IT Courses

Pathway Options

Audio Engineering 

Adobe Visual Design(CHS and CHHS) -- 11312X0
Honors Adobe Visual Design -- 11315X0
Prerequisite: None
Note: State-mandated End-of-Course test

This course is a project-based course that develops ICT, career, and communication skills in print and graphic design using Adobe tools.  This course is aligned to Adobe Photoshop, Indesign, and Illustrator certification.  English language arts are reinforced.  Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Adobe Digital Design   (CHS and CHHS) -- 11322X0
Honors Adobe Digital Design -- 11325X0
Prerequisite: Adobe Visual Design
Note: State-mandated End-of-Course test

This course is a project-based course that develops ICT, career, and communication skills in Web design and animation using Adobe tools.  This course is aligned to Adobe Dreamweaver and Flash certification.  English language arts are reinforced.  Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include job shadowing.  SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

AOIT Honors Audio Engineering -- BL205X0
Prerequisite: AOIT Web Design, Multimedia & Webpage Design, or Adobe Visual Design

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teach with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. Students demonstrate their abilities to use 21st century skills. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Computer Engineering

Computer Engineering Technology I - (CHHS) -- II212X00
Honors Computer Engineering Technology I - (CHHS) -- II215X00
Prerequisite: None
Note: State-mandated End-of Course test

This course includes the hardware skills required for installing and maintaining computers. It includes objectives in the following four domains, a) PC Hardware, b) Networking c) Mobile Devices, and d) Hardware and Network Troubleshooting. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. This course helps prepare students for the CompTIA A+ credential. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Honors Computer Engineering Technology II - (CHHS) -- II225X00
Prerequisite: Honors Computer Engineering Technology I
Note: State-mandated End-of Course test
Weighted Credit For Honors courses: Students will receive +1 / Effective with the Freshman class of 2015-16,the weighting of Honors courses shall be one-half (.5).
Weighted credit is determined by the State Board of Education.

This course includes operating systems and troubleshooting (including troubleshooting of hardware). It includes the following five domains
  1. Windows Operating Systems,
  2. Other operating systems and technologies,
  3. Security,
  4. Software Troubleshooting, and
  5. Operational procedures 
English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced.  Work- based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, internship, and job shadowing. 

This course helps prepare students for the CompTIA A+ credential. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to
apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.
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Network Engineering

Honors Network Engineering Technology I -- II115X00
Prerequisite: None
Note: State-mandated End-of Course test
Weighted Credit For Honors courses: Students will receive +1 / Effective with the
Freshman class of 2015-16,the weighting of Honors courses shall be one-half (.5). 
Weighted credit is determined by the State Board of Education.

This course uses Cisco Routing and Switching - Introduction to Networks curriculum and must be conducted using the Cisco Networking Academy connection. Cisco Introduction to Networks covers networking architecture, structure, and functions. The course introduces the principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of the course, students will be able to:
  • Explain network technologies.
  • Explain how devices access local and remote network resources.
  • Describe router hardware.
  • Explain how switching operates in a small to medium-sized business network.
  • Design an IP addressing scheme to provide network connectivity for a small to medium-sized business network.
  • Configure initial settings on a network device.
  • Implement basic network connectivity between devices.
  • Configure monitoring tools available for small to medium-sized business networks.
English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, internship, and job shadowing. This course helps prepare students for the Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) certificate. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Honors Network Engineering Technology II -- II125X00
Prerequisite: Honors Network Engineering Technology I
Note: State-mandated End-of Course test
Weighted Credit For Honors courses: Students will receive +1 / Effective with the
Freshman class of 2015-16,the weighting of Honors courses shall be one-half (.5).
Weighted credit is determined by the State Board of Education.

This course uses Cisco Routing and Switching: Routing and Switching Essentials curriculum and must be conducted using the Cisco Networking Academy connection. Routing and Switching Essentials covers the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. 
By the end of the course, students will be able to:
  • Determine how a router will forward traffic based on the contents of a routing table.
  • Explain how switching operates in a small to medium-sized business network.
  • Use monitoring tools and network management protocols to troubleshoot data networks.
  • Configure monitoring tools available for small to medium-sized business networks.
  • Configure initial settings on a network device.
  • Configure Ethernet switch ports.
  • Implement VLANs.
  • Implement static routing.
  • Implement DHCP on a router.
  • Implement network address translation (NAT).
  • Implement access control lists (ACLs) to filter traffic.
English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, internship, and job shadowing. This course can help prepare students for the Cisco CCENT certificate. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential  standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Honors Network Engineering Technology III -- II135X00
Prerequisite: Honors Network Engineering Technology II
Note: State-mandated End-of Course test
Weighted Credit For Honors courses: Students will receive +1 / Effective with the Freshman class of 2015-16,the weighting of Honors courses shall be one-half (.5).
Weighted credit is determined by the State Board of Education.

This course provides content for advanced networking engineering.  This course is designed for networking students who are seeking their Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certificate. This course uses the Cisco Routing and Switching: Scaling Networks curriculum and must be conducted using the Cisco Networking Academy connection. Scaling Networks covers the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in larger and more complex networks. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality.

