Professor

Dr. Youngblood is committed to science and engineering education at all levels and is a strong supporter of a mixed pedagogy (or andragogy if you prefer) involving elements of Socratic delivery, formal lecture, practical experience, and relevant examples with homework and projects that reinforce key concepts.

Dr. Youngblood served as a Computer Science Professor from 2006-2018 (on campus from 2006-2012) at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte earning tenure during his time there. He does miss some parts of his academic life, especially working with good students, but feels that he is making a bigger impact working at PARC. He may be open to teaching a course in the future as an adjunct professor.

Statement of Teaching

What we have learned, application of that knowledge, and the ability to learn more comprises some of the most important facets of an individual. As an educator, I believe it is my responsibility to develop these aspects in my students. Students should gain useful and practical knowledge both from a theoretical standpoint, in which they can conceptually understand the subject matter, and in an applied manner to solidify their understanding. Students should be given enthusiastic instruction grounded with good examples that help the student apply the theories being taught.

I believe in a mixture of effective mastery-learning teaching techniques involving formal lecture reinforced through homework and projects, evaluated through quizzes, and expanded in Socratic examinations of more advanced concepts. Courses should be thoughtfully designed and taught to help the students apply themselves in a variety of scenarios. Use of modern computer and projection equipment, interactive classroom technologies, state-of-the-art software, and well-developed multi-media material in the classroom can enhance the learning experience, solidify examples, maintain student interest, and maximize the transfer of knowledge. However, good old-fashioned board work can also be used very effectively, especially for teaching mathematical concepts and advanced algorithms.

Learning should not stop at the end of the course though, students should be equipped with the knowledge of how to continue building their skill sets and gain more knowledge and practice in the subject matter. This becomes a very useful skill that allows them to continue growth beyond the classroom and laboratory.

University Courses I have taught and/or designed

Game Design & Development Program

  • ITCS 4230/5230 Introduction to Game Design & Development*
  • ITCS 4231/5231 Advanced Game Design & Development*
  • ITCS 4232/5232 Game Design & Development Studio*
  • ITCS 4236/5236 Artificial Intelligence for Interactive Computer Games (Interactive AI)*

Computer Science

  • ITSC 8110 Introduction to Computing and Information Systems Research
  • ITCS 6156 Machine Learning
  • ITCS 3153 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

* I co-designed along with Tiffany Barnes the Undergraduate and Graduate Certificate Programs and all classes in the Game Design & Development at UNC Charlotte during my tenure there. Many graduates of that program have gone on to successful careers in both games and movies.

Additional Information

Typically only disgruntled students comment on public websites, but since it is public I might as well embrace some of it. Here is what some former students had to say... My RateMyProfessor Page. I think it is what you can expect from an MTV website. Remember when MTV was about music? I miss those days. Video may have killed the radio star, but apparently reality TV killed the video star. Anyway, there is some truth in the complaining—I am a tough professor, but many of my students have let me know that I more than most helped prepare them for their careers from a technical and professional view.

Attributions:Mortarboard icon by Icons8
Unless otherwise noted, all page and website content Copyright MCMLXX-MMXX by G. Michael Youngblood. All Rights Reserved.