The New Jersey March for Science is a satellite march of the March for Science being held in Washington D.C. on the same day.

On April 22nd, Earth Day, we will be meeting outside the Trenton War Memorial in Trenton, NJ to begin our event with a speaking program. The start time is 10:00 a.m.

We will then march in solidarity with the participants at the Washington D.C. March for Science as well as those marching in states across our nation and the world.

Our march route, which is approximately a half mile in length, will then take us to the New Jersey State House Annex. The Annex, which boasts Thomas Edison State University and the New Jersey State Museum & Planetarium as its bookends, was constructed in the late 1920s. Originally, it housed the State Library, State Museum and State Judiciary. Today it is where our legislators have their offices and hold committee meetings.

Upon arrival at the Annex, we'll hear a call to action from a short list of speakers. More details and surprises to come regarding the end of our event, so please check back often.

Our New Jersey March for Science's Mission

The New Jersey March for Science affirms the guiding statement of the National March for Science (https://www.marchforscience.com/mission/):

“The March for Science champions robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity.

We unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good and for political leaders and policy makers

to enact evidence based policies in the public interest.”

We as scientists, students, teachers, doctors, engineers, and concerned citizens have chosen to March for Science to bring attention to important issues that we see as threatening the safety of our fellow citizens, our state, our national character, and the endeavor of scientific exploration.

  • Fact-Based Policies: We demand that our leaders take into account the best available scientific evidence when making their decisions, in particular in the areas of climate change, healthcare, energy policy, public safety, education, and resource management. We reject attempts to silence the voices bringing attention to scientific evidence of the serious problems faced by our society, and we reject politically-motivated attacks on scientific research in any field.
  • Free Inquiry: As scientific study requires open exchange of ideas and free association across ethnic, religious, and national lines, we demand that the right to speech, travel, and association be protected to the fullest extent, in keeping with the highest ideals and traditions of the United States. Beyond the damage done to our nation’s scientific and economic output, such policies are violations of our human rights, and should be opposed regardless of their impact on science.
  • Education: We demand that public education be protected and strengthened, to provide for our next generation of scientists, engineers, and innovators, as well as for our future artists, writers, and musicians, whose contributions are equally critical for a healthy democracy. The lack of quality education for all American children robs them of opportunities and deprives all of us of the fruits of their talents.

For these reasons, we have chosen to March for Science. We march so that scientific evidence will be taken seriously. We march because our friends and colleagues are being targeted unjustly. We march because we are concerned about the next generation. We hope you will join us on April 22, in Trenton, in DC, or elsewhere. And we hope you will join us afterwards, for all the work that needs to be done.

Going Green for the Earth and for Science

We invite march participants to wear the color green on April 22nd.

Green is the color of environmentalism, and while this March is not only about climate change, it is certainly a big motivator for many of those marching .

The iconic pictures of a sea of pink hats from the Women's March shows how powerful having a cohesive visual theme can be. While reproducing the success of the pink pussy hats will be difficult to pull off (for one thing, April 22 might be a bit warm for a wool hat), we've decided to pick the color green as our unifying color. In the spirit of unity, we ask that you try to incorporate something green into your march attire (hat, jacket, shirt, socks, bracelet, jewelry, shoes, etc.), if possible.

On April 22nd, we unite and stand in solidarity with not only the individuals at the March for Science in Washington D.C., but with other satellite science marches across the United States and globally. The color green unifies us all. Join us in Trenton on April 22nd to show your support for science and evidence-based solutions to the problem of climate change.

Who is Planning This Event?

The NJ March for Science Steering Committee Membership

Matthew R Buckley is the founder of the New Jersey March for Science and a lead organizer. He is an assistant professor of theoretical astrophysics at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, studying the particle physics and astrophysics of dark matter — the mysterious material that gravitationally binds galaxies together. He grew up in Manchester, VT and went to Kenyon College in Ohio. He obtained his Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008, and did post-graduate work at the California Institute of Technology and the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. He was hired at Rutgers as research faculty in 2013, and became an assistant professor in 2015. He writes about physics at www.physicsmatt.com.

Elizabeth Meyer is the founder and lead organizer of the Women's March on New Jersey, held in Trenton in January. She continues in the lead organizing role for the NJ March for Science. She is a New Jersey native who grew up in Wayne and now lives in Central New Jersey with her husband and two young daughters. She graduated from William Paterson University with a B.A. in Communication, a minor in political science, and a New Jersey teaching certificate. She worked for four years in the radio industry in the New York and New Jersey markets as a producer, news anchor and reporter, and on-air personality. Elizabeth has twelve years experience as a middle school educator in both urban and suburban districts, teaching history, reading, writing, photography, theater, and character education. She is a science enthusiast who believes facts are facts. Period. When meeting with the march's organizing committee, you'll often find her with a dictionary of scientific terms in her hand trying to figure out what the scientists around her are actually saying. Elizabeth likens herself to "Penny" on the Big Bang Theory, now that she's surrounded by such accomplished and brilliant members of the scientific community.

