People


Director

Matthew P. Reed, Ph.D.
Research Professor, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI)
Research Professor, Center for Ergonomics, Industrial and Operations Engineering
University of Michigan

Dr. Reed is an Research Professor in the Biosciences Division of the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute and in the Center for Ergonomics in Industrial and Operations Engineering. His research addresses human interaction with engineered systems from anthropometric, biomechanical, and cognitive perspectives. At UMTRI his research focuses on occupant protection and physical ergonomics for vehicle occupants. He has conducted research on restraint systems, emphasizing restraint optimization, crash dummy positioning procedures, and child passenger safety. He has developed tools for the ergonomic design of vehicle interiors and workplaces, including posture prediction and motion simulation algorithms for use with digital human figure models. He holds a Ph.D. in Industrial and Operations Engineering from the University of Michigan, as well as Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in engineering from the University of Michigan. He is active on several Society of Automotive Engineers committees on vehicle interior design, occupant protection, and digital human modeling.

Director Emeritus


Don B. Chaffin, Ph.D.
Johnson Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering and Occupational Health
University of Michigan

Dr. Chaffin is the R.G. Snyder Distinguished University Professor (Emeritus) in Industrial and Operations Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Michigan. Dr. Chaffin has served as the past Director of the Center for Ergonomics, and as past Chair of the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering. His research has resulted in six books, over 140 peer reviewed journal articles, and over 300 Proceedings, book chapters and reports. He also has led a team of students and staff in developing a set of widely used software programs to assist engineers who are involved in designing workplaces and vehicles to accommodate various groups of people, and to assure that people do not suffer overexertion injuries during the performance of manual tasks of all kinds. He founded and for six years directed the Human Motion Simulation Laboratory in the Center for Ergonomics until his retirement in 2007. His work has resulted in election to Fellow status in six different international professional and scientific organizations, including the SAE, HFES, ASB, AIHA, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has received many national and international awards for his work, including being elected to membership in the prestigious US National Academy of Engineering in 1994, for his lifetime achievements and leadership in the field of ergonomics.

Faculty

Thomas J. Armstrong, Ph.D.
Professor, Dept. of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health
Professor, Dept. of Industrial and Operations Engineering, College of Engineering
University of Michigan

Thomas J. Armstrong holds a B.S.E. degree in Aerospace Engineering, a M.P.H. degree in Industrial Health, and a Ph.D. degree in Industrial Health, Physiology and Engineering, all from the University of Michigan. He is a professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering and is the director for the Center for Ergonomics at the University of Michigan. He is certified in Industrial Hygiene Comprehensive Practice.
Dr. Armstrong's research has resulted in numerous articles and chapters on upper limb biomechanics, carpal tunnel syndrome, tendinitis, job analysis, vibration, tools, work stations, and computer-aided design. He has conducted research and training within the automobile, aerospace, electronics, computer, office, and food processing industries.
Dr. Armstrong chairs the American National Standards Institute Z-365 committee on Cumulative Trauma Disorders, and is a member of the American Industrial Hygiene Association Ergonomics Committee and Editorial Board.

Bernard J. Martin, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Industrial and Operations Engineering
University of Michigan

Bernard Martin holds an Engineering degree, a Ph.D. in Neuroscience, and a Doctorat Es Science in Life Science from the Universite de Provence, Aix-Marsille I, France. He is an Associate Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan, where he teaches courses in Human Factors and Human Performance.
Dr. Martin is interested in human sensorimotor control systems and performs research in this area. He is particularly active in investigating the occupational aspects of vibration exposure and computer input device use. Areas of investigation include: 1) analysis of motor activities in repetitive tasks involving computer input devices or hand-tools; 2) motor coordination and muscle load pattern; 3) influence of floor characteristics on leg muscle fatigue and performance for both sport and work surfaces; 4) human-machine cooperative control, applications to wheel chairs and other vehicles; 5) quantification of visual fatigue; and 6) the influence of vibration variables on muscle fatigue.

Former Associate Director

Julian Faraway, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Bath, United Kingdom

Professor Faraway received a B.A. degree in Mathematics from Cambridge University in 1982 and Ph.D. degree in Statistics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1987.
Professor Faraway joined the faculty at the Department of Statistics at the University of Michigan in 1987. He specializes in Applied Statistics and in the areas of functional data analysis, nonparametric regression and multivariate data analysis. He has also worked in Statistical Genetics. He teaches a wide range of courses in Statistics.
He is an associate editor of Technometrics, the leading Statistics journal for the physical and engineering sciences. He has served as statistical consultant to many groups inside and outside the University of Michigan. 

