Workshops & PresenterS

KEYNOTE SPEAKER - Dr. Dan Longboat

The keynote speaker will present on September 26 at 1pm ET/12 pm CT

Dr. Dan Longboat - Roronhiakewen (He Clears the Sky) - is a Turtle Clan member of the Mohawk Nation and a citizen of the Rotinonshón:ni (Haudenosaunee - People of the Longhouse), originally from Ohsweken - the Six Nations community on the Grand River. He is currently on leave from Trent University where he is an Associate Professor in the Chanie Wenjack School for Indigenous Studies and Acting Director of the newly formed Indigenous Environmental Institute. Dan was also the founding director of the Indigenous Environmental Science/Studies Program. Dan has also taught at several other post-secondary institutions in Ontario.

Dan’s Ph.D. is in Environmental Studies at York University with his dissertation (The Haudenosaunee Archipelago: The Nature of Bio-Cultural Restoration and Revitalization) receiving the York Award of Excellence in Scholarship in 2009. While speaking on Indigenous issues across Turtle Island, he stresses the importance of learning from Elders and Knowledge Holders as the critical foundation for Indigenous identity, vision and life purposes.

Cultural Humility Session - Saturday, September 25, 10:30 am ET / 9:30 am CT

Tia Kennedy is an Indigenous advocate and leader in her community. From Oneida Nation of the Thames, born just outside of Walpole Island First Nation she carries both Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee Teachings. Tia has worked with various First Nations communities and non-indigenous organizations across Turtle Island to create more equitable relationships. Her work is focused on a community-based and a heart-centered approach to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Tia believes everyone has unique gifts to apply for happier and more fulfilling lifestyles. Tia uses the two-eyed seeing approach of applying both the Indigenous and Western lenses to build harmonious relationships.

SATURDAY, September 25 - Block 1

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm (ET) / 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm (CT)

Ontario's Native Plants

Join Adjowa to learn about some of the native plant species of Ontario, including how to identify them and resources to use. Participants will also learn about medicinal properties of the plants as well as a concluding segment of food security and the importance of it in the times that we are living in. This workshop will be interactive, with guided discussion questions incorporated throughout.

Adjowa Karikari is the Farm Education Coordinator at Black Creek Community Farm. She enjoys long hikes, foraging, mushrooms, and exploring many different types of forests, flora, fauna, and fungi! They believe that education is one of the most powerful things in the world, and everyone needs to be food secure in this day and age. She loves to connect with like-minded youth because change can only happen through community so we must always continue to build that and to grow and grow!

Black Creek Community Farm is situated on a truly unique eight-acre property that includes pristine farmland, a heritage farmhouse and barn, and surrounding forest that extends down into the Black Creek ravine in the City of Toronto. Their mission is to serve and enrich their community through a thriving farm, healthy food, hands-on training and learning experiences, and to inspire the next generation by providing leadership in food justice and supporting diverse natural and social ecosystems.

Visit their website: blackcreekfarm.ca or follow them on Instagram @blackcreekcommunityfarm

Invasive Species

Have you ever heard of invasive alien species such as purple loosestrife, zebra mussels, or the LDD moth? Do you know what they are and why they can be so difficult to manage? Come and learn about some Indigenous perspectives on invasive species and how to deal with them.

Gary Pritchard is a Conservation Ecologist and Indigenous Engagement Specialist from Curve Lake First Nation and brings over 20 years of environmental experience. He has worked with and travelled to over 280 Indigenous communities throughout Canada and the United States. He has extensive knowledge of conducting environmental assessments, implementing environmental policy, project planning and permitting while working in conjunction with a variety of multi-disciplinary sectors. He has successfully collaborated with many stakeholder groups, researchers, institutes, government agencies and First Nation communities and political organizations to address environmental concerns and identify practical solutions to environmental related issues. Gary also serves as a technical advisor and past professor at two post-secondary institutes within Ontario.

Emily Morris has recently graduated from the environmental science program at the University of Ottawa, and spent this past summer working with Plenty Canada as an invasive species technician through the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters’ Invading Species Awareness Program. This fall, she joined Plenty Canada as an Environmental Stewardship Coordinator.

Environmental Policy

Join Dr. Anne Bell and Jackie Ho at Ontario Nature for a workshop on the basics of environmental policy. This interactive session will touch on major highlights in legislation, a day in the life of a policy expert, and how policy intersects with environmental justice. Get tips for how you can take action and get involved in policy in your local area.