Ms. Azra Baig is a Community Activist. She was a member of the Steering Committee of the historic Women's March On NJ where she lead the People's Pledge to Stand Up for Democracy and Justice. Ms. Baig received her Bachelors of Science in Nursing (BSN) Degree from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH and is a Registered Nurse who works in the Princeton and North Brunswick Public School Systems. She is a member of the South Brunswick School District Board of Education and works as a Commissioner for several South Brunswick Township Commissions including the Women's Commission, Municipal Alliance Commission, Human Relations Commission and the Volunteer Nurse Corp. She is a former Board of Overseer at the Islamic Society of Central Jersey and has been a panelist for the Center for American Women and Politics, encouraging the participation of women in politics, government and leadership roles. In addition, she is a member of several civic and political organizations which include the South Asian Community Outreach, American Muslims for Democracy, New Jersey Muslim Voter Project, and the New Jersey Democratic State Committee South Asian American Caucus, where she serves as Middlesex County Director. She was awarded a Community Service Award this year by the American Muslim Council for her dedication and commitment to the community. In her spare time, Ms. Baig is a freelance reporter for a local news outlet, enjoys physical fitness, and is a Marathoner. She is married and has two daughters.

Dr. Yucan Chiu is the son of Chinese immigrants who came to the US after the lifting of the Chinese Exclusion Act in the 1960s. His father came to do his PhD in neuroscience; Dr. Chiu was born while he was doing his post-doc at the University of Chicago. While Dr. Chiu has a biology degree from the University of California, San Diego (and one publication as an undergrad), his path has gone a very different direction since then, with post-graduate studies in theology and missiology. He now leads a network that starts multiethnic faith communities in urban areas next to major global universities, and is a chaplain at Rutgers to graduate students and faculty. Dr. Chiu sees no contradiction between faith and science (philosophical presuppositions aside), and has worked with many stellar scientists who are people of faith. Dr. Chiu is excited to work together for the goals of the NJ March for Science.

Rev. Dr. Linda Lillian Kroouze DuBreuil is the Pastor of Faith United Church of Christ in Union, New Jersey. She is graduate of Rutgers University and New Brunswick Theological Seminary. Dr. DuBreuil has also had careers in theater, business, and education.The central theme of her life has been one of service and dedication to social justice issues. She is a frequent speaker at interfaith events and public forums as a community activist and advocate. A native of Bristol PA, Dr. DuBreuil has lived and worked in Union Township for over 12 years. On March 8, 2017, she will be honored as the township's Woman of the Year. Dr. DuBreuill is delighted to be a part of the NJ March for Science steering committee and is dedicated to continuing to teach and preach the importance of community and justice.

Environment New Jersey is a citizen-based environmental advocacy project of Environment America. They believe there’s something special about New Jersey — something worth protecting and preserving for future generations. Whether it's relaxing at Cape May, birdwatching at the Great Swamp, or hiking through our northern Highlands, New Jersey's natural wonders enrich our lives in countless ways. Yet the places we love and the environmental values so many of us share are too often threatened by powerful industries, shortsighted politicians and more. Defending our environment requires independent research, tough-minded advocacy and spirited grassroots action. Funded by supporters, Environment NJ researches the challenges confronting our environment and educates the public about what’s at stake. Through research reports, news conferences, interviews with reporters, op-ed pieces, letters to the editor and more, they raise awareness of environmental issues and promote sensible solutions. When decisions are being made about our environment, our elected officials hear plenty from the oil companies, developers and other powerful interests. Environment NJ makes the case for our environment and help people make your voice heard, through petitions, emails, letters, phone calls and more, all delivered to the right people just when it matters most. Doug O'Malley, Executive Director, represents the organization on our committee.

Sophia Gershman, PhD., is a Physicist at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory where she conducts her research in medium and atmospheric pressure plasmas. Her areas of interest include plasma processes (discharge phenomena and instabilities), plasma diagnostics (electrical diagnostics, fast imaging, and emission spectroscopy), and plasma applications for the treatment of solid surfaces, liquids, and for environmental applications. She is a science educator and her past experience includes working on the Framework for the New Generation Science Standards as a member of the Physical Science Design Team with the Board on Science Education, National Academies of Sciences, participating in a bilateral US-China Department of Education exchange on Science Education, and developing research programs for high school students. She currently teaches Physics and Issues in Science at the New Brunswick High School where she also continues to write curricula aligned with the New Generation Science Standards and participates in the development of new STEM programs. Sophia Gershman is a mother of an adult son with mental disabilities, an active promoter of the rights of all vulnerable populations, a Jew, and a refugee from the Soviet Union who is acutely aware of the challenges facing our democracy.

