Effectiveness of control

Problem:

"A greater emphasis of stating the goal of management at all levels of planning is required for management effectiveness to be assessed. Goals would need to be quantifiable and time-bound. " - Van Wilgen, B.W. & Wilson, J.R. (Eds.) 2018. The status of biological invasions and their management in South Africa in 2017. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Kirstenbosch and DST-NRF Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch.

Solutions:

  • Le Maitre & Forsyth (2018) developed an automated management unit control plan (MUCP) tool (click here to download and install software, here for compartments and here to download sample data)
  • Van Wilgen et al. (2017) assessed invasive alien plant control operations over several decades in the Kruger National Park
  • Kraaij et al. (2017) assessed the effectiveness of invasive alien plant management in the Garden Route National Park
  • Fill et al. (2016) assessed the effectiveness of invasive alien plant management in the Upper Berg River catchment
  • Van Wilgen et al. (2016) documented the historical costs and extent of efforts to control invasive alien plants in the protected areas of the Cape Floristic Region and estimated the resources that would be needed to bring the problem under control within a reasonable timeframe
  • Ntshotsho et al. (2016) explored the success of invasive alien plant clearing projects of the Working for Water Programme, using three case studies
  • Van Wilgen and Wannenburgh (2016) reviewed the achievements and challenges in the Working for Water programme
  • McConnachie et al. (2012) evaluated the cost-effectiveness of Working for Water in reducing invasive alien plant cover in the Krom and Kouga river catchments over 7 years
  • Le Maitre et al. (2012) developed a generic species and area prioritization model for use in prioritising invasive alien plant control operations in South Africa using the following spatial data and Forsyth et al. (2012) published a peer-reviewed scientific article on their methodology
  • Van Wilgen et al. (2012) assessed the effectiveness of the Working for Water programme over the past 15 years, by reviewing data from three national-level estimates of the extent of invasion, records of the costs and spatial extent of invasive species control operations, assessments of the effectiveness of biological control, and smaller-scale studies.
  • De Lange & Van Wilgen (2010) found that although an estimated R6.5 billion was lost every year due to invading alien plants, this would have amounted to an estimated additional R41.7 billion had no control been carried out