In Order We Trust

Secular Library


The Secular Library is dedicated to the establishment of Science, the exercise of Reason, the pursuit of Truth, the understanding of Reality, and the better evolution of Mankind, through the prudent justification of knowledge classification.

Dictionaries and encyclopedias organize words and subjects of knowledge in alphabetical order, but the alphabetical order does not present the categories of subjects in a manner that helps the student comprehend the demarcation of knowledge. Library classification systems are examples of categorizing the subjects of knowledge into related sections. The systems are a table of contents beginning with the most general categories, and subsequently introducing the more specific subjects in a descending hierarchy.

In 1873, Melvil Dewey commenced the field of library science at Amherst College with the development and publication of the classification system that is named in his honor.

Dewey Decimal System (DDC)

organizes the general subjects of knowledge along the lines of the traditional school curriculum and is dedicated to a ten point subdivision system, but the two systems do not coordinate correctly. Some library science scholars have opined dissatisfaction with the DDC, but they are unable to design a better system. The DDC provided an enhancement for learning for a few decades, only because it was better than the previous unformulated systems that tended to be based on the libraries' acquisition dates of their books. A new book came in and the librarians would just add it to the open end of the shelf - there was no demarcation of subject areas.

000 – Computer science & general references

100 – Philosophy & psychology

200 – Religion

300 – Social sciences

400 – Language

500 – Pure Science

600 – Technology

700 – Arts & recreation

800 – Literature

900 – History & geography

The Library of Congress Classification system was developed by Herbert Putnam in 1897. It is used by most research and academic libraries in the United States.

Library of Congress (LCC)

supposedly organizes the subjects of knowledge to assist the members of the federal government.The LCC was generated immediately after the Dewey system, and was designed to improve upon the DDC by exploring a different method. The LCC has a much longer listing of general categories, probably in an effort to demarcate detail. The LCC has been criticized for lacking a sound theoretical basis; the category demarcation was guided by the practical needs of the Library of Congress rather than epistemological considerations.

A -- GENERAL WORKS

B -- PHILOSOPHY. PSYCHOLOGY. RELIGION

C -- AUXILIARY SCIENCES OF HISTORY

D -- WORLD HISTORY AND HISTORY OF EUROPE, ASIA, AFRICA, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, ETC.

E -- HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS

F -- HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS

G -- GEOGRAPHY. ANTHROPOLOGY. RECREATION

H -- SOCIAL SCIENCES

J -- POLITICAL SCIENCE

K -- LAW

L -- EDUCATION

M -- MUSIC AND BOOKS ON MUSIC

N -- FINE ARTS

P -- LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Q -- SCIENCE

R -- MEDICINE

S -- AGRICULTURE

T -- TECHNOLOGY

U -- MILITARY SCIENCE

V -- NAVAL SCIENCE

Z -- BIBLIOGRAPHY. LIBRARY SCIENCE. INFORMATION RESOURCES (GENERAL)

The Secular Library Classification system was envisioned and developed by Ronald Martin upon recognizing that the subsisting classification systems were too cumbersome to organize research information into a computer filing directory.

Secular Library Classification (SLC)

organizes the subjects of knowledge in a manner that is determined to be "scientific," and subsequently, a 7 categories partitioning system has emerged from the rigorous deliberation of a lot of subject areas. Development of the SLC suggests that both of the popular library classification systems have outlived their benefit to enhancing the learning experience for the student and researcher, and that this inconspicuous system is the succeeding step in enhancing the students' ability to understand the relationships of subjects, and ultimately a tool for measuring dialectic comparisons - reasoning.