Bill Kane is an aspiring teacher who has worked in the mental health field with at-risk youth, schizophrenic adults, and substance abusers. He is with The Justice Democrats who campaign to get corporation money out of politics, extend healthcare and higher education to all citizens, and promote a progressive platform. Visit their website at https://justicedemocrats.com/platform/

New Jersey Chapter Sierra Club - The Sierra Club is a national, member-supported environmental organization, which seeks to influence public policy in both Washington and the state capitals through public education and grassroots political action. Their members and professional staff engage in (1) Lobbying - for and against legislation at federal, state and local levels; (2) Outings for the appreciation of wilderness - locally, nationally and internationally, on foot, by canoe, on skis, by bicycle, etc., (3) Campaign support for legislative candidates pledged to defend our interests, (4) Social interaction at monthly, local Group meetings, and (5) Lawsuits, where necessary. With about 20,000 members, the New Jersey Chapter is the 10th largest of the 65 chapters in the USA, Canada and Mexico. They have full-time professional staff in their Trenton office, and many Local Groups, which hold monthly meetings in various locations throughout the State. Jeff Tittel, Executive Director, represents the New Jersey Chapter Sierra Club, on our committee.

New Jersey Education Association - The New Jersey Education Association is a diverse, democratic organization working to create an optimal environment to achieve excellence in public education in New Jersey. The mission of the New Jersey Education Association is to advance and protect the rights, benefits, and interests of members, and promote a quality system of public education for all students. The NJEA strives to preserve and improve the economic interests, working conditions, job security, and pensions of all members and to strengthen the Association by maximizing membership, developing leadership, and supporting affiliates. The NJEA is committed to promoting and delivering quality professional development for educators. It advances and supports policies that enhance and enrich public education. Marybeth Beichert, Associate Director Government Relations, represents the NJEA on our committee. For more information about NJEA, please visit them at https://www.njea.org/

Chip O'Brien is a biracial gay transman, a high school English teacher, and an organizer with the Jersey Justice Action Network, a progressive activist group in Bergen County, NJ. JJAN's mission is to catalyze action that supports democracy and social justice and confronts racism, sexism, xenophobia, and inequality in all its forms. You can find them at jerseyjusticeaction.org.

The Rutgers AAUP-AFT union represents more than 7,00 instructors, researchers, librarians, and financial aid counselors at the Newark, New Brunswick, and Camden campus of Rutgers University. They uphold, promote and defend values essential to the protection of quality public higher education. Those values include academic freedom, tenure, shared governance, due process, access to education, research funding and diversity. At the same time, the organization aims to enhance the quality of work life by negotiating terms and conditions of employment for those employees they represent. The Rutgers AAUP-AFT is represented on the NJ March for Science’s steering committee by David M. Hughes, President of Rutgers AAUP-AFT, and a professor of anthropology, as well as Patrick Nowlan, Rutgers AAUP-AFT's Executive Director.

Dr. Andrew Zwicker is an Assemblyman representing New Jersey's 16th Legislative District. Andrew is a lifelong New Jersey resident, a physicist, and the Head of Science Education at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory. In his role at the Lab, where researchers are developing an advanced form of energy, he has worked with hundreds of teachers and students, inspiring professionals and the next generation in the promise of technology. The American Association of Physics Teachers named him as one of the country’s top 75 “Leading Contributors” to physics education. Andrew also is well experienced in business operations, having managed a $1 million annual budget and a diverse staff over many years. Recently, teaming with tech sector leaders, he helped spearhead a novel public-private partnership focused on developing green energy. Andrew is also an academic advisor at Princeton University, an academic-athletic fellow for the women's soccer team, a part-time lecturer in the Princeton University Writing Program, and the President of the Princeton Chapter of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society. Additionally, he is the Editor for the newsletter, Physics and Society, a publication from the American Physical Society where he is also a Fellow. Andrew is also on the Board of Directors of the Research and Development Council of NJ.

The New Jersey March for Science is committed to diversifying its team of organizers to reflect various fields of science as well as areas of our community directly impacted by those fields. It is with that in mind that Matthew and Elizabeth have reached out to a myriad of diverse organizations and individuals to assist with the planning of this event.

