Pallas Lab

Developmental Neurobiology

Our research is aimed at understanding the neural circuitry and cellular, and molecular mechanisms underlying development, plasticity, and evolution of visual and auditory pathways in the brain. We conduct basic neuroscience research that has implications for traumatic brain injury, optic nerve regeneration, learning and memory, and neurological diseases such as schizophrenia, epilepsy, and autism.

The Pallas Lab is currently in the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State University. As of summer 2019, we will move to the Neuroscience and Behavior Program in the Biology Department at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and create a new and much improved Pallas Lab!


[Image credit: M. Shribak and T. Balmer]

Current Contact Info:

Neuroscience InstituteGeorgia State UniversityP.O. Box 5030Atlanta, GA 30302spallas@gsu.edu

Contact after May 1, 2019:

Dept. of BiologyUniversity of Massachusetts221 Morrill Science Center III611 North Pleasant StreetAmherst, MA 01003-9297 spallas@umass.edu

WE ARE HIRING!! Funded positions are available for PhD and postdoctoral level scientists. Postdocs may apply at https://neurojobs.sfn.org/jobs

Below are some really cool movies that we made of transgenic mouse brains. These were made using an adaptation of the CLARITY method for imaging cleared whole brains in 3-D, with help from Joe Bergan and his lab at U Mass-Amherst (Isogai et al., 2017). These mice have GFP expression tied to Thy-1 expression. Thy-1 labels many different types of neurons, allowing for a nice demonstration of the utility of this method. We will use it to label particular neuron types and particular proteins that are involved in development and plasticity of visual pathways in the brain (see Research and Publications).


Isogai Y, Richardson DS, Dulac C, Bergan J. Optimized Protocol for Imaging Cleared Neural Tissues Using Light Microscopy. Methods Mol Biol. 2017;1538:137-153.
Light sheet photomicrography shows 3-D stack of images taken from a mid-sagittal view of a mouse brain labeled with Thy-1 GFP. Collaboration with laboratory of Joe Bergen, U Mass-Amherst.


Light sheet photomicrography shows 3-D stack of images taken of a mouse midbrain region labeled with Thy-1 GFP. Collaboration with laboratory of Joe Bergen, U Mass-Amherst.

Light sheet photomicrography shows 3-D stack of images taken of a mouse optic nerve labeled with Thy-1 GFP. Collaboration with laboratory of Joe Bergen, U Mass-Amherst.