Dr. Anne Bell has been Ontario Nature’s Director of Conservation and Education since 2007. She holds a Ph.D. in environmental studies and has over 20 years of experience working as an environmental educator, researcher and advocate for government and non-profit organizations. Anne loves to go birding, camping, swimming, skiing and playing hockey.

Jackie Ho started with Ontario Nature in 2012 as a member of the Youth Council and rejoined in 2020 in her role as Protected Places Assistant. She graduated in 2019 with a B.A. in integrative biology from Harvard College, where she divided her time between tree-ring research and recruiting students into conservation work. She has previously worked on several conservation initiatives abroad, from teaching in Uganda to mangrove restoration in Suriname, and has volunteered with the Toronto Zoo and Toronto Wildlife Centre.

Traditional Medicine

Description coming soon!

Beedahbin Peltier is an Indigenization Consultant at Indigenize.ca

Grew up in Manidoo Minis/Manitoulin Island, I now live in Nogojiwanong, Mississauga territory. Raised by my grandparents who spoke anishinaabemowin language and who practice a traditional lifestyle. Our family is the deer and turtle clan, whose responsibility is to critically think, challenge, seek understanding through philosophy and science, and to share those understandings. In Wiikwemkoong, it has become known as a cultural and language hub of the Anishinaabe nation. My family and community continue to support my participation in knowledge revitalization and my passion for sharing Anishinaabe kendaasiwin. I am on the TRent Aboriginal Cultural Knowledge and Science (TRACK) TRACKS advisory circle, as well, I am a corporate Indigenization consultant at Indigenize.ca, a professor at Fleming College, a course instructor at the First Nations University of Canada and I am a father, husband, son, brother, and uncle.

I love plants, the lands, the waters, and all that anishinaabemowin lends to describing all the seen and unseen intricacies of the web of creation. Our ancestors, our knowledge holders and our youth continue to have access to Anishinaabe kendaasiwin, akinoomoshin, and eskaagimikwe. Anishinaabe knowledge, we consider to be a living knowledge, from a living place, a living people, and it is a responsibility to support the ability that Anishinaabe knowledge has in wellness, identity, relationships, and visions of the future. Miigwech, Miigwech, Miigwech, Miigwech!!

SATURDAY, September 25 - Block 2

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm (ET) / 2:30 pm - 4 pm (CT)

What's the Buzz About Bees?

Join Prof. Sheila Colla in a discussion about native bees and other pollinators. You will learn about their diversity and ecological needs as well as what the key threats are to their populations. We will then brainstorm together the ways we can best help support these native critters and the critical ecosystem services they provide.

Prof. Sheila Colla is a classically trained Ecologist using scientific principles to address real-world conservation issues. Their research thus far has focused on the conservation of lesser understood native species such as bees, butterflies and flowering plants. As pollinators and pollination have become important issues among policymakers and the public in recent years, Dr. Colla's work has become more interdisciplinary. They work closely with environmental NGOs, landowners, academic partners and government agencies at the municipal, provincial and federal levels to implement conservation management based on the best available science. My research considers species with large ranges across the US and Canada but also local species which are at-risk here in Ontario.

Visit savethebumblebees.ca

Be the Change: Wisdom for Young Changemakers

Looking at the planet in its current state, it can be easy to become overwhelmed and feel like you can't make a meaningful difference in the world. The reality is, each of us has an almost limitless potential to make a positive impact, you just need to know where to put your attention! In this workshop, Kale will lead you through a series of fun games, thought provoking group discussions and insightful bits of wisdom ensuring that you receive everything you will need to affect change in your world..

You will need a pen and paper OR whiteboard and marker.

Kale Black is an inspiring, honest, funny and enthusiastic speaker with a passion for helping others realize their place in the world. With 13 years of experience in the environmental sector, combined with his experience as a meditation facilitator and in the field of holistic health, he understands the connection between healthy humans & a healthy planet. The stories from years of experience working with youth who share his passion for the Earth are sure to benefit budding environmentalists beginning their journey.

Follow him at @kaleblack27 on Instagram!

Traditional Beading

For this workshop, participants will create a beaded pin for Orange Shirt Day. Through traditional beading, participants will be invited to learn some basic techniques, patience, and perseverance. This is a beginner level workshop.

Materials for this kit will be sent to all participants ahead of the summit.

