People's Geography of Seattle

Currently in Seattle, a growing number of projects are exploring intersections among public histories, popular inquiry and creative praxis, and community activism. This is no doubt in reaction to the immense scale and rate of displacement, disruption, and reconfiguration of both built and social environments through ongoing processes of urban development and transformation. The aim of the People's Geography of Seattle Project is to help forge connections between such different projects, bring them into conversation with each other to identify emergent common interests and questions, facilitate cooperative support, and build collective infrastructures for the ongoing development of these projects, according to their priorities.

Past Events:

WHEN

Thursday, Apr. 26, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.

DESCRIPTION

How can popular education use people’s everyday experience of landscape to illuminate historical struggles and power dynamics? In this talk, Laura Pulido discusses two projects: A People’s Guide, a radical tour guide, and Sangre en la Tierra (Blood in the Soil) a historical atlas. Both projects aim to transform people’s experience and understanding of place as a site of racial history and struggles for social justice.

Laura Pulido is professor and head of Ethnic Studies and professor of geography at the University of Oregon. Her current teaching and research focus on white supremacy, environmental justice, landscape, and popular education. She is the author of several books, including Environmentalism and Economic Justice: Two Chicano Struggles in the Southwest (Arizona 1996), Black, Brown, Yellow and Left: Radical Activism in Los Angeles (UC Press 2006), and A People’s Guide to Los Angeles (with Laura Barraclough and Wendy Cheng, UC Press, 2012).

LOCATION:

University of Washington Bothell


February 7, 2018: Public Conversation at the Central Library, Seattle Public Library (Listen to a podcast of the event here)

Currently in Seattle, a growing number of projects are exploring intersections among public histories, inquiry and community activism. This is no doubt in reaction to the immense scale and rate of displacement, disruption, and reconfiguration of both built and social environments through ongoing processes of urban development and transformation. The aim of the People's Geography of Seattle Project is to help forge connections between these different projects, bring them into conversation with each other to identify emergent common interests and questions, and facilitate cooperative support for ongoing development of these projects according to their priorities.

This event brought together artists, scholars and activists looking at the changing geographies and histories of the Seattle region. Many of these projects are combining a critical understanding of culture, politics, and ecology with forms of mapping and visual representation. This event highlighted public histories, documentary film and photography, and community driven environmental justice. These projects engage questions of change, narrative, rights, justice, health, and equity, both in the built environment and within communities.

The panel included Cynthia Brothers, Hodan Hassan, Jill Freidberg, and Cheuk-Ning Li.

Cynthia started Vanishing Seattle in 2016 to document the displaced & disappearing institutions, cultures & communities of Seattle. Raised in the 206, she admits to local clichés like playing in bands & once making espresso for a living. Proud alumna of the HS where Bruce Lee 1st demo’d his famous 1-inch punch. https://www.vanishingseattle.org/

Hodan Hassan is community organizer, writer and actor living in Seattle, WA . She has a Political Science degree from the University of Washington and is now working with the people of color led climate justice organization, Got Green. In her lifetime she hopes to have an impact on the fight for Black and collective liberation. When she is not working, especially during the fall, she's watching a ton of TV shows. http://gotgreenseattle.org/

Jill Freidberg is a documentary filmmaker, oral historian, radio producer, and youth media educator. Her current projects include The Shelf Life Community Story Project; Sharing Our Voices, a city wide oral-history project for Seattle Public Library; and teaching in the Media and Communications degree at UW Bothell. Her work reflects her belief that responsible, powerful storytelling builds understanding and solidarity across borders and across the street. https://www.shelflifestories.com/

Cheuk-Ning is a 1.5-gen Hong Kong immigrant to Renton. A 2016 Seeding Change Fellow with the Chinese Progressive Association in San Francisco's Chinatown, she currently organizes with the CID Coalition and Pacific Rim Solidarity Network (Parisol). She also interns for APALA's Membership Engagement Coordinator program, and will complete a BA in Comparative History of Ideas at UW-Seattle this Winter 2018. https://humbowsnothotels.wordpress.com/

Co-moderated by Amir Sheikh and Christian Anderson (UW-Bothell). This event is in collaboration with the Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences School,University of Washington-Bothell