Teaching the Psychology of Men Web Resource Page





Introduction to the Page

The purpose of this web page is to promote the teaching of the psychology of men. Teaching Men’s Studies has existed since the 1980’s, but the teaching the psychology of men is a more recent development. There is a lack of information on how to teach the psychology of men. Additionally, what content should be included in courses at both the graduate and undergraduate level has gone unspecified.

In this web page, information, support, and resources are found for anyone planning to teach a course in the psychology of men or revise a course in the psychology of women or gender studies. The overall goal of the Teaching the Psychology of Men Web page is to help faculty and  graduate students preparing psychology of men courses in the classroom and in the community. 

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Background on Teaching the Psychology of Men (2003-2010) 

At the 2003 APA convention in Toronto, we had some provocative discussions about the status of the teaching of the psychology of men. The conversations were between Jim O’Neil (University of Connecticut), Chris Kilmartin (University of Mary Washington), Michael Addis (ClarkUniversity) and Jim Mahalik (Boston College). We agreed that the teaching the psychology of men was a critical but underdeveloped area in the Society for the Psychological Study of Men and Masculinity (SPSMM), Division 51 of the American Psychological Association. We also recognized that the teaching of the psychology of men had no official status in psychology. Moreover, we felt that developing pedagogy about men could advance the psychology of men as a discipline. We reasoned that by formalizing the teaching of the psychology of men that knowledge about men could develop more rapidly, become more coherent, and influential. We also concluded that promoting the teaching of the psychology of men could increase membership in Division 51 and promote more relevant research on boys and men. For these reasons, we decided to address this neglected area and increase its visibility in the profession of psychology.

Conclusions


We hope this orientation to the web page will be useful to those of you who are planning to create courses in the psychology of men. There is still much more work to be done, both theoretically and empirically, in understanding how to teach the psychology of men. In many ways, we have only just begun! I invite you to join in this important effort as we continue to explore how to teach the psychology of men. Please let us know if I can assist you in any way!

      My email address is: teachingthepsychologyofmen@gmail.com

      Jim O’Neil
      Department of Educational Psychology
      Neag School of Education
      Glenbrook Road
      Unit 2064
      University of Connecticut
      Storrs, CT 06269-2058