Advancing Climate Policy

I convene the Interdisciplinary Working Group on Advancing Climate Policy at Concordia University with Alexandra Lesnikowski. This group brings together researchers, students, and members of the Montreal community to develop a better shared understanding of the opportunities and constraints on climate action. Participants are only responsible for reading and discussing the texts assigned for each meeting. This is an open environment that welcomes Concordians interested in climate policy, from all levels and disciplines. Please contact Owen Miller to be added to the email distribution for reminders and papers.

In fall 2022, we meet on the following Fridays from 14:45--16:00 in HB 1220.

PDF version here


Friday Oct. 14: Public support for climate policy

  • Thomas Douenne and Adrien Fabre (2022). “Yellow vests, pessimistic beliefs, and carbon tax aversion”. American Economic Journal: Economic Policy 14.1, pp. 81–110. doi: 10.1257/pol.20200092

  • Parrish Bergquist, Matto Mildenberger, and Leah Stokes (2020). “Combining climate, economic, and social policy builds public support for climate action in the US”. Environmental Research Letters 15.5, p. 054019. doi: 10.1088/1748-9326/ab81c1


Friday Nov. 4: Stranded assets and just transition

  • Gregor Semieniuk et al. (2022). “Stranded fossil-fuel assets translate to major losses for investors in advanced economies”. Nature Climate Change, pp. 1–7. doi: 10.1038/s41558-022-01356-y

  • Nikhar Gaikwad, Federica Genovese, and Dustin Tingley (2022). “Creating climate coalitions: Mass pref- erences for compensating vulnerability in the world’s two largest democracies”. American Political Science Review, 1–19. doi: 10.1017/S0003055422000223


Friday Nov. 25: Event attribution and climate litigation

  • Friederike E. L. Otto et al. (2022). “Causality and the fate of climate litigation: The role of the social superstructure narrative”. Global Policy, pp. 1–15. doi: https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.13113

  • Erik Voeten (2022). “Do domestic climate rulings make Paris treaty commitments more credible? Evidence from stock market returns”. Paper presented at the 14th annual conference of the Political Economy of International Organization, pp. 1–23. url: https://www.peio.me/wp-content/uploads/PEIO14/PEIO14_ paper_115.pdf


Friday Dec. 9: Limits to adaptation and climate-resilient development

  • Jochen Hinkel et al. (2018). “The ability of societies to adapt to twenty-first-century sea-level rise”. Nature Climate Change 8.7, pp. 570–578. doi: 10.1038/s41558-018-0176-z

  • Luke Kemp et al. (2022). “Climate endgame: Exploring catastrophic climate change scenarios”. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 119.34, e2108146119. doi: 10.1073/pnas.2108146119