Our Partners

The NJ March for Science is proud to stand together with its sponsors as it celebrates and defends the scientific and education communities:

  • ARISE, Inc. - The mission of ARISE is to provide advanced and comprehensive research experience to a broad range of high school students. Exposure to hands-on research is key to attracting young minds to STEM fields. The unique experience ARISE provides develops science exploration skills, enhances the depth of scientific knowledge, and integrates students into the science community. National data and their own track record show that long-term, authentic learning experiences can play a crucial role in the development of our future science workforce. The ARISE program will open opportunities for exploration to a broader range and a greater number of students to work on long-term, research projects. ARISE includes scientists and educators with extensive research mentorship experience. Their scientific and technical expertise enables them to deliver exceptionally effective program opportunities generally unavailable to high school students. For more information, please visit ARISE, Inc. at http://arisenj.org/.
  • The Association for Women in Science- New Jersey Chapter - The Association for Women in Science (AWIS) is the largest multi-disciplinary organization for women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Established in 1995, AWIS NJ empowers and promotes women scientists through programs that facilitate career development, education, networking, leadership and entrepreneurial opportunities. Throughout the year they offer events that explore scientific content and career development, often in collaboration with regional organizations, companies and universities whose missions align with this vision. Their partners support their vision and their mission to promote policies that increase women representation in STEM and leadership positions by fostering a positive public image of women in STEM. For more information, please visit AWIS-NJ at http://www.awisnj.org/.
  • The Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA) is a grassroots citizens' organization bringing together people of all ages, backgrounds, professions, and political persuasions in support of three goals: global abolition of nuclear weapons, a peace economy, and a halt to weapons trafficking at home and abroad. CFPA is a regional organization which also does intersectional organizing on a number of campaigns relating to our permanent goals, such as No Wars, No Warming, Ceasefire NJ gun violence prevention campaign, Voting Integrity, and the Interfaith Network on Drone Warfare. For more information please visit their website at www.peacecoalition.org.
  • Communications Workers of America Local 1036 is a union representing over 7,000 working families around the state, including career scientists, technical staff, and other employees at the NJ State Department of Environmental Protection, Department of Health, and Department of Agriculture. CWA Local 1036 also represents a diverse range of other professions, including workers in the NJ courts, counties, municipalities, and private sector health care. Members of CWA 1036 strongly advocate for good, efficient public services and smart government that make a difference in our daily lives. CWA 1036 members have dedicated their professional careers to protect our drinking water, clean air, land use development, streams and waterways, and our state’s natural resources like beaches and parks. They oversee large chemical producers and nuclear power plants. They study and address cancer clusters, screen newborns for chronic diseases, act as the State’s lab for environmental and health testing, and administer public health programs. CWA 1036 members also run our school child nutrition programs, work with farmers to ensure safe, healthy produce and dairy, and run the NJ Jersey Fresh program. For more information, visit www.cwa1036.org.
  • Communications Workers of America New Jersey represents more than 70,000 working families in New Jersey, including more than 40,000 state workers, 15,000 county and local government workers, and thousands of workers in the telecommunications and direct-care industries. CWA New Jersey includes over 30 chartered local unions and is led by our President Chris Shelton and Area Director Hetty Rosenstein. We use “the triple threat,” the CWA Triangle, as our model for building power & representing the interests of all our working & retired members & their families. CWA New Jersey is part of CWA District 1, which includes New York, New Jersey and New England and is led by District 1 Vice President Dennis Trainor. CWA is affiliated at the national, state and local level with the American Federation of Labor–Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO). For more information on CWA New Jersey, please visit them at http://cwanj.org/.
  • Environment New Jersey is a citizen-based environmental advocacy project of Environment America. They believe there’s something special about New Jersey — something worth protecting and preserving for future generations. Whether it's relaxing at Cape May, birdwatching at the Great Swamp, or hiking through our northern Highlands, New Jersey's natural wonders enrich our lives in countless ways. Yet the places we love and the environmental values so many of us share are too often threatened by powerful industries, shortsighted politicians and more. Defending our environment requires independent research, tough-minded advocacy and spirited grassroots action. Funded by supporters, Environment NJ researches the challenges confronting our environment and educates the public about what’s at stake. Through research reports, news conferences, interviews with reporters, op-ed pieces, letters to the editor and more, they raise awareness of environmental issues and promote sensible solutions. When decisions are being made about our environment, our elected officials hear plenty from the oil companies, developers and other powerful interests. Environment NJ makes the case for our environment and help people make your voice heard, through petitions, emails, letters, phone calls and more, all delivered to the right people just when it matters most. Learn more about Environment NJ at http://www.environmentnewjersey.org/.
  • Hope Rises Up is one of thousands of groups nationwide born out of the energy of the Women’s March on Washington. They are seeking to make social and political advocacy accessible to local community members who want to strengthen progressive and inclusive values and policies locally and nationally. They are based in the Hopewell Valley and welcome residents from surrounding communities to join them. Learn more about Hope Rises Up and what they are up to at www.hoperisesup.org and https://www.facebook.com/hoperisesup.
