Interests

@nigelhcollier  Follow on Twitter


Research Interests

NLP, Information Extraction and Text Mining (e.g. for Biology and Health),Veracity Detection, Web and Social Media, Sentiment Analysis and Opinion Mining, Grounding of Language, Multi-modal NLP.

Roles and responsibilities

Welcome!  I am Director of Research in Computational Linguistics (Research Professor) based in the Section of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics (TAL) in the University of Cambridge and co-founder of the Language Technology Laboratory. I am also a Turing Fellow at the Alan Turing Institute for data science and artificial intelligence
. I am an Associate Editor of BMC Bioinformatics and a Faculty Member of F1000. Please see Activities for video lectures and a list of my role in recent seminars, conferences, workshops, etc.


News:
  • 8/2018 Prospective PhD students: I am happy to supervise NLP projects in areas such as information extraction and text mining (e.g. for biology and medicine), veracity detection, Web and social media, sentiment analysis and opinion mining, grounding of language, multi-modal NLP. Please make contact early (see below). There is also funding from the Alan Turing Institute - deadline end of November.
Upcoming events:
Current projects

EPSRC SIPHS (
EP/M005089/1): I am funded by a 1.2 million 5-year EPSRC fellowship to investigate the Semantic Interpretation of Personal Health messages on the Web (SIPHS) project. This is an international collaborative effort to leverage social media data for digital disease applications such as detecting infectious disease outbreaks and adverse drug reaction.

MRC PheneBank (
MR/M025160/1): I am PI on the PheneBank project. This project seeks to develop a new method for the identification and harmonisation of human phenotypes from the scientific literature as well as their associations to entities of interest such as diseases, genes and other phenotypes.

Recent publications

  1. Conforti, C., Pilehvar, M. T. and Collier, N. (2018), “Towards Automatic Fake News Detection: Asymmetric Stance Detection in News Articles”, in Proceedings of the First Workshop on Fact Extraction and Verificiation at EMNLP 2018, Brussels, Belgium (in press).
  2. Conforti, C., Pilehvar, M. T. and Collier, N. (2018), “Modeling the Fake News Challenge as an Asymmetric Stance Detection Task”, in Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Rumours and Deception in Social Media (RDSM) at CIKM 2018, Turin, Italy, (in press)
  3. Pilehvar, M. T., Prokhorov, V., Kartsaklis, D. and Collier, N. (2018), “CARD-660: A Reliable Evaluation Framework for RareWord Representation Models”, in Proceedings of the Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP 2018), Brussels, Belgium (in press).
  4. Kartsaklis, D., Pilehvar, M. T. and Collier, N. (2018), “Mapping Text to Knowledge Graph Entities byVector Space Transformation”, in Proceedings of the Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP 2018), Brussels, Belgium (in press).
  5. Le, H. Q., Can, D. C., Vu, T. S., Dang, T. H.., Pilehvar, M. T. and Collier, N. (2018), “Large-scale Exploration of Neural Relation Classification Architectures”, in Proceedings of the Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP 2018), Brussels, Belgium (in press).
  6. Gritta, M., Pilehvar, M. T., & Collier, N. (2018). “Which Melbourne? Augmenting Geocoding with Maps”, in Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 1285-1296.
  7. Gritta, M., Pilehvar, M. T., Limsopatham, N. and Collier, N. (2017), "Vancouver Welcomes You! Minimalist Location Metonymy Resolution", in Proceedings of the Association of Computational Linguistics Annual Meeting (ACL 2017), Vancouver, Canada, August, pp. 1248-1259. Download pdf.
  8. Pilehvar, M. T., Camacho-Collados, J., Navigli, R. and Collier, N. (2017), "Towards a Seamless Integration of Word Senses into Downstream NLP Applications", in Proceedings of the Association of Computational Linguistics Annual Meeting (ACL 2017), Vancouver, Canada, August, pp. 1857-1869. Download pdf.
  9. Camacho-Collados, J., Pilehvar, M. T., Collier, N., & Navigli, R. (2017). "Semeval-2017 task 2: Multilingual and cross-lingual semantic word similarity", In Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval 2017). Vancouver, Canada, August, pp. 6-17. Download pdf.
If you want to see a snapshot of my publications please follow the link to Google Scholar. Also available on the LTL publications page.

Teaching

At the University of Cambridge I am currently coordinator for the Computational Linguistics paper Li-18 in the Linguistics Tripos as well as a principal lecturer on the Biomedical Information Processing paper R214 in the Computer Science Tripos and MPhil in Advanced Computer Science course at the Department of Computer Science and Technology.

Prospective PhD students

I am delighted to consider applications for PhD project proposals from students with a strong background in computing, linguistics or AI. I do however receive a steady stream of such contacts and in order to save time request that in your initial message you (a) provide a brief overview of your project idea and - importantly - how it relates to my research interests, and (b) provide an up to date CV including overall course grades.

Activities - see here

Other background

Prior to joining the University of Cambridge I was a FP7 Marie Curie fellow on the PhenoMiner project at EMBL-EBI (2012-2014) and Associate Professor at the National Institute of Informatics in Tokyo where I led the Natural Language Processing laboratory. From 2007 - 2012 I served as a technology advisor on the international Global Health Security Action Group technical working group on Risk Management and Communication. I obtained my PhD in computational linguistics at UMIST in 1996 (now the University of Manchester) for my research into the application of neural networks for machine translation.

I am a senior member of the Association for Computing Machinery (1996 - present) and a member of the Association for Computational Linguistics (1996 - present).

Contact

Nigel Collier
Director of Research in Computational Linguistics, and
Co-Director of the Language Technology Lab
Section of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics
Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages
University of Cambridge
9 West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DB
United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0)1223-760373
Email: nhc30 AT cam dot ac dot uk

Office: Room TR-23, English Faculty Building

ORCID ID: 0000-0002-7230-4164 [Search Europe PMC]

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