Sounds

THE DEADBEATS On Tar Beach lp 1985 New Rose
Crazy When I Hear That Beat /New Girl / Don't Tell Joe / Fall In Love Tonite / Johnny Reb / Bobby / Delilah : When You Dance / Swan Lake / Sexy Sadie.
Produced by Vic Maile
The DeadBeats : S. May: vocals /T. Berrington: guitar /K. Green: bass / M. Robertson: drums .
The Deadbeats were formed in London in the early 1980's and were the brainchild of US born singer and songwriter Suzy May. Influenced by a mix of Rockabilly, 60's Soul, Country and greasy British Rock & Roll the core line up of the band was Suzy, Tony Berrington on guitar and Kevin Green on bass. Tony and Kevin hailed from Nottingham where they had played together in various groups since their school days. In London the group frequented the rocking scene based around Dingwalls Night Club and the Hope & Anchor. A number of drummers occupied the drum stool including Parker, Keith (from the Darts) and Gary Long (Tenpole Tudor). Finally Mark Robertson (ex Meteors) was recruited. The band recorded an independent single "Crazy Hound Dog/Crazy when I hear that Beat" with their management company at the time - Blackhill. Gary played drums on the A side, Parker on the B side. The band then signed to New Rose Records in France for who they recorded the LP "On Tar Beach" from which the single "New Girl" was released. The recordings were made at Jacksons Studios with the late great Vic Maile producing. The band toured sporadically in the UK (supporting the Stray Cats and Pogues amongst others) and undertook an eventful two week tour of France.They began demoing songs for a second album but split around 1987.Currently Suzy lives in Liverpool, Tony in London (he is the guitarist for Girls on Top),Kevin between Florida and the south coast of the UK and Mark in France.
 
 
TWENTY FLIGHT ROCKERS Ride lp 1988 Epic
Black Leather Jacket / Out Of Control / Fall In Love With You / I Can't Stop Dancing / Subway Train / We Are The Rockers / Heart Of Stone / King Of A Lonesome Road / Cadillac / Guns For Sale.
Twenty Flight Rockers : Gary Twinn: vocals /Danny B Harvey: guitar /Jeff Vine: bass / Mark Laff: drums .
 Twenty Flight Rockers was formed out of the ashes of Generation X by drummer Mark Laff and East London born singer Gary Twinn, who'd had a hit record in Australia with the band Supernaut. With guitarist Ian McKean and Jeff Vine on bass, they put together the band of their dreams. The kind of outfit they'd always wanted to see and hear. Musically they were digging Eddie Cochran, Elvis, Gene Vincent and Johnny Kidd but with a new post punk power and attitude. Visually they were The Beatles in Hamburg, leather, grease, motorbikes and birds. The sound was fresh, new and exciting. Just what the doctor ordered in those Duran/Goth poncy hairspray days. Twenty Flight Rockers reputation spread quickly and they were soon selling out clubs all over London. Their high regard as a live act grew such that they were named by the British music press as the top live band in the country and were subsequently invited to play the BBC's Janice Long show. ABC records release of Tower Block Rock/Weekend Revolution quickly entered the top 15 and the band was pursued and offered a deal by Warner Brothers Records. The Rockers wrote and recorded hours of material not only for an album but also three singles, a live album and an e.p. of their favourite rockn'roll covers. First release Johnny Seven just saw light of day when Warners fired most of their A&R dept and decided Madona and Prince were the only artists the British public needed to hear. Enter Bernard Rhodes. Mark knew Bernie Rhodes, the former Clash manager, from his own days with Subway Sect. Bernard saw the huge potential of TFR and immediately took the helm. He sent Gary to New York and encouraged him to write new songs from a broader perspective. Returning to London the new tracks were demoed but there was trouble in the ranks of TFR. Some members thought that others were being treated better than they. Ian was asked to leave and Danny B Harvey, from US band The RockCats, took over guitar. Bernard signed TFR to Epic Records in the States and a new album was made in Hollywood. First single Black Leather Jacket was receiving great reviews and heavy rotation by radio in LA, Detriot and New York. A US and UK tour was being planned when Epic was suddenly over-run by Sony and Twenty Flight Rockers once again found themselves with out a deal, broke and friendless.
 
 THE LOVELESS FILM SOUNDTRACK lp 1982 Roadshow
Relentless Title Theme - Eddie Dixon / Goodbye Baby - Robert Gordon / Calypso 17 Theme - Hollywood Studio Orchestra / So Young - Robert Gordon / Wasting My Time - Robert Gordon / I'm Dreaming Of You - Robert Gordon / Rip It Up - Little Richard / The Stroll - The Diamonds / Teen Beat - Sandy Nelson / Raunchy - Bill Justis / End Theme - Hollywood Studio Orchestra
 The period biker flick The Loveless marks the feature debut of both actor Willem Dafoe and writer/director Kathryn Bigelow. Bigelow co-wrote and co-directed the film with Monty Montgomery who would go on to produce Wild At Heart and The Portrait Of A Lady. Dafoe plays Vance, a stoic, leather-clad biker who rides into a small Southern town and to wait for some other bikers. Their plan is to travel on to Daytona for some racing, but they have to stick around the little truck stop town for a while to get one of their bikes repaired. Vance flirts a bit with Augusta (Liz Gans), a widowed waitress. She's the only local who's friendly to him and his gang. Contemplating living in such a depressed, isolated place, Vance tells her, "I think your husband had the right idea." While the bikes are worked on, Vance and the gang, including the abrasive Davis (rockabilly musician Robert Gordon who also composed the film's soundtrack) and his girlfriend, Debbie (Tina Lhotsky), spend the day in town, to the chagrin of the conservative residents. Vance hooks up with Telena (Marin Kanter), the rebellious teenage daughter of a rich redneck. Their little tryst creates even more tension, and the day ends with violence.

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Comments