  • Jersey Justice Action Network - The mission of Jersey Justice Action Network (JJAN) is to catalyze action that supports democracy and social justice, and confronts racism, sexism, xenophobia, and inequality in all its forms. JJAN is dedicated to outreaching to and working with other change-making organizations to support progressive policies that advance our common goals. JJAN seeks to inspire action, maximize the efforts of diverse groups, provide a clearinghouse for acts of bravery, be a forum for those just finding their voice, advocate and support the advocacy of others, educate for social awareness, demystify the status quo, and encourage positive change. Please visit Jersey Justice Action Network at jerseyjusticeaction.org and https://www.facebook.com/jjactionnetwork/.
  • Lawrenceville Citizen Activists of Lawrenceville, NJ was formed as a “huddle” after the Women’s March of January 21, 2017. They currently have around thirty members and meet – usually – every two weeks. Their goals are to resist the policies of the current administration, the GOP-led congress and the senate; to work to elect more like-minded representatives in 2018 and 2020; and to increase voter registration and participation. Recent activist actions include: contacting New Jersey representatives in support of the ACA; participating in ACLU resistance training; and demanding via email, phone and postcard the investigation of the administration’s ties to Russia. Upcoming events include: the Tax March on April 15, the March for Science on April 22, the People’s Climate March on April 29 and organizing a large-scale meeting with other area resistance groups on May 22 to further activist training and coordination between groups.
  • New Jersey Sierra Club - The Sierra Club is a national, member-supported environmental organization, which seeks to influence public policy in both Washington and the state capitals through public education and grassroots political action. Their members and professional staff engage in (1) Lobbying - for and against legislation at federal, state and local levels; (2) Outings for the appreciation of wilderness - locally, nationally and internationally, on foot, by canoe, on skis, by bicycle, etc., (3) Campaign support for legislative candidates pledged to defend our interests, (4) Social interaction at monthly, local Group meetings, and (5) Lawsuits, where necessary. With about 20,000 members, the New Jersey Chapter is the 10th largest of the 65 chapters in the USA, Canada and Mexico. They have full-time professional staff in their Trenton office, and many Local Groups, which hold monthly meetings in various locations throughout the State. To learn more about the New Jersey Sierra Club, please visit them at http://www.sierraclub.org/new-jersey.
  • The New Jersey State Organization of the National Organization for Women is a state-wide women's rights activist organization consisting of 10,000 women and men members, activists, and allies. Incorporated in 1975, NOW-NJ celebrated it's 40th birthday in September of 2015. NOW-NJ has 13 chapters throughout the state, each autonomous and self-governed, on campuses and in the local community. NOW-NJ is a completely volunteer organization. The purpose of NOW-NJ is "to take action to bring women into full participation in the mainstream of American society now, exercising all privileges and responsibilities thereof in truly equal partnership with men. This purpose includes, but is not limited to, equal rights and responsibilities in all aspects of citizenship, public service, employment, education, and family life, and it includes freedom from discrimination because of race, ethnic origin, age, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or parenthood." NOW-NJ shall also have as its purpose to coordinate efforts on the state level, to provide communication among chapters and task forces, and to assist in the functioning of NOW in NJ. With 10,000 members and allies, NOW-NJ is the largest democracy-based feminist organization in New Jersey. For more information about NOW NJ, please visit them at http://www.nownj.net/.
  • Northern New Jersey Chapter, National Organization for Women is the second largest NOW chapter in the state. It was established in 1970 and serves the Bergen County area. The National Organization for Women is the largest organization of feminist activists in the United States. NOW has more than 500,000 contributing members nationwide and more than 500 local and campus affiliates in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Since their founding in 1966, NOW's goal has been "to take action" to bring about equality for all women. Both the actions NOW takes and its position on the issues are principled, uncompromising and often ahead of their time. NOW is a leader, not a follower, of public opinion. NOW activists use both traditional and non-traditional means to push for social change. NOW activists do extensive electoral and lobbying work and bring lawsuits. They also organize mass marches, rallies, pickets, non-violent civil disobedience and immediate, responsive "zap" actions. NOW's actions have established the organization as a major force in the sweeping changes that put more women in political posts; increased educational, employment and business opportunities for women; and enacted tougher laws against violence, harassment and discrimination. NOW is a multi-issue, multi-strategy organization that takes a holistic approach to women's rights. Their official priorities are winning economic equality and securing it with an amendment to the U.S. Constitution that will guarantee equal rights for women; championing abortion rights, reproductive freedom and other women's health issues; opposing racism and fighting bigotry against lesbians and gays; and ending violence against women. For more information about NNJ NOW, please visit them at http://nnj.nownj.org/.
  • The Rutgers AAUP-AFT union represents more than 7,00 instructors, researchers, librarians, and financial aid counselors at the Newark, New Brunswick, and Camden campus of Rutgers University. They uphold, promote and defend values essential to the protection of quality public higher education. Those values include academic freedom, tenure, shared governance, due process, access to education, research funding and diversity. At the same time, the organization aims to enhance the quality of work life by negotiating terms and conditions of employment for those employees they represent. Visit Rutgers AAUP-AFT at http://www.rutgersaaup.org/.
  • STAND CENTRAL NJ is a progressive grassroots organization in Central New Jersey focused on taking back power through taking local action. STAND CNJ has over 900 members (and growing daily) primarily from six counties – Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Somerset. STAND CNJ’s mission is to support our democracy from the ground up, right here in New Jersey, by fighting for social justice, economic opportunity and human rights for all. They aim to have an impact on elections and issues at the local and state levels through constituent mobilization and empowerment. Please visit STAND CNJ at http://www.standcnj.org and https://www.facebook.com/standcnj/.

