About Me...

I am an Animal Behavioral and Infectious Disease Ecologist. The overarching theme of my research concerns the relative influences of socioecological factors (e.g. human impact, group sizes, infectious disease risk) and intrinsic characteristics (e.g. phylogenetic relationships, individual self-organization, personality) in influencing the evolution of group-living and social systems in animals. Stemming from this, I have also been combining epidemiological reasoning with social network approaches to understand the role of sociality in influencing animal health outcomes. The broader significance of my research lies in its implications for the understanding the evolution of communial group living in human societies, and for the conservation of both critically endangered and potentially problematic wildlife populations at human-wildlife interfaces.  
Although open to studying a variety of nonhuman animal systems, my work to-date has largely focused on captive and free-living groups of nonhuman primates, particularly macaques (Macaca sp.).