Contributors

    Live JMM 2012 Moderator:

      Ami Radunskaya earned her doctorate at Stanford University in 1992 completing a dissertation on the statistical properties on Bernoulli flows. Prior to her doctorate she worked at AT&T Bell Labs. Since that time her research has expanded into mathematical biology: the modeling and imaging of tumors and the effectiveness of chemotherapy. She is currently a professor at Pomona College. In 2010 she was selected to serve as the Falconer Lecturer at MathFest.

    Live JMM 2012 Panelists:

      Ruth Haas earned her doctorate from Cornell University in 1987 and is currently the chair of Mathematics and Statistics at Smith College. Her research includes areas in algebraic combinatorics as well as graph theory. She is the co-director for the Center of Women in Mathematics, whose post-baccalaureate program was named a Program that Makes a Difference by the AMS in 2011. She has given invited addresses around the world, has had NSF support for research, conferences and infrastructure programs. She has over 25 co-authors, ranging from undergraduate students to emeriti faculty.

      Trachette L Jackson earned her doctorate from the University of Washington in 1998. She has worked as a visiting scientist at the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory at the Environmental Protection Agency and as a postdoc at Duke University. In 2003 she was awarded an Sloan Fellowship. She is currently an Associate Professor at U Michigan. Her research is both applied and pure with important results in both biological mathematics and nonlinear partial differential equations.

      Jill Pipher earned her doctorate from UCLA in 1985. She worked at the University of Chicago before coming to Brown University where she won a Presidential Young Investigator Award. Her research is in Harmonic Analysis, Elliptic Partial Differential Equations and Cryptography. She is a cofounder of NTRU Cryptosystems, Inc, and currently serves as the director of the Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics at Brown University.

      Ulrica Wilson earned her doctorate at Emery University in 2004. She has won a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship and a Woodrow Wilson National Foundation Fellowship. Her research is in combinatorial matrix theory and noncommutative ring theory. She has conducted research with undergraduates funded by the NSF and by the NSA. She is currently an assistant professor at Morehouse College.

    Online Moderator:

      Christina Sormani earned her doctorate at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at NYU in 1996. Her research is in Geometric Analysis and Metric Spaces. She is currently a faculty member at Lehman College and the CUNY Graduate Center City where she conducts NSF funded research with doctoral students. She gave a Plenary Address at the XXIV Geometry Festival in 2009.

    Online Panelists:

      Stephanie Alexander earned her doctorate in 1967 at University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign and is now a professor in the same department. She is a geometer specializing in metric spaces, Alexandrov geometry, Riemannian geometry, Lorentz geometry and applications of geometry to robotics. After establishing herself as a major figure in the geometric community, she began a long term highly successful collaboration in 1987 with her doctoral advisor Richard Bishop, which has produced 21 papers and counting. She has had six doctoral students, one of whom is already a famous geometer, currently has three doctoral students, and regularly coauthors with young mathematicians including her prior students.

      Lenore Cowen earned her doctorate at MIT in 1993 and is currently a professor in the Computer Science Department at Tufts University. She completed a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins University.   She has been named an ONR Young Investigator and a fellow of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Her research interests span three areas: Discrete Mathematics, Algorithms and, most recently, Computational Molecular Biology. She has coauthored with biologists, applied mathematicians and pure mathematicians in large groups and in pairs and has published almost fifty papers.  She is on the editorial boards of the SIAM Journal on Discrete Mathematics and of SIAM Review.

      Natasha Dobrinen earned her doctorate in mathematics from the University of Minnesota in 2001 and is currently a faculty member at the University of Denver. She was an FWF Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Kurt Gödel Research Center for Mathematical Logic at the University of Vienna and an NSF VIGRE S. Chowla Research Assistant Professor in the Mathematics Department at the Pennsylvania State University. She is a logician with research in Set Theory, Boolean Algebras, Recursion Theory and Measure Theory. She has written 16 papers with three different coauthors.

      Ruth Haas earned her doctorate from Cornell University in 1987 and is currently the chair of Mathematics and Statistics at Smith College. Her research includes areas in algebraic combinatorics as well as graph theory. She is the co-director for the Center of Women in Mathematics, whose post-baccalaureate program was named a Program that Makes a Difference by the AMS in 2011. She has given invited addresses around the world, has had NSF support for research, conferences and infrastructure programs. She has over 25 co-authors, ranging from undergraduate students to emeriti faculty.

      Trachette L Jackson earned her doctorate from the University of Washington in 1998. She has worked as a visiting scientist at the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory at the Environmental Protection Agency and as a postdoc at Duke University. In 2003 she was awarded an Sloan Fellowship. She is currently an Associate Professor at U Michigan. Her research is both applied and pure with important results in both biological mathematics and nonlinear partial differential equations.

      Linda Keen earned her doctorate from New York University in 1964. She spent a post-doctoral year at the Institute for Advanced Study before coming to CUNY. During her career at CUNY she has held visiting positions at UC Berkeley, Columbia, Boston University and Princeton. Her research is in Teichmuller theory, Kleinian groups and Complex Dynamics. She held an NSF Fellowship for women and has received NSF funding for her research. She has given invited addresses to AMS, MAA and was a Noether lecturer. She was the founding editor of Conformal Geometry and Dynamics and was a Coordinating Editor of PAMS for 10 years. She served as President of AWM in 1984-85 and as Vice President of AMS in 1991-93. She also served as a Trustee of AMS from 1999-2009 and as Associate Treasurer in 2010-11.

      Dianne P. O'Leary earned a doctorate in Computer Science from Stanford in 1976 and is currently a professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Maryland. She has conducted research on computational linear algebra, scientific computing, and optimization. The work has involved a mixture of algorithm development and scientific applications, drawing upon tools in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science. This work has been published in computer science and applied mathematics journals as well as journals of physics, chemistry, aerospace engineering, biol- ogy, medicine, and electrical engineering. She has also published work and given presentations on mentoring and leadership. She gave the AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalevsky Lecture in 2008.

      Jill Pipher earned her doctorate from UCLA in 1985. She worked at the University of Chicago before coming to Brown University where she won a Presidential Young Investigator Award. Her research is in Harmonic Analysis, Elliptic Partial Differential Equations and Cryptography. She is a cofounder of NTRU Cryptosystems, Inc, and currently serves as the director of the Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics at Brown University.

      Ami Radunskaya earned her doctorate at Stanford University in 1992 completing a dissertation on the statistical properties on Bernoulli flows. Prior to her doctorate she worked at AT&T Bell Labs. Since that time her research has expanded into mathematical biology: the modeling and imaging of tumors and the effectiveness of chemotherapy. She is currently a professor at Pomona College. In 2010 she was selected to serve as the Falconer Lecturer at MathFest.

      Marie Vitulli earned her doctorate in mathematics at U Penn in 1976 and is currently a professor at the University of Oregon. Her research is in commutative algebra and its interactions with algebraic geometry. In addition to her fundamental research in seminormal and weakly normal rings and algebraic varieties, she has been deeply involved in the concerns of women in mathematics. She created and maintains the Women in Math Web Project and coauthored the well known Notices articles "Are Women getting all the Jobs?".

      Ulrica Wilson earned her doctorate at Emery University in 2004. She has won a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship and a Woodrow Wilson National Foundation Fellowship. Her research is in combinatorial matrix theory and noncommutative ring theory. She has conducted research with undergraduates funded by the NSF and by the NSA. She is currently an assistant professor at Morehouse College.