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I am an economist and my research interests are broadly in the fields of health economics and behavioral economics. 

Currently, at UnitedHealthcare I have been working on issues related to the Affordable Care Act such as the Health Insurance Exchanges, Health Saving Account and the High-Deductible Health Plan. 

At the American Cancer Society, I have been working on the impacts of eating food away from home (i.e., fast-food and restaurant food) as well as sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on dietary intake and quality. I also work on the impacts of the National School Lunch program and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program on children and adults' dietary quality, especially among the underserved population. 

I received my PhD in Economics from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in 2013, and a BS in Finance from the National Economics University in Vietnam in 2006. I currently live in San Francisco Bay Area. I enjoy hiking, camping, cooking, and reading. The best way to reach me is through my email at binh211@gmail.com 

For my completed list of publication, please visit:



Here are some news outlets that cover my work: ·   

·     CNN  “Eating out costs you 200 calories

·    The Telegraph “Eating in restaurants no better than fast food for health

·    The Daily Mail  “Eating out is worse for your waistline than dining at home: Average restaurant meal contains 200 extra calories – regardless of whether it is fast food or fine dining

·    Consumer Affairs “Eating out – anywhere – leads to more calories, poorer nutrition

·    CBS News – Health Day “Eating out usually means eating more

·    Red Orbit “Federal food program puts food on the table but dietary quality could be improved”

·    Bloomberg Business “Pizza’s snack appeal leads to big impact on kids’ body

·    Time “Should I eat pizza

·    Slate “What happens when kids eat pizza

·    Washington Post Wonkblog “Your kids are getting way too many calories from pizza”

·    National Public Radio “Restaurant meals mean more calories and soda for kids and teens

·    Reuters “Eating in restaurants tied to higher calorie intake

·    US News “For kids, eating out = more calories”