restored was found on the beach at Dunkirk. Here are a couple of link to articles about the plane:

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/ww2-hurricane-crash-landed-dunkirk-9805734         

    http://aerodynamicmedia.com/hawker-hurricane-downed-over-dunkirk-about-to-return-to-the-skies/


Below are photos from the visit followed by a write up all kindly provided by Kevin Ellis.

Hawker Restorations


********************

Rarely do people get the chance to see a part of our heritage up close and personal, without the customary red ropes and striped tape that adorn most exhibits in the museums and historical buildings that reside in this fair green island.

Monday the 12th of June was an ordinary Monday. The evening promised something quite extraordinary however. Marked on the Flypast Calendar proudly taking centre stage on the fridge door, big bold letters read; 'DX-R'.

Now I know this means very little to most of the population, however to a few of us aviation enthusiasts and modellers, these three letters mean something special.

The sun was cooling off for the day and beginning to recede toward the horizon, as we turned the corner and approached the hanger doors, a black nose about 10 feet off the ground became apparent.

Behind the nose lay one of those truly awe inspiring pieces of British engineering.

A Hawker Hurricane MK 1.

Standing proudly looking as if it was eager to get in the blue yonder above, P2909 was nearing completion of a complete rebuild. Only a matter of hours, ground testing the fearsome RR Merlin III and she would once again feel the wind beneath her wings.

I will here, give a very brief history of this machine. Hawker Hurricane Mk 1 (P2909) produced by the Gloster Aircraft Company at Brockworth, It was charged operational on the 13th of May 1940.

On the 19th of May it was issued to 245 Squadron and given the code DX-R, stationed at Drem in Scotland. 245 Squadron A Flight was involved in fighting the Battle of France, so this machine allocated to B flight, was sent to Hawkinge to fly patrols over the channel and cover the evacuation of Dunkirk.

On the 31st of May DX-R took to the air as part of a 12 ship flight, with Pilot Office Kenneth McGlashon at the controls. Not long into their sortie, they spotted a gaggle of German bombers heading for Dunkirk and the flight lead immediately began his attack.

As the engagement began McGlashon found himself the target of two BF-109's and haven taken several hits and attempting to remove oil and glycol from his eyes, he put his 'Hurri' into a dive to attempt to lose the assaulting enemy aircraft. Having taken substantial damage to the airframe and fearing for his safety, he crash landed the aircraft on a stretch of Beach at Dunkirk.

He made it back to England via a Thames paddle steamer and was reunited with his Squadron in the early hours of the next day. Surviving the war, Kenneth McGlashon became a Squadron Leader and was awarded the Air Force Cross in 1950.

So now you know a little about this great machine, what its stands for and one can only imagine the excitement and joy that people will feel once this thoroughbred warplane is back in the skies again and displaying to the public.

Hosting us for the evening was a thoroughly nice chap by the name of Rich Bower, one of the highly skilled and ever decreasing number of specialist engineers able to work on these historic machines.

Rich knows his stuff, as you’d expect. With a complete walk-around (gold dust to us scale modellers!), unfettered by ropes or prohibitive signage, we spent a couple of hours questioning and watching tentatively as he explained the Flare shoot operation, the construction of one of the main gear Oleo’s, and what foibles are characteristic of the supercharger and carburettor of the Merlin III.

I cannot thank enough, the chaps and ‘powers that be’ for allowing this opportunity for our club, and especially Rich for staying late after work, well beyond his dinner time!

More so, my thanks and admiration is due for the companies that take on these historical time pieces, restoring them from sometimes what appears to be a complete mess of steel aluminium and fabric. Their dedication to the cause is beyond what most people would commit and we all benefit from the work they do to preserve our nation’s history.

I could not end this piece without offering thanks to the hundreds of young men, ‘The Few’.

Some as young as 17 who gave their lives in machines like this one, to protect our freedoms from tyranny.

It is they who live on through these historic aircraft and the teams of people who dedicated their lives to preserving them.

If you’re lucky enough, one fine day to hear a Merlin overhead, just stop for a second, and listen to that fabulous song in the sky, and spare a thought for those dashing young men, ever soaring in the Deep Blue.

KE 2017