For more information about sponsorship of the NJ March for Science, please email us at marchforscienceNJ@gmail.com.

The New Jersey March for Science is endorsed by:

  • DELAWARE VALLEY AMERICANS UNITED FOR THE SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE
  • FRATERNAL ORDER OF POLICE LODGE #74
  • NEW JERSEY HIGHER EDUCATION LEADERSHIP COUNCIL
  • NEW JERSEY TENANTS ORGANIZATION

More exciting announcements regarding sponsorship and endorsements coming soon. Please check back.

Directions, Transportation, and Parking

Please read carefully.

The Trenton War Memorial is located at 1 Memorial Drive in Trenton, NJ. The zip code is 08625.

The State House is located at 125 West State Street, #2, in Trenton, NJ. The zip code is 08625.

The War Memorial and the State House Annex are part of the Capitol Complex.

DRIVING DIRECTIONS AND PARKING

Directions to the War Memorial can be found here: http://www.njslom.org/WAR-MEMORIAL-DIRECTIONS.pdf

PLEASE DO NOT PARK AT THE STATE HOUSE GARAGE. We have been informed by the NJ State Police that parking in the State House garage is reserved only for those visiting or working at the State House.

UPDATE: The State Police are asking all NJ March for Science participants to arrive at the War Memorial via the MARKET STREET exit off our Route 29. There will be yellow signs, with words such as "War Memorial Event" and arrows, on Route 29, directing participants to the Market Street exit. Once on Market Street, participants should drive to the end, where they will reach a traffic light. Additional yellow signs, as well as State Police troopers, will be on Market Street to assist participants. At the light, please turn left and State Police troopers will be there to direct traffic to parking lot nears the War Memorial.

Free parking is available in the parking lot off of Market Street as well as state parking lots 5A and 5B, located across from the Trenton War Memorial. STATE POLICE TROOPERS WILL BE THERE TO DIRECT ALL TRAFFIC TO ALL OF THESE LOTS. Please do not attempt to park on your own in these areas. It is paramount that all participants are respectful of all directions given by State Police troopers upon arrival. Their ability to direct and control traffic flow of an anticipated large number of attendees is critical to creating a safe and swiftly moving arrival process. Both the State Police and Trenton Police Department have gone above any beyond their duties to accommodate our event. They have been welcoming, highly supportive and helpful, always having the safety of march participants at the forefront of every decision we've collaborated on throughout the organizing process.

There will be more than 500 available spots. Handicap parking is available in all lots as well as on West State Street in front of the State House Annex and across from the State House. There is also a small parking area dedicated to handicap parking in front of the War Memorial.

In the event, the parking lot off of Market Street, as well as lots 5A and 5B, fill up, please KNOW YOUR OPTIONS BEFORE YOU GET TO TRENTON. ADDITIONAL OPTIONS INCLUDE:

-Metered, on-street parking is available along West State Street. Please note that the meters are in service on Saturdays. You will be ticketed if fees are not paid. Some portions of West State Street may be closed due to our event.

