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Chris Frith FRS FmedSci FBA

Although I retired from  my position at the Wellcome Centre for Neuroimaging at UCL in 2007, I am  continuing to develop the new discipline of neural hermeneutics. This discipline concerns the neural basis of social interaction. I am fortunate in having a number of excellent  collaborators for this enterprise, in particular, Uta Frith.
In October 2011 I was elected a two-year fellow of All-Souls where I organised a series of seminars on Meta-cognition in order to explore the critical role of this process in sharing experiences. My main experimental work is currently performed in the interacting minds centre at Aarhus University. We are trying to delineate the mechanisms underlying this human ability to share representations of the world for it is this ability that makes communication possible.

We think that there are two major processes involved. The first is an automatic form of priming (sometimes referred to as contagion or empathy), whereby our representations of the world become aligned with those of the person with whom we are interacting. The second is a form of forward modelling, analogous to that used in the control of our own actions. Such generative Bayesian models enable us to predict the actions of others and use prediction errors to correct and refine our representations of the mental states of the person we are interacting with.

We are carrying out behavioural and brain imaging experiments that will delineate the neural mechanisms that underlie these two processes in healthy volunteers.

The results will be relevant for our understanding of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. One characteristic of the mistaken perceptions (hallucinations) and beliefs (delusions) associated with this disorder is their resistance to change in spite of their incompatibility with the beliefs and perceptions of others. This indicates a failure in the mechanism by which we align our representations of the world with those of others. Delineating the normal mechanisms of alignment will help us to identify the neural basis of hallucinations and delusions.

Directly emerging from these studies of interacting minds I have become increasingly interested in the role of culture: How it creates us and how we create it. I have been thinking about the role of culture in our experience of volition and responsibility. You can read about this in my essay in honour of Marc Jeannerod. I have also been thinking (again) about the problem of the top, in top-down control. There is no top within the individual person. We are all part of much bigger loops by which culture (other people) exerts top-down control on us while we in turn attempt to influence others. You can read about this in my recent essay on How the brain creates culture.


Recent Files

  • LeopoldinaText&Figs.pdf   503k - 2 Feb 2014 09:33 by Chris Frith (v1)
    ‎How the brain creates culture: Paper presented to the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, September 2013‎
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Recent Announcements

  • New Portrait http://www.flickr.com/photos/rosridley/8204037792/sizes/l/in/photostream/
    Posted 22 Nov 2012 07:57 by Chris Frith
  • Talking about Neural Hermeneutics The Art and Mind Dinner
    Posted 2 Jun 2012 03:42 by Chris Frith
  • The Emergence of Consciousness: A top-down, social phenomenon? Special issue of Pragmatics & Cognition 18:3 March 2011
    Posted 2 Jun 2012 03:50 by Chris Frith
Showing posts 1 - 3 of 5. View more »

Contact details

Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging

12 Queen Square - London - WC1N 3BG 

+44 (0)20 7833 7457

e: c.frith@ucl.ac.uk

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