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  • Use Private Browsing To Access Multiple Accounts Often times I find I'm sitting at a users computer, and I need to access my Webmail, or I'm at my own computer and I'm working with ...
    Posted Mar 8, 2016, 8:11 AM by Duane Martin
  • Top iOS Remote Desktop Applications For the average home user:Application with very little technical knowhow required.  TeamViewer - [Free, iPhone / iPad] Visit http://teamviewer.com to create an account, and install the desktop software on ...
    Posted Mar 8, 2016, 8:10 AM by Duane Martin
  • Free, Simple Tips to Prevent Malware Attacks WHAT TO LOOK FOR: Malware like the CryptoLocker use a trick where they hide a malicious file inside of a .ZIP attachment.  They name the malicious file filename.pdf.exe ...
    Posted Mar 2, 2015, 10:11 AM by Duane Martin
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Use Private Browsing To Access Multiple Accounts

posted Mar 8, 2016, 8:11 AM by Duane Martin

Often times I find I'm sitting at a users computer, and I need to access my Webmail, or I'm at my own computer and I'm working with someone over the phone and I need to log onto their internet account, to troubleshoot an issue.  I don't want to log the user out of their account or fill up my comptuer with saved logins for other people.

All modern browsers have a Private browsing option.  Open a new Private window and log onto the desired account, then when your finished simply close the window and no trace of the account login is left on the system, plus when you return to the normal browser session all previously saved login credentials remain unchanged. 

  • MAC

    • Safari

      • Select Private Browsing from the Safari menu
      • Uncheck Private Browsing from the Safari Menu or Quit Safari to end the private session

Firefox

• Select New Private Window from the File menu
• Close the Private Window to end the session

    • Chrome

• Select New Incognito Window from the File menu
• Close the Incognito Window to end the session

  • PC

Internet Explorer

• Click the Gear icon in the top right corner
• Select the Safety menu
• Select InPrivate Browsing
• Close the InPrivate window to end the session

Firefox

• Click the Firefox dropdown menu in the top left corner
• Select New Private Window
• Close the Private Window to end the session

    • Chrome

• Click the menu icon in the top right corner
• Select New incognito window from the dropdown
• Close the Incognito window to end the session

There are several other instances where this trick can come in handy, some examples include:

You can use a private window to log onto a second account on any site (i.e. Facebook, Twitter, forums)

You can log onto your own Social website account without logging out your other family or friends on a shared computer

You can do an internet search for that 'perfect gift', without anyone being able to find what you were searching for in the browser history

Top iOS Remote Desktop Applications

posted Mar 8, 2016, 8:10 AM by Duane Martin

For the average home user:
Application with very little technical knowhow required.  

TeamViewer - [Free, iPhone / iPad] Visit http://teamviewer.com to create an account, and install the desktop software on the computer that you want to access remotely.  Then log into your account either at teamviewer.com or on one of the mobile apps to access your computer.

For family help desk:
This is the perfect solution for anyone who has ever gotten that call from a friend or family member who is asking for technical help with a particular website or program.  You know how much time is consumed with "What exactly does the page say?" and "Did you click or right-click the icon?".  

Join.me - [Free, Universal] Join.me does all the work, simply tell your caller to open a web browser and visit http://join.me.  Then have them click the Start Meeting button and install a small (one-time) plug in.  The user then gets a little box at the top of their screen with a unique number.  Now all you have to do is open the Join.me app and have them read you the number.  Once you enter it you'll see their desktop on your iPad.  You can also use the functions to request control of the users computer.

For power users:
This is the place where you already know how to setup your own Remote Desktop server and you want a true Windows experience on your iPad or iPhone.  These are also the best applications for Windows users who just want to leave the laptop behind and just travel with the iPad.  NOTE: these work best if you are on a static IP network or when used with a service like http://no-ip.com, also I recommend setting up a custom RDP Port for better security.