Staff

Charles B. Woolley, M.S., CPE
Senior Research Associate Engineer, Center for Ergonomics
University of Michigan

Mr. Woolley received an M.S. degree in Bioengineering from the University of Michigan in 1980 and a B.S. degree in Applied Biology from Ferris State University in 1978. He is also a Certified Professional Ergonomist.
Mr. Woolley joined the staff of the Center for Ergonomics in 1981 as a research engineer. His primary function is research project support for faculty and graduate students. In this capacity he designs and constructs specialized instrumentation, equipment, and computer interfaces to monitor physical activity in the laboratory and workplace. He also performs field studies and has been responsible for computer data acquisition and analysis on many projects. Mr. Woolley teaches a graduate level laboratory course, Research Methods in Physical Ergonomics, and an undergraduate class, Instrumentation for Industrial Engineers.
As author of the Energy Expenditure Prediction Program and a developer of the Three Dimensional Static Strength Prediction Program, products sold by the University of Michigan, Mr. Woolley is very experienced with ergonomic software and job analysis in the workplace. He has consulted for many companies and other universities, designing and constructing equipment, performing ergonomic job analyses, and developing ergonomic software and job analysis training.

Alumni

Sungchan Bae, PhD
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering
University of Michigan

Sungchan Bae completed his PhD in the inter-departmental program of Mechanical Engineering and Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan. Sungchan received a B.S degree in Mechanical Engineering at Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) in 2003, and then earned a M.S degree also in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan in 2007. His research focused on biomechanical models of the upper extremity, especially hand grasping.

Monica Jones, PhD.
Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering
University of Michigan

Monica Jones completed her doctoral studies in Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan in 2012. Her research focused on the effects of bracing availability on force exertion and posture.  Monica received a B.S. degree from the University of Guelph in Biological Sciences in 1997. She also received a Master in Human Kinetics from the University of Windsor in Applied Human Performance in 2002.

Wei Zhou, PhD
Department of Biomedical Engineering
University of Michigan

Wei Zhou completed his dissertation in the Department of Biomedical Engineering in 2013. He received a B.E. degree in Mechanical Engineering (Safety Engineering) and a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Science and Technology of China in 2004. He also received his M.S. degree in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Connecticut in 2006. His research has focused on the biomechanics of grasping.



Emmanuel Bertrand, M.S.
Masters Student
Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of Michigan

Emmanuel received his B.S. degree from Ecole Polytechnique, France, in 2006. As an Assistant Research Fellow, Emmanuel worked at the Technische Universität in Vienna on tissue engineered bones. He joined the HUMOSIM project in 2007 and his research focus was human motion and obstacle avoidance. He received his M.S. degree in 2008 and has returned to France.

Su Bang Choe, Ph.D.
Statistical Analyst
Ford Credit

Dr. Su Bang Choe received his Ph.D from the Department of Statistics at the University of Michigan in 2006. His dissertation was "Statistical Analysis of Orientation Trajectories via Quaternions with Applications to Human Motion." He received a BSc in Actuarial Science and a Diploma in Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

Clark Dickerson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Kinesiology
University of Waterloo

Dr. Clark Dickerson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Waterloo, in Ontario, Canada. Dr. Dickerson's current research focuses on mathematical modeling of the shoulder mechanism, with an emphasis on ergonomics applications. Additionally, Dr. Dickerson is researching perception of muscular effort and improvements to biomechanical analyses available in ergonomics software tools. He completed his Michigan Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering (April 2005) under the co-supervision of Drs. Don Chaffin and Richard Hughes, for the dissertation titled "A Biomechanical Analysis of Shoulder Loading and Effort in Load Transfer Tasks".

Suzanne Hoffman, Ph.D.

Suzanne Hoffman received her Ph.D. from the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan in 2008. Her dissertation was titled "Whole Body Postures during Standing Hand Force Exertions Development of a 3D Biomechanical Posture Prediction Model." Suzanne earned a M.S.E. in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering at the University of Michigan before switching into the Industrial and Operations Engineering Ph.D. program. She received her B.S. degree from the University of Virginia in 2002 in Mechanical Engineering.