Jaida Ponce is a Kichi Siibi Anishinabe- Kwe from Ardoch Algonquin First Nation. This past year Jaida has worked at TRACKS in the Oshkwazin team in the Development and Delivery position and this summer in the TRACKS Oshkwazin Summer Youth Supervisor position. Jaida has also been teaching beading to organizations as a facilitator independently for a long time. While working for TRACKS she has taught many youth various beading projects. As a learning and growing person Jaida looks forward to teaching and growing in her skills as a beader and facilitator.

Maggie Cummings ndizhnikaaz. Ngig ndodem. Wshkiigomaang ndoonjibaa.

Maggie Cummings is an Anishnaabekwe, Otter clan, from Wshkiigomaang (Curve Lake First Nation). Maggie Cummings is the Interim TRACKS Co-director, Oshkwazin. She is in charge of the Oshkwazin Youth Leadership development program, TRACKS' newest initiative providing leadership opportunities to high-school aged Indigenous youth.She completed her B.A. in Linguistics, with a minor in First Nations and Indigenous Studies, at the University of British Columbia. Maggie is passionate about Anishinaabemowin (the Ojibwe language), language revitalization movements, and uplifting youth voices. Youth are our future and Maggie is excited to help empower them on their journey in the physical world.

#RisingYouth Grant Writing - Helping Youth Thrive

TakingITGlobal is looking for young people who are inspired and ready to take action in their local community through the #RisingYouth Community Service Grants program. #RisingYouth empowers young people, ages 15-30 to imagine ideas that can support their local community and helps them put their ideas into action through grants of $250, $750, or $1500.

If this sounds like you, Kayla and Michael will tell you a bit more about Rising Youth. They will be highlighting some past projects and let you know how you can get involved. They will help generate some ideas and walk you through the grant writing process.

Michael Solomon's role at TakingItGlobal involves serving Connected North partner school communities as well as involving Indigenous youth throughout Turtle Island in leading projects supported by the Rising Youth Community Service Fund. He also loves to travel and has visited Peru, Netherlands, France, Belgium and Germany. In his spare time, Michael enjoys boxing, hockey, lacrosse and other sports.

Kayla Rosteski-Merasty is of Cree and Métis ancestry. She is from Pinehouse Lake, a village located in northern Saskatchewan but currently resides on Treaty 6 in Saskatoon. Kayla holds a degree in education through the Indian Teacher Education Program at the University of Saskatchewan. When she completed her degree she took a position with TakingITGlobal within the Connected North program. Through this work she has made relationality a core facet as she is a loving mother of two children. Kayla has been asked to lead various projects and speak on numerous panels that address both support in post secondary and also support in daily life as a young Indigenous woman. She has now taken a position within #RisingYouth team to ensure youth have an opportunity to create positive change within our national community!

Canada Service Corps (CSC), is an initiative funded by the Government of Canada (ESDC), since 2018 and provides youth the opportunity to be engaged and involved in their communities in a variety of ways. A selection of national organizations along with regional organizations across the country are offering innovative and inspiring projects for youth and young adults based on different themes; like climate and environment, or building democracy. The purpose is to give young people the chance to gain experience and build their skills for future opportunities.

Through micro-grants, known as #RisingYouth Community Service Grants, TakingITGlobal and our frontline team have been able to engage young people across the country who are inspired and ready to take action in their local community with funding to lead their own service project.

SUNDAY, September 26 - Block 3

10:00 am - 11:30 am (ET) / 9:00 am -10:30 am (CT)

Two-Eyed Seeing

How can the best of both Indigenous Knowledge and Western Science be applied to help meet the challenges of today? Elder Larry McDermott and Dr. Dan Longboat will share their experiences and perspectives on this important work.

Elder Larry McDermott is a member of the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation, and is the Executive Director of Plenty Canada, an Indigenous-led ENGO that recognizes that people are part of the environment and we sustain healthy lives only when the environment as a whole is healthy. One of our main areas of focus is that of Indigenous food sovereignty, at both the global and domestic level. For more information, visit www.plentycanada.com

Dr. Dan Longboat - Roronhiakewen (He Clears the Sky) - is a Turtle Clan member of the Mohawk Nation and a citizen of the Rotinonshón:ni (Haudenosaunee - People of the Longhouse), originally from Ohsweken - the Six Nations community on the Grand River. He is currently on leave from Trent University where he is an Associate Professor in the Chanie Wenjack School for Indigenous Studies and Acting Director of the newly formed Indigenous Environmental Institute. Dan was also the founding director of the Indigenous Environmental Science/Studies Program. Dan has also taught at several other post-secondary institutions in Ontario.

