HIP-HOP, HOPE & HEALING

Rex Smallboy raps in protest of the horrendous treatment of indigenous people in Canada to direct attention to the devastating impacts of colonialism. Rex’s music echoes generations of indigenous truth and perseverance. It is a call for justice to uplift and honour the spirit and strength of his people.


Rex is a proud sober father breaking cycles of abuse healing intergenerational trauma from genocide and colonization. Rex faced his own dark history of domestic abuse by turning to the Warriors Against Violence program in Vancouver, BC for help along with getting professional psychological counselling. As part of his healing process Rex performs an apology song to address his harmful behaviour demonstrating the importance of taking accountability.


In 2001 Rex's determination as an artist and manager helped lead the group War Party to be the first indigenous rappers to break into the mainstream music industry in Canada. Their music video for Feelin’ Reserved (produced by Tom Crier) gained the group professional recognition and success after they appeared nationally on Much Music Rap City.


In 2004 Rex featured rap music legend Chuck D on the album War Party the Resistance.


In 2005 Rex performed at the Canadian Pavilion with War Party for the World Expo held in Nagoya, Japan. The group disbanded that year.


In 2009 Rex joined forces with the Southern Ontario Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative (SOADI) to produce a youth rap album written to help prevent diabetes.


In 2018 Rex Smallboy was featured on the song Lost in the Cycle by Toronto rap artist Plex which successfully charted on the Indigenous Music Countdown.


In 2019 Rex worked with Nwe Jinan Studios teaching music production to indigenous youth in First nation’s communities.


In 2020 Rex was recognized for his work with War Party as a trailblazer in the SPEAK UP project with the National Music Centre in Calgary.


Rex Smallboy is currently working on a release to address the discovery of thousands of bodies of indigenous children at residential schools across Canada. Rex Smallboy is from Maskwacis and is now based out of Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh territory.

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