Heon Jeong Kim, Ph.D.
University of Michigan

Heon Jeong Kim received the Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2010. He received his B.S. degree in 1995 and M.S. degree in 1997, both in Mechanical Engineering from Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea. During his M.S, he studied the component mode synthesis for improved noise and vibration characteristics and worked on projects with Hyundai Motor Co. Ltd and the Agency of Defense Development by Korean Government . After receiving his M.S. degree, he worked as a research engineer for CAE (computer-aided engineering) and as an assistant manager for technology strategy in Samsung for 7 years. At Samsung he developed the design of an actuating mechanism by modeling and analysis of dynamic characteristics and planned technology strategies for micro actuators and intelligent robotics in their Central R&D Institute. Heon Jeong's research in HUMOSIM focused on biomechanical modeling of occupants with vibration exposure through collaboration with the U.S army. He is also interested in rehabilitation engineering for the disabled infant or elder.

K. Han Kim, Ph.D.
Assistant Research Scientist
Biosciences Group, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute

Kyunghan (Han) Kim received the Ph.D. degree in Industrial and Operations Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2005. His dissertation was "Modeling of Head and Hand Coordination in Un-Constrained Three-Dimensional Movements." Han continued as a post-doctoral fellow for one year in the HUMOSIM lab. He received B.A. degree in experimental psychology and M.A. degree in neuroscience, in the Department of Psychology, Seoul National University, where he studied the brain mechanism and the adaptive aspects of visual perception, oculomotor system, and head movements.

Becky Kirschweng, M.S.
Toyota

Becky Kirschweng received her M.S. degree in Industrial and Operations Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2008. She worked on several projects including plant studies, lab data collection, and data analysis. She also received her B.S. degree from the University of Michigan in 2006 in Industrial and Operations Engineering.


Woojin Park, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Seoul National University

Woojin Park received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in industrial engineering in 1995 and 1997, respectively, both from Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, South Korea. He received the Ph.D. degree in Industrial and Operations Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2003. His research interests include digital human modeling, human motion simulation, and computer-aided ergonomics and safety engineering.

Matt Parkinson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Engineering Design Program
College of Engineering
Pennsylvania State University

Matt Parkinson received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Brigham Young University, where his thesis focused on product development processes. He receivied his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 2005, where his dissertation title was "Seated Reaching Behavior". He is currently an Associate Professor at The Pennsylvania State University in the Engineering Design Program.

Kevin Rider, Ph.D.
Forensic Human Factors, LLC.

Dr. Kevin Rider received his Ph.D. from the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan in 2006. His dissertation was titled "Effects of Ride Motion Perturbation on the Speed and Accuracy of In-Vehicle Reaching Tasks." He received his B.S. degree in 1998 and M.S. degree in 2000, both in Industrial Engineering from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.

Divya Srinivasan, Ph.D.
Post Doc with Svend Erik Mathiassen
University of Gävle, Sweden

Divya Srinivasan received her Ph.D. from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2010. She received a Bachelors Degree in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from Anna University, India, and Masters Degrees in both Biomedical Engineering and Industrial Engineering from the University of Michigan. Her research focused on the developement of an upper-body coordination model for the integrated control of gaze and upper extremities in bi-manual object manipulations. 


David Wagner, Ph.D.
Apple Computer

David Wagner received his Ph.D. from the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan in 2008. His dissertation was titled "Classification and Modeling of Acyclic Stepping Strategies used during Manual Material Handling Transfer Tasks." His undergraduate degree is from UC Berkeley in Manufacturing Engineering.

Jing Wang, Ph.D.
Bank of America, Atlanta

Dr. Jing Wang received her Ph.D from the Department of Statistics at the University of Michigan in 2006. Her dissertation was "Statistical Modeling for 3-D Trajectories." She received her B.A. and M.A. degrees in Applied Mathematics from Shanghai JiaoTong University. She then earned her M.A. degree in Statistics from the University of Michigan. Her research focus was on functional data analysis and statistical modeling on 3-D trajectories.

Shin-Yuan Sean Yu, Ph.D.

Sean received his Ph.D. from the Department of Biomedical Engineereing at the University of Michigan in 2010. He previously received a B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from National Taiwan University. As an Assistant Research Fellow, Sean worked for the National Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering (NCREE) in Taiwan for four years in structral dynamics and vibration analysis. He joined the HUMOSIM project in 2007 and his research focused on human motion and coordination of body segments.

Xudong Zhang, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Orthopaedic Surgery and Biomedical Engineering
University of Pittsburgh


Xudong Zhang was the first Ph.D. graduate of the HUMOSIM project. His research interests are biomechanical modeling; human motion analysis, modeling, and simulation; human performance strategy modeling and visualization; computer-aided design and analysis of human-machine systems; large-scale and/or dynamic performance data characterization; rehabilitation engineering; and robotics.