-Several pay lots are located within walking distance. Please visit this link for more information: http://www.destinationtrenton.com/visit-trenton/parking/

-The Trenton Parking Authority owns and operates five (5) parking facilities, the Merchant Street surface lot, the Warren Street Garage, the South Broad and Front Street Garage, the, Lafayette Yard Parking Garage and the Liberty Commons Parking Facility. For more information visit http://www.tpanj.com/index.htm

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

Direct rail service to Trenton is provided by both NJ Transit (1-800-582-5946) and Amtrak (1-800-872-7245). NJ Transit also provides bus service to and within the Trenton area. Please check the following websites to confirm Saturday service schedules: http://www.njtransit.com and https://www.amtrak.com

FROM THE TRAIN STATION

Walking: South Clinton Avenue runs along the left side of the train station. Proceed up the avenue (to your right when facing the road) one block and make a left onto East State Street. (You'll soon pass the Department of Environmental Protection on your left.) At Warren Street the street becomes West State Street. Make a left onto Barrack Street. The War Memorial is right in front of you, on the left. The walk takes 10-15 minutes.

Cabs: Cabs are normally available at the rear of the train station.

Buses: Buses stop in front of the train station at the corner of South Clinton Avenue. Most service West State Street and the State House. For bus schedules, please visit http://www.njtransit.com .

Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE MARCH FOR SCIENCE AND THE CLIMATE MARCH? April 22nd, Earth Day, is the day the March for Science is being held in Washington, D.C. We are a satellite march of that event. The following week, April 29th, there is a People's Climate March, also in D.C. The thing that differentiates the Science March from the Climate March is in the mission statements. Whereas the Climate March's goal is to call attention to Climate Change and be a call to action re: Global Warming, the Science March's mission is more expansive (our NJ mission was designed to be even broader, actually). It encompasses climate change and environmental issues, as well as championing fact-based policies, free inquiry, and the protection and strengthening of public education across all fields, including STEM, for our future scientists, engineers, musicians, artists, innovators, etc. And, of course, we also take issue with the massive cuts in funding to the scientific community under the proposed federal budget.

WHAT DO I WEAR? This is an outdoor event taking place in April. It encompasses a speaking program at the War Memorial, a half mile march, and a finish at the State House Annex. When it comes to attire, please dress appropriately for the weather. Know if April showers are in the forecast and bring an umbrella, raincoat or poncho. Check the temperature. Wear comfortable shoes, since you will be on your feet for much of the event. Keep in mind that in order to show our unity and togetherness, we hope that you all will be able to wear something GREEN.

WHAT DO I BRING? The event is scheduled to take place over a period of a few hours. Please bring enough water and snacks, along with any medications you may need. We ask that you have a "carry in, carry out" policy, being sure to take any trash with you as you leave or find a trash receptacle to deposit it in. It is important to be respectful of both public and private property in the city of Trenton. Plus, march organizers are responsible for clean-up after the event and we'd hate to have to remain long afterwards to clean up a mess left behind by our participants.

Bring any signs to support any/all issues or branches of science, especially those that hold personal significance for you. If you're coming with a group, bring a sign to identify yourselves. Be creative. Keep in mind that, according to the rules and regulations for demonstrations at the State House, signs, banners, posters, and placards "must be made solely of paper or cardboard and supported by the person, not by or framed by wood, metal, or any other material of a firm nature. Nor shall they be self-supporting, affixed, or lean against a building adjacent to the State Capitol Complex grounds." Please be sure to be respectful of the city's request. The reasoning is that paper and cardboard are safer materials than wood and metal.

Unfortunately, chairs are not permitted due to, first and foremost, safety concerns, as well as the large turnout that is expected. Chairs for those of differing abilities are an exception. Limited ADA seating will be provided by march organizers. Feel free to bring a blanket, pillow, or cushion to sit on if you prefer not to stand. At all times, we must be respectful to all State Police and Trenton Police Department officers on duty. If a march volunteer or a police officer tells you that you cannot sit in a particular area, you must move or will be asked to leave the event. Again, the march has a "carry in, carry out" policy and you are expected to be responsible for the transport and removal of any items you bring to the march.

ARE THERE ANY SLOGANS FOR THE NEW JERSEY MARCH FOR SCIENCE? "Science, Not Silence" is the official slogan of the NJMS.

WHY IS THERE NO MENTION OF PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP IN YOUR MISSION STATEMENT? The NJ March for Science is a non-partisan event. We welcome all individuals who support science, regardless of political affiliation. This March is an affirmative, peaceful gathering open and safe for women, men, and their children. We want this to be an affirmative March FOR science, including all the hopes mentioned in our mission statement above. While these issues are being threatened by the President, we do not want a negative connotation to the March. We do not consider this march a protest; it is a rally in solidarity with marchers across our nation and world who are scientists and science enthusiasts and have come out to protect and support the future of science in our world.

WHERE WILL WE BE MARCHING? We will begin at the War Memorial and, after a few turns, will end at the State House Annex. The route will be approximately a half mile.