Dan’s Ph.D. is in Environmental Studies at York University with his dissertation (The Haudenosaunee Archipelago: The Nature of Bio-Cultural Restoration and Revitalization) receiving the York Award of Excellence in Scholarship in 2009. While speaking on Indigenous issues across Turtle Island, he stresses the importance of learning from Elders and Knowledge Holders as the critical foundation for Indigenous identity, vision and life purposes.

Languages - Anishinaabemdaa! Lets speak Anishinaabemowin!

Join Martina Albert in an open community circle or “campfire conversation” about Indigenous languages of Turtle Island (North America). Together, we will explore the many Indigenous languages of the first peoples of Canada and share our own Native languages with one another. You will have the opportunity to learn Anishinaabemowin phases and the powerful meaning behind the sounding of syllables.

Martina Albert Anishinaabekwewi, Martina diziinikaaz, Deshkan Ziibiing doonjibaa, ajiijaak doodem, mii anokiiwikwe(g) Plenty Canada (Martina Albert is a proud Anishinaabe woman with the English name Martina, she is from Chippewas of the Thames First Nation, she is crane clan and she is a working woman with Plenty Canada as the Reconciliation, Tree Planting and Carbon Offsetting Intern). Martina is currently completing her B.Sc at Trent University in Environmental and Resource Sciences as an undergraduate transfer student from Fleming College’s Ecosystem Management Technology program, where she graduated with an Indigenous Perspectives Distinction. She has contributed to conservation efforts and research in South Africa and Costa Rica, working with small underdeveloped communities who are disproportionately affected by climate change and global conservation crises. She works for her community Chippewas of the Thames First Nation in the Treaties, Lands and Environment Department during the summer months between school, contributing to source water protection, waste management programs, Species at Risk monitoring, community education and engagement, and more. Her hobbies and interests include sewing, painting, hiking, camping, and longboarding.

How to Be An Ally with Indigenous Peoples

To begin the pathway to reconciliation, we must understand the fully understand truth. We must practice deep listening to restore relationships that are based on peace, friendship, and trust. When we recognize indigenous people’s history with Canada, we can recognize their resiliency and love for the land. An Indigenous worldview shifts the way we interpret our connection to Mother Earth. Through learning and healing ourselves and each other, we are healing bloodshed embedded in the earth’s surface. It is when the full truth is uncovered, we can begin healing and celebrating in unity as caretakers of earth, together.

A notebook and pen/pencil is recommended for this workshop.

See Tia Kennedy's bio above, under Cultural Humility Session

OPTIONAL Discussions

Saturday, September 25, 6 pm - 7 pm ET; 5 pm - 6 pm CT

Writing in Nature

Led by mentor, Nathaniel Rose, share your Writing in Nature piece in this showcase!

Writing in Nature challenge description can be found here.

Art in Nature and Sustainability

Led by mentor, Janae Grafham, share your Art in Nature piece in this showcase and also talk about sustainability!

Art in Nature challenge description can be found here.

DIY a sustainable item challenge description can be found here.


Careers/Networking in Environment

Led by mentor, Gillian Johnson, and youth leader, Kylee Smith, join this session to hear about networking in environment and hearing from others on their experiences!

Dealing with Eco-Anxiety

Led by youth leader, Haidi Wu, a dedicated member of the Ontario Nature Youth Council, and community environmental activist. Discuss ways of coping with eco-anxiety and understanding that you are not alone in your activism efforts.

Sunday, September 26, 11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET; 10:30 am - 11:30 am CT

Bringing on Biodiversity

Join Haidi Wu and Kaitlyn Root, dedicated members of Ontario Nature's Youth Council, to learn about Ontario Nature's biodiversity campaign. Learn tips and tricks on how to plan and execute the campaign in your home community from these young eco-leaders. Hear from biodiversity ambassadors on the work they are doing in their community and how you can get involved. It's time to bring on biodiversity!

Climate Action

Join youth leader Ceci La Rose for a discussion on climate action. Hear from your fellow Summitters on how to get involved, what they have been doing in their communities, and best ways to support each other in the climate movement.

Medicine Bag Showcase

Join mentors Elaina Cox and Martina Albert

Careers/Networking in Environment

Led by mentor, Gillian Johnson, and youth leader, Kylee Smith, join this session to hear about networking in environment and hearing from others on their experiences!

Personal Projects Showcase

Have a project you are working on and want to get the word out to your fellow Summiters? Join this space, facilitated by youth leader, Derek Nguyen, to share a 5 minute presentation on the work/projects you are running in your own community and to get the word out there!