Pre-K - Jefferson Math

Module 1 Part 1

In the first half of Module 1, children match and sort objects based on their attributes (e.g., color, size, use). Along the way they are shown as many as three objects and asked, “How many?” Touching one object at a time, they count to find the total, and match the count to a numeral.

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Module 1 Part 2

In the second half of Module 1, children touch and count groups of up to five objects arranged in different ways. They learn to match their count to a numeral 1–5. Children also see patterns in the counting sequence. When counting forward, they see each number is 1 more: One. One more is 2. Two. One more is 3.

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Module 2

In Module 2, children explore two- and three-dimensional shapes and objects. They identify these shapes by first noticing the characteristics, “This shape has four straight sides and four corners!” After this analysis, they learn the names, “It’s a rectangle!” Position words such as next to help them to make statements like, “The blue rectangle is next to the orange square.”

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Module 3 Part 1

In the first half of Module 3, students build on their work with numbers to 5 as they explore groups of 6, 7, and 8 objects. Children learn to touch and count up to 8 objects arranged in different ways (e.g., in a straight line or in rows) and extend their ability to make tallies, recognize numerals, and count on their fingers the Math Way (from left to right). Additionally, students strengthen their understanding of 1 more and discover different ways to take apart numbers (e.g., 7 cubes can be broken up into 5 cubes and 2 cubes).

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Module 3 Part 2

In the second half of Module 3, students build on their previous number work as they explore groups of 0, 9, and 10 objects. More time is spent with 10, since it is important for understanding place value in later grades. Children learn to touch and count up to 10 objects arranged in different ways (e.g., in a straight line or in a circle) and extend their ability to make tallies, recognize numerals, and count on their fingers the Math Way (from left to right). Students strengthen their understanding of 1 more and discover different ways to take apart numbers (e.g., 10 cubes can be broken up into 9 cubes and 1 cube).

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Module 4 Part 1

In Topics A–C of Module 4, students compare and explore lengths, weights, and capacities. For example, students learn to line up the endpoints when comparing length, use a balance scale to compare weight, and pour sand into containers of different sizes and shapes as they compare capacity.

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Module 4 Part 2

The second half of Module 4 begins with an exploration of first and last when objects are counted in linear, array, circular, and scattered arrangements. Students use the language of comparison they began to develop when working with length, weight, and capacity as they compare sets of up to 5 objects. This module culminates with students counting to compare sets of objects, “4 cats is more than 3 cats,” and finally, numbers, “4 is greater than 3.”

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Module 5 Part 1

In the first half of Module 5, students write numerals 0–5 and count to 20. They explore addition and subtraction stories with numbers 0–5, a natural way for them to understand adding to and taking from. Stories are acted out, modeled with objects, drawn, or solved using pictures. Children ask and answer questions about the story, such as “How many in all?” or “How many are left?” They learn to distinguish the question from the story.

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Module 5 Part 2

In the second half of Module 5, students continue to tell and solve addition and subtraction stories with numbers 0–5, now using fingers, cubes, math drawings, or numerals to represent the number of units (e.g., puppies) in the stories. For example, children solve, “Three puppies are playing. One puppy stops to rest. How many puppies are still playing?” using their fingers, cubes, or drawings of circles (see Spotlight on Math Strategies). In the final lessons, children replicate and extend patterns focusing on the repeating part of the pattern.

Parent Tip Sheet