Reviews

"All hail … Macduff? That was certainly the buzz last night after Eric Barry’s extraordinary performance of the aria “Ah, la paterna mano”: Barry takes his solo moment — as the stunned Macduff learns that the other Macker has slaughtered his entire family — and makes the strongest possible case for this operatic treatment of Shakespeare’s play. For an instant, time stands still while Verdi — and Barry — mine the supernatural plot for its all-too-human consequences: a recognition of shame, and rage, and, above all, sorrow for the lives discarded in the wake of vaulting ambition. It’s an amazing rendition, and the crowd at the Tobin Center roared its approval." -San Antonio Current (Macbeth, Opera San Antonio)

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"Among the other characters, tenor Eric Barry as Macduff scored big with the audience of about 1,400 people with his aria announcing the murders of his character’s wife and children." -San Antonio Express News (Macbeth, Opera San Antonio)

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"In Sunday’s performance, tenor Eric Barry conveyed Nemorino’s ardor and pure-hearted sincerity so vividly, you could hardly begrudge him spending his last lira on a sham draft of desire." -Boston Globe News (L'elisir d'amore, Boston Midsummer Opera)

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“Eric Barry’s sound lives just above his hard palate, gliding over a tensionless neck, and soars through his range with the smallest of effort.” -Boston Musical Intelligencer (The Bartered Bride, Boston Midsummer Opera)

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“Barry’s warm, lyrical tenor easily encompasses Rodolfo’s impassioned outbursts, his youthful voice clearly heard…” -News Observer (La bohème, North Carolina Opera)

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"Spanish-American tenor Eric Barry, who repeatedly brought down the house with his ardent portrayal of Lyonel, soared above the orchestra with a fine, well-focused tone and impeccable diction." -Boston Musical Intelligencer (Martha, Boston Midsummer Opera)

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"Wolf Trap Opera Company hit one of its highest peaks of the past decade with a bracing production of The Rake's Progress that featured an appealing cast, well up to the challenges of Stravinsky's prismatic score, and incisive, tightly meshed direction and design. Through it all, the heart beneath the opera's satire beat distinctly.

On August 5 at the Barns at Wolf Trap, Eric Barry left an impressive mark in the title role with a bright, clear timbre, evenness of projection and exceptional sensitivity to subtleties of text and melodic contour. The tenor proved to be a persuasive actor as well, conveying Tom's moral and mental descent with considerable skill and, in the final scene, producing sweet, subtle singing that proved quite affecting." -Opera News (The Rake's Progress, Wolf Trap Opera)

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As her unfortunate lover, Edgardo, tenor Eric Barry was at his best in the final scene. He was heartbroken, but refrained from sobbing all over the place as so often happens. He has a fine lightish lyric tenor voice that is capable of ringing high notes and that doesn't bottom out in the lower parts." - TheaterJones (Lucia di Lammermoor, Amarillo Opera)

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-“The summer’s best vocal talent was saved for this welcome production of “The Rake’s Progress,” on Friday night at the Barns. ­Texas-born tenor Eric Barry excelled in the demanding role of Tom Rakewell, in one of the most promising performances by a Wolf Trap young artist in recent memory. Lustrous, puissant high notes never faltered or strained, with clean accuracy of intonation and rhythm, spinning out the baroquified curlicues of Stravinsky’s vocal writing.” –Washington Post (The Rake’s Progress, Wolf Trap Opera)

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“Eric Barry does impressive work as Tom Rakewell, the young man who deserts his true love -- she's not named Anne Trulove for nothing -- after being lured to the big, wicked city of London by the demonic Nick Shadow.

With his boyish face, Barry captures the naive side of Tom particularly well, and he's adept, too, at conveying the decline into debauchery. The final scene, after Tom has been turned mentally unbalanced thanks to Shadow's parting shot, finds Barry especially affecting.

The timbre of the tenor's voice doesn't reveal the conventional operatic heft, but it's solid from top to bottom. And Barry used his vocal resources with admirable nuance and a touch of sweetness. His diction is exemplary, too, no small matter when dealing with such highly poetic English.” –Baltimore Sun (The Rake’s Progress, Wolf Trap Opera)

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“As the sincere but bumbling Florindo, tenor Eric Barry was likewise a revelation. His instrument appears already to be well on its way toward becoming a notably big romantic tenor voice. Yet once again, his lyric skills, not to mention his stage presence, were easily adjusted to the more nuanced realms of lyric opera. Heʼs a talent to be watched.” -Washington Times (Le donne curiose, Wolf Trap Opera)

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“As Florindo, Eric Barry sounded like a very promising tenor, with a good deal of sweetness and vibrancy already in his timbre and an elegant sense of style in his phrasing.” -Opera News (Wolf-Ferrari’s Le donne curiose, Wolf Trap Opera)

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“Tenor Eric Barry dispatched a confident voice of clarion delivery. The vocal color was bright and pleasingly well focused.” -Examiner.com(Mozart’s Requiem, Washington National Cathedral)

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“Tenor Eric Barry was impressive. His vocal placement allowed him to shade the mystical nature of the music and his attention to the chromatic inflections of the lines was engaging.” -Hartford Courant (Vaughan-Williams’ Hodie, Hartford Symphony)

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“Barry gave a fine depiction of Donna Anna's suitor, particularly impressive in his agile performance of the florid aria "Il mio tesoro." -Opera News (Don Giovanni, Yale Opera)

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“As the young sailor Anthony, tenor Eric Barry delivers one of the evening’s musical highlights, a beautifully lyrical rendition of the Act I ballad ‘Johanna.’” -Maryland Theater Review (Sweeney Todd, Wolf Trap Opera)

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“As Anthony, the young sailor who falls in love with her, Eric Barry showed the kind of straightforward, honest singing that best serves these particular ingenue parts.” -Washington Post (Sweeney Todd, Wolf Trap Opera)

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“In the smaller role of the well-meaning but rather hapless young Anthony, Sweeney’s shipboard friend and the unlikely suitor of the barber’s daughter, Johanna, tenor Eric Barry made the most of each moment, bolstering his character with his winsome yet surprisingly powerful instrument. Here is a young singer who could clearly develop into a major tenor presence in a few more years as his skill set grows and develops. His career will be interesting to watch.” -Washington Times (Sweeney Todd, Wolf Trap Opera)

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“…and tenor Eric Barry’s Florindo succumbs to her entreaties with a vocal ease that never sounded strained.” -Washington Post (Le donne curiose, Wolf Trap Opera)