By the end of this course, students will be able to: 
  • Configure and troubleshoot routers and switches
  • Resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, and STP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks
  • Implement a WLAN in a small-to-medium network
English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, internship, and job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Game Development 

Adobe Visual Design(CHS and CHHS) -- 11312X0
Honors Adobe Visual Design -- 11315X0
Prerequisite: None
Note: State-mandated End-of-Course test

This course is a project-based course that develops ICT, career, and communication skills in print and graphic design using Adobe tools.  This course is aligned to Adobe Photoshop, Indesign, and Illustrator certification.  English language arts are reinforced.  Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Scientific and Technical Visualization I - (CHHS and East) -- TS212X00
Honors Scientific and Technical Visualization I -- TS215X00
Prerequisite: None
Note: State-mandated End-of Course test

This course introduces students to the use of complex graphic tools. Emphasis is placed on the principles, concepts, and use of complex graphic and visualization tools as applied to the study of science and technology. Students use complex 2D graphics, animation, editing, and image analysis tools to better understand, illustrate, explain, and present technical, mathematical, and/or scientific concepts and principles. Emphasis is placed on the use of computer-enhanced images to generate both conceptual and data-driven models, data-driven charts and animations. Science, math, and visual design concepts are reinforced throughout the course. Activities are structured to integrate physical and social sciences, mathematics, English language arts, and art. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include mentorship, school- based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Honors Game Art & Design -- TS315X00
Prerequisite: Scientific and Technical Visualization I
Note: State-mandated End-of Course test
Weighted Credit For Honors courses: Students will receive +1 / Effective with the Freshman class of 2015-16, the weighting of Honors courses shall be one-half (.5).
Weighted credit is determined by the State Board of Education.

This course introduces students to techniques used in the electronic game industry. Students will focus on the principles used in game design including mathematical and virtual modeling. Emphasis is placed on areas related to art, history, ethics, plot development, storyboarding, programming, 2D visual theory, and interactive play technologies. Students develop physical and virtual games using hands-on experiences and a variety of software. Art, English language arts, mathematics and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

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Computer Programming

App Development with Swift (CHHS) -- CS952X0SIT
Prerequisite: None

App Development with Swift is a pilot course designed to help you build a solid foundation in programming fundamentals using Apple’s open-source programming language called Swift.  Throughout this course, you’ll get practical experience with the tools, techniques, and concepts needed to build a basic iOS app from scratch. You’ll also learn user interface design principles which are fundamental to programming and making great apps. The structure of the course is to learn by doing, with hands-on activities, including playgrounds and app projects in Xcode on the Mac. Each lesson is designed so that you learn programming concepts as you write code.  Through the first semester, you’ll build everything from an interactive chat bot to use what you learned about strings to a Rock/Paper/Scissors app to apply game logic. Through the second semester, you’ll expand your learning by building increasingly more robust apps from Around the World which used the knowledge of tables to an API project that displays photos of galaxies taken from satellites that integrates concepts of user interface, model data, and controller objects.

AP Computer Science -- 2A027X0
Prerequisite: None

This is a college-level introductory course in computer science. Because the design and implementation of computer programs to solve problems involve skills that are fundamental to the study of computer science, a large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs that correctly solve a given problem. These programs should be understandable, adaptable, and when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and formal methods. In addition, the responsible use of these systems is an integral part of the course. The course is designed to be the equivalent of a first-semester college course in computer science. Mathematics is reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Further information about the course and the AP Computer Science Exam can be found at http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/sub_compscia.html

Computer Science Principles
Prerequisite: None

Computer Science Principles is a rigorous, introductory honors-level course intended to familiarize students with the general concepts and thinking practices of computing, computer science, and information science. Students will learn computing concepts through authentic visual and interactive projects using the BYOB/SNAP, GameMaker and AppInventor visual programming languages. Students will focus on the "big CS ideas" in creative ways that emphasize conceptual knowledge and thinking practices rather than on programming alone. The big ideas in CSP include computing as a creative activity, abstraction, facilitating knowledge creation through computing, algorithms, problem-solving, the Internet, and the global impact of computing. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving, communication, creativity, and exploring the impacts of computing on how we think, communicate, work, and play. Art, English language arts, and mathematical concepts are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include entrepreneurship, mentorship, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Advanced Course Options 

AOIT Honors CTE Advanced Studies -- CS955X00
Prerequisite: Academy Junior
Note: 150 hours is required for one unit of credit

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teach with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. Students demonstrate their abilities to use 21st century skills. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

Internship Seminar

AOIT Internship Seminar
Prerequisite: Academy Junior

Note: 150 hours is required for one unit of credit The internship seminar is offered during the summer, between the 11th and 12th grade years. Sessions during their junior year will prepare AOIT students for the six-week summer internship. The curriculum was created by the National Academy Foundation (NAF) and its industry partners. Sessions include preparation of letters of application, application, resume and portfolio. Interview preparation includes industry presentations and role play workshops.