Winding Path Tendai Buddhist Sangha

News & Events

Winding Path Tendai Buddhist Sangha is a meditation group that has been supporting each other in mindfulness and Buddhist practices in the heart of Springfield, MA since 2011. We meet every Thursday at 6:30 PM in the San Mateo room of Christ Church Cathedral. The evening starts with a 30 minute lesson/discussion led by Shingaku. After the discussion, we perform the Daily Service before engaging in two 20 minute meditation periods.

THIS WEEK: Thursday, March 23, 2017

Buddhism and Addiction

Buddhist teachings and practices provide a framework that help us understand the root of our suffering and how to transform the way we experience our lives. The second noble truth identifies craving and aversion, which can give rise to addiction, as one cause of suffering. The eightfold path offers a way to live life so that craving and aversion don’t control your actions. In this evening’s discussion we will focus on Noah Levine’s Refuge Recovery, an interpretation of Buddhist teachings specifically supporting those who are recovering from various forms of substance or process addiction. The teachings that are part of Refuge Recovery can be useful for anyone who experiences craving or aversion.

At the end of this evening’s conversation, we will explore whether a group is interested in starting up a weekly Refuge Recovery meeting in Springfield


Thursday, March 30, 2017

Unfailing Mutual Kindness

We’ve been reading A Guide to the Buddhist Path by Sangharakshita. This evening we will be discussing “Unfailing Mutual Kindness,” pages 123-125, the final piece in the section on Sangha. Please come ready to share a few sentences from the text. Consider these angles when you identify what part of the text you want to share: What’s an idea you agree with? An idea you argue with? An idea you aspire to?

If you don’t have the book, no problem. You’re still welcome to join the discussion.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Buddhism and Addiction

Buddhist teachings and practices provide a framework that help us understand the root of our suffering and how to transform the way we experience our lives. The second noble truth identifies craving and aversion, which can give rise to addiction, as one cause of suffering. The eightfold path offers a way to live life so that craving and aversion don’t control your actions. In this evening’s discussion we will focus on Noah Levine’s Refuge Recovery, an interpretation of Buddhist teachings specifically supporting those who are recovering from various forms of substance or process addiction. The teachings that are part of Refuge Recovery can be useful for anyone who experiences craving or aversion.

At the end of this evening’s conversation, we will explore whether a group is interested in starting up a weekly Refuge Recovery meeting in Springfield

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Unfair

A Buddhist reading of Adam Benforado’s book Unfair: the New Science of Criminal Injustice. We will delve into the challenges Benforado identifies in the criminal justice system and consider those challenges through the lens of Buddhist teachings. We looked at one chapter from this text together a couple years ago. This evening will outline the book’s primary claims and then analyze those claims through the lens of dharma.


Thursday, March 9, 2017

Back to the Breath

Over a series of weeks we will be discussing and engaging in practices from the Anapanasati Sutta or the Sutra on Awareness of Breathing. We will explore the content of this sutra as a tool for living more deeply in the moment and for developing wisdom about the nature of existence.

As we’re studying the sutra, check out this interpretation by the Hoodie Monks, a group of Buddhist Monks, MC's, DJs, B-Boys and Street Artists dedicated to sharing Buddhist thought and practice through hip hop culture.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Beginner’s Mind Night--Right Livelihood

The first Thursday of each month is beginner’s mind night in our sangha. The evening’s discussion has two purposes. For those who are attending for this first time, we will introduce ourselves and explain some of the basic practices and teachings of Tendai Buddhism. This is a great chance to orient yourself to our group and to our particular style of meditation. For those who are regular attendees of our services, beginner’s mind night is a chance to reflect on how we are living mindfully in daily life. Each month we will review one of Thich Nhat Hanh’s Fourteen Mindfulness Trainings as a way to consider our daily practice. This month we will focus on Right Livelihood.

All are welcome to join us. No need to register in advance. There is no fee for attendance, but we recommend a free-will donation as a way to practice generosity.