Finding the patient

After three years of hard work in nursing school, you've graduated! It's your first day in your new job at the hospital working in the orthopedics unit. The charge nurse asks you to take a shoulder immobilizer to the ER for a patient who was in a car wreck. Not wanting to admit you don't know how to get to the ER, you leave the floor hoping there are signs to help you find it. Unfortunately, you exit from a stairwell into the basement instead of the first floor and the door into the stairs is locked. You've left your phone upstairs so you can't call for help. The basement seems to be home to some storage rooms and a couple of classrooms. In the first classroom, you notice a phone on the wall and go in. A quick check for a dial tone and you realize the phone is no longer in service. The door has locked behind you and oddly contains several combination locks that must be opened to get out. As you look around the room, you notice a periodic table, lab glassware, and a molecular model set. You have fond memories of your chemistry class and wonder if there are any clues in the room to help you open the locks so you start to explore.

Explore the items you find in the room to find clues to the lock combinations.

I, Sharayanan [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY-SA 2.5 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], from Wikimedia CommonsBy Kadykianus [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia CommonsCommunity College Consortium for Bioscience Credentials [CC BY 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)]