Bridge Street Health Office

La Oficina de Salud de Bridge Street

(Por favor, pongase en contacto con la oficina principal si desea una traduccion al espanol)


Field Day is approaching!

Friday, June 8th


Be a Sun Smart Kid. Bring a hat, sunglasses, try to wear light colored clothing, and have someone responsible apply Sunblock and Bug Spray BEFORE you come to school.

Please send in an EXTRA T-Shirt because of certain activities involving water.

Bring a bottle of water with you to school so you will not get dehydrated.

It is VERY IMPORTANT to wear SHOES you will be able to run, jump, and play in, such as OLD Sneakers/Tennis Shoes.

PLEASE …..NO FLIP FLOPS OR SANDALS, as it is much easier to trip and fall and get hurt in this type of footwear.

RESPECT One Another. Be Kind and Considerate, and have a FUN and Healthy day.


May 7, 2018

If you received a hearing or vision screening referral form that I sent between the end of January through early April and have not had your child checked, please do so and return the form to me. There are many instances where a referral in either hearing or vision leads to further medical evaluzation whereby we discover students need glasses or even that their ears are unknowingly fiiled with wax/fluid which then causes some hearing loss.

May 4, 2018

Once the weather changes to heat and humidity, students often migrate to my office in search of somewhere cool to be. I urge kids and families at this point in the year to start packing ice water in your child's water bottle. Temperatures inside of the school can wilt students who aren't properly hydrated, and the ice inside the water bottles really helps keep them cool.

This is also the time of year for mosquito bites! Many, many students make their way to my office during the day so that I can apply Calamine lotion. To help keep students in class, I encourage you to check your kids in the morning before school and apply an anti-itch lotion to their bites.

It's also not a bad idea to apply both sunscreen and bug spray to your child before heading off to school.

From Mrs. Flaherty. . . Chef Solus' Healthy Tip of the Week of April 2, 2018

If your 4 year old gets 4 tablespoons of protein, he has met his daily protein needs.

March 28, 2018

Chef Solus is a character that our PE teacher, Mrs. Flaherty, uses for teaching purposes with her classes.

She will provide weekly healthy tips for the BSS family.

Chef Solus' Healthy Tip of the Week

Avoid foods with trans fat (you can find it in the label).

March 2, 2018

I often receive mail that contains relevant information to our students' and families' well-being. In honor of National Nutrition Month, below is a copy of a Nutrition newsletter that contains fun facts and ideas about eating healthy and keeping fit.

201803021314.pdf

February 5, 2018

Each month offers us a chance to learn about and help raise awareness for different health conditions and to recognize the people who may have them. I've previously mentioned that February is Heart Month; however, it is also Turner Syndrome Awareness Month. What do we need to know about this genetic condition? The website of the Turner Syndrome Society of the U.S. tells us it's a condition that occurs only in females and can be diagnosed as early as prenatal life all the way to adulthood. Increased awareness of this genetic condition has helped to decrease the age of diagnosis, which is ideal for treating the health conditions related to TS.

The only physical characteristic that is consistent among all females wit h TS is a short stature (average adult height is 4'8"), although there are many attributes that are linked to TS, such as visual/spatial learning challenges, heart abnormalities, and chronic ear infections. For a more comprehensive list, visit the Turner Syndrome Society of the U.S.

February 2, 2018

January 30, 2018

Influenza Information

Below are recommendations taken from the CDC to help reduce the spread of flu.

  • Get a yearly flu vaccine. Even though it doesn’t cover all strains, it is the single best way to protect against or shorten the severity of the flu. Talk to your health care provider about this. It's not too late to get the vaccine!
  • Stay home when sick. If you have a fever or signs of a fever (chills, feeling very warm, flushed appearance, or sweating), you should stay home for at least 24 hours until fever-free without the use of fever-reducing medicine.
  • Encourage all to cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or their bent arm. If they use a tissue, they should put the used tissue in a trash can and wash their hands.
  • Encourage frequent handwashing using soap and water for 20 seconds, dry hands with a paper towel, and use the paper towel to turn off the faucet. If soap and water are not available and hands are not visibly dirty, an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol may be used.
  • Encourage all to keep their hands away from their nose, mouth, and eyes.
  • Routinely clean surfaces and objects that are touched often, such as tables, desks, countertops, doorknobs, computer keyboards, hands-on learning items, faucet handles, and phones.
  • Studies have shown that the flu virus can live and potentially infect a person for only 2 to 8 hours after being deposited on a surface. Therefore, special sanitizing processes beyond routine cleaning are not necessary or recommended to slow the spread of flu, even during a flu outbreak.
  • Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website for more information at: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts.htm