HAVE THE NECESSARY PERMITS BEEN ACQUIRED? There are two permits required for our event. The first is for use of the War Memorial and State House Annex grounds. It has been submitted and approved by the New Jersey State Police. The second permit is necessary for the march portion of our event. All necessary paperwork has been submitted to the Trenton Police Department. We are working closely with both the New Jersey State Police and the Trenton Police Department to insure this event is safe and legal.

ARE TICKETS NECESSARY FOR THE MARCH? No, tickets are not necessary. EventBrite registration is for headcount purposes only to assist with our planning. Both the War Memorial and the State House Annex are outdoors venues so capacity is not limited.

ARE ACCOMMODATIONS IN PLACE FOR THOSE WHO MAY NEED THEM? Yes. Making the march as accessible and inclusive as possible for all participants is of the utmost important to the organizers. There are designated handicap parking areas. All venues will be accessible to everyone, including the War Memorial area and the State House Annex. In addition, there will be sections of reserved seating at both venues for those of differing abilities. An ASL interpreter will at the podium during all speeches. Portable toilets accessible to everyone will be provided.

WHAT HAPPENS IF IT RAINS? If rain/showers are in the forecast, the march will be held. Bring your umbrella, a poncho/raincoat, and boots. However, in the event of downpours, heavy rains, or dangerous weather conditions, we will cancel the march. In the event the march is cancelled, any cancellation notice will be posted on this website, our NJMS Facebook page and Facebook event page, the NJMS Eventbrite page, as well as on our Twitter and Instagram accounts as soon as the decision is made (please see Contact Information listed below). Cancellation will be determined as soon as possible since we know many may be travelling long distances. Please be certain you have access to any/all of these social media venues and sign up as followers or register with these sites where applicable. Connect with others who are traveling to the march and communicate with one another. If you do not see any cancellation notices on our web outlets, the event is ON. Safety is our utmost concern. Regardless of the weather conditions, if you feel that travelling to the march poses any danger to yourself, please remain safely at home. We know you will be with us in spirit!

WILL THERE BE RESTROOM FACILITIES? Yes, attendees will have access to restrooms at both the War Memorial and on the State House Annex grounds. They will be accessible to everyone.

WILL THERE BE FOOD AVAILABLE? Food will not be served at the event. There is also a limited number of options to purchase food near the Capitol Complex. We recommend bringing any snacks you think are necessary. Bring only what you need because large backpacks and/or bags are not permitted at the March. ALL TRASH MUST BE DISPOSED OF PROPERLY. March volunteers are responsible for all clean up and, more importantly, we want be respectful to the city that is hosting our event. When in doubt, carry in, carry out!

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE? Anyone who is a supporter and lover of science is welcome. You don't have to be a scientist or own a lab coat to participate. We encourage men, women, and children of all ages to attend. We also encourage participants to come with their groups - whether it be their school, social or civil justice organization, colleagues, or friends. Bring a sign to identify yourselves.

HOW LONG WILL THE EVENT LAST? The speaking program at the War Memorial will be approximately an hour long. The length of the march is a half mile and the speed with which we progress will depend largely upon the participants. Our closing event at the State House Annex will last for about a half an hour.

ARE PRESS PASSES BEING ISSUED? Press passes are not being issued, however, press credentials are required to access any press areas designated at the event. There will be an area reserved for press at the War Memorial and State House Annex. Please plan your approach accordingly. Keep press credentials visible at all times.


Where can you find the New Jersey March for Science?

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NJMarchforScience/ and https://www.facebook.com/events/392510504446559/

Twitter and Instagram: @NJScienceMarch

Official website: https://sites.google.com/view/njmarchforscience/

For more information on the national March for Science in Washington D.C. and its satellite marches, please visit https://www.marchforscience.com/.

Email: marchforsciencenj@gmail.com

Have you officially registered on our EventBrite page? https://www.eventbrite.com/e/new-jersey-march-for-science-tickets-32020759955 (no tickets are necessary, but we're hoping you register since having a headcount assists us greatly during the planning process)

Disclaimer

The organizers of the New Jersey March for Science are volunteers and are not being compensated in any manner for their time and dedication to this event. Information is shared and disseminated as quickly as possible. Nothing in the information provided is intended to create a contractual relationship and Organizers are merely acting as facilitators to aid in the success of the event. Any person participating in the New Jersey March for Science does so at their own risk and at their own expense. No warranty of any kind, express or implied, are made by the New Jersey March for Science Organizers and Sponsors nor are Organizers and Sponsors liable for any monetary loss, personal injury, cancellation of event or misinformation. Participants release New Jersey March for Science Organizers and Sponsors from any and all legal liability and acknowledge that participation is at their own risk.

Please check this website often. Information is subject to change or be added at any time.