PocketCloud - [Free, Universal] or [Pro, $14.99 Universal] This is the best Free RD client that I've used. However, you must used the paid version if you want to keep more then one saved configuation. PocketCloud offers the same quick setup with the install of an app on the server as Logmein and TeamView mentioned above, but you can also manually configure your connections, which makes for a more responsive experience.

Jump Desktop - [$14.99, Universal] This is my #1 go to app for Remote Desktop and VNC.  You can save all your sessions for quick one touch access.  You have full Multi-Touch/Gesture support on Windows 8 and 8.1.  Connect to Mac native Screen Share via VNC.  Most importantly the interface is clean and fast and the mouse guide is perfect for accurate clicking.

For corporate folk:
These apps offer some special features that are more useful to business networks.

Microsoft Remote Desktop - [Free, Universal] The new kid though it only supports RDP (not VNC) does work very well, and it's built in support for multi-touch gestures with Windows 8-8.1, the interface is very clunky to say the least when using with Windows server or Windows 7, Vista, XP.  That being said, 1) the app is Free, and 2) you can keep many saved profiles, but most importantly 3) it's the only RD client that supports Remote Apps/Resources.  Sadly, you can only save settings for one remote resources server at a time, and only Windows Server 2008 R2 or Windows Server 2012 currenly support Remote Apps via TS Web Access.

Remotix - [Free, Universal] or [$19.99, Universal] One of the more expensive options, (the free version limits your sessions to only a few minutes and then it goes crazy) Remotix offers a great feature where it will automatically scan your network and find available Remote servers that it can connect to.  Remotix also offers the highest quality connectivitiy to Macs via the native Screen Share protocol.

Free, Simple Tips to Prevent Malware Attacks

posted Nov 12, 2014, 11:41 AM by Duane Martin   [ updated Mar 2, 2015, 10:11 AM ]

WHAT TO LOOK FOR: Malware like the CryptoLocker use a trick where they hide a malicious file inside of a .ZIP attachment.  They name the malicious file filename.pdf.exe.  By default Windows hides the actual extension so the file looks like filename.pdf and they add an official looking PDF icon to the file so you will open it without realizing.  The trick has also been used to look like JPG, DOCX, etc.  I would suggest that you approach every email with caution and if anything has even a hint of suspicion, contact the sender to confirm it's legitimacy before clicking any links or attachments.  Also, remember, email attachments aren't the only way to get a virus on your computer.  They could come from phony links on Facebook, Twitter, etc. or from searching the internet and clicking on a fake website which tricks you into clicking an authorization link, or from installing unauthorized software, or from an infected usb drive or other shared storage location, just to name a few.

WHAT CAN YOU DO:

Tip: Make sure your most important files are regularly backed up.  Preferably either on some cloud storage or external USB device that is not left connected to your computer except during the backup process.

Tip:  Use the http://mywot.com plugin in all your web browsers.  Web of Trust (WOT) is a community driven voting system that helps protect you when searching the internet by flagging and blocking known bad and malicious websites.

Tip: If you get an email that has an attachment, and you question the message even slightly, before you open it, contact the sender to confirm it's legitimacy, or upload the attachment to https://www.virustotal.com/ and they'll thoroughly scan the file for any know threats using 47 top malware scanners.

Tip: If you get an email or a tweet, etc. with a link that you're unsure of, copy/paste it to http://www.unc.nu/  The site will decode the url and show you were it actually points to, as well as a thumbnail and some details about the threat level of the destination.

Windows User Tip:  If you disable the Hide extensions for known file types feature, you will be able to quickly tell if the file is really what it claims to be or if it's actually an exe, zip, com, etc.

Tip: Always make sure you keep your software up to date.  Most importantly, your Anti-Virus software, Mac/Windows OS updates, MS Office, Java, and Adobe Acrobat & Flash.  Whenever they prompt you to complete updates, you should plan to take care of it sooner, rather then later.  NOTE:  unfortunately, the Adobe and Java updates still try to install other third party 'bloatware' when you update them.  So be prepared to un-check the option to include these 'free' extras.

Thanks for reading if you have a comment or additional tip you would like to add please leave comment below.

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