January 24, 2018

In honor of February being Heart Health Awareness month, our PE teacher, Mrs. Flaherty will involve our BSS students in "Jump Rope for Heart". On February 12-14 you will find our students jumping rope during their PE classes and simultaneously learning how physical fitness benefits their hearts. We want our students to know how important physical activity is in their youth so that they become adults who are physically active, keeping their hearts and the rest of their bodies fit for life. There is also a fundraising component to this activity and the proceeds will be given to the American Heart Association to. Mrs. Flaherty will also add an educational component to this program. She says, "I will teach the physical health component by incorporating age-appropriate activities which are aligned with the Massachusetts State Frameworks".


Mrs. Flaherty, getting ready for Jump Rope For Heart, with her jump-rope.

January 10, 2018

Welcome to the new website of the Bridge Street School Health Office. I encourage you to flip through the pages of this site and visit throughout the school year. I'll be adding articles and important health reminders throughout the school year. Please be in touch if you have questions or comments.

Keeping Warm. . .

In order to stay warm and dry while playing in the snow during recess, your child must bring the following every day:

snow boots

snow pants

jacket

hat

mittens/gloves.

If missing one of these items, he/she will have to stay on the cleared walkway during recess in order to stay dry. Please contact me or Laurie Sperry if you need help outfitting your child for the snow. We are happy to help.

Also, Laurie Sperry and I always welcome donations (at any time of the year) of gently worn snow pants, snow boots, and snow gloves to share with other members of our BSS community. Even our youngest students, our preschoolers, are in need of several pairs of snow pants per class. We're able to store items for our yearly Winter-Clothing Exchange, a time when we get together as a school community and pass along (and also get to pick out) gently worn winter outerwear that our children have outgrown.

Image of child blowing nose into a tissue.

Winter Time Sickness

Make sure your child washes his/her hands. Often I have to remind students (of all ages) who use the health office bathroom to wash their hands afterwards.

Teach your child not to touch his/her eyes and nose.

Keep your child home when sick. Review the policy pasted below to remind yourself of when it makes sense to keep your child home.

BSS Illness Policy

Remember: Sick children belong at home. Well children belong in school. And the best way to prevent infections is frequent hand washing.

Children with a fever over 100° should stay home until there is no fever for 24 hours. Call your doctor if your child has a fever with pain, rash, weakness, vomiting or diarrhea.

If a child’s eye is red with cloudy or yellow/green drainage, you should call the doctor during office hours. If an eye ointment is prescribed your child may return to school 24 hours after treatment began. All family members should wash hands frequently.

Children with one event of vomiting or diarrhea (watery loose bowel movement) should stay at home until at least 12 hours have passed without any further events. Call your doctor if the vomiting or diarrhea continues or if your child also has a fever, rash, or weakness. All family members should wash hands frequently.

Your child should stay home if he/she has a lot of ear pain. Call your doctor for treatment.

If your child has a sore throat and a fever, or a severe sore throat without fever, he/she should stay home from school.

If your child’s cough is worse than you would expect with a cold, keep him/her at home. If he/she has hard time breathing or has a fever, call your doctor.

If your child complains of a stomach ache, especially if he/she says it hurts to move and he/she does not want to eat, he/she should stay home. Call your doctor.

If your child has impetigo (red, oozing blister areas with yellow-gold scabs on the face or body) he/she should stay home for as long as your doctor says.

REQUIREMENTS FOR PHYSICAL EXAM PAPERWORK

In Northampton at the elementary school level, we require students to have a physical exam on file in pre-K, kindergarten, and fourth grade. Many fourth grade parents have not yet sent in their child's annual physical form this year.

A good way to remember is to send in your child's well-visit form EVERY YEAR. That way those students do not have to go through the yearly mandated screenings and the health office is up to date on all allergies/health conditions.