Program overview

With years of experience in professional education in the community, we know how to equip our younger generation with the necessary tools and skills for success. This session curriculum continues to offer the acclaimed courses from the past sessions and ensures that our children will have productive and fulfilling time!

2021 Spring Semester Courses: ( February 28 - May 8, 2021 )

Language - Learning effective communication skills allows our students to express themselves and benefits them in the future

English Reading- Elementary School (Grade 3~4) (Time: Thursday 4:30~6:00PM)

Course Description

This course is designed to help instill a love of literature in students from an early age through a book club format. We will be reading The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo) over the course of 9 weeks. During this course we will learn and review the elements of fiction (plot, characters, setting, theme, and conflict) within the genres of Fairy Tales and Epics. The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane follows the format for an epic such as The Odyssey and The Iliad. This course prepares students to be the kind of readers who think critically and creatively about literature. Students will leave with a newfound joy in reading.

Main Standards Addressed

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.2

Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.2

Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.3

Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.3

Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.5

Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.5

Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.9

Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.9

Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

Materials Required

● Access to the book: The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo (hard copy or digital copy)

● Reader’s Notebook (can be used)

● Post-It Notes / Padlet

Course Schedule: Thursday’s from 4:30-6:00pm

Week 1 (March 4th, 2021)

Lesson: Introduction to Literature

● Introduce ourselves: Draw a time you have had success as a reader? A time you have struggled as a reader?

● Introduce Stop & Jot Strategy to record our thinking

● Book Talk

In-Class Activity: Read Chapter 1 together & practice stopping and jotting

Homework:

● Read Chapters 2-4

● Stop & Jot at least once per chapter

Week 2 (March 11th, 2021)

Lesson: Elements of Fiction (Characters)

Notice How a Character Talks & Acts to Develop a Pattern

In-Class Activity: TBD

Homework

● Read Chapters 5-7

● Stop & Jot at least once per chapter

Week 3 (March 18th, 2021)

Lesson: Elements of Fiction (Plot & Setting)

Consider What Role Other Characters & the Setting Play in Edward’s Life

In-Class Activity: TBD

Homework:

● Read Chapters 8-10

● Stop & Jot at least once per chapter

Week 4 (March 25th, 2021)

Lesson: Elements of Fiction (Conflict)

Track Edward’s Problems & How He Reacts

In-Class Activity: TBD

Homework:

● Read Chapters 11-14

● Stop & Jot at least once per chapter

Week 5 (April 1st, 2021)

Lesson: Elements of Fiction (Theme)

Explore the Lesson(s) Edward is Learning

In-Class Activity: TBD

Homework:

● Read Chapters 15-19

● Stop & Jot at least once per chapter

Spring Break No Class on April 8th

Enjoy time with family & friends :)

Week 6 (April 15th, 2021)

Lesson: Elements of Fiction (Characters)

Come Up with a Theory About Edward & Use it to Make Predictions

In-Class Activity: TBD

Homework:

● Read Chapters 20-22

● Stop & Jot at least once per chapter

Week 7 (April 22nd, 2021)

Lesson: Elements of Fiction (Plot & Setting)

Consider What Role Other Characters & the Setting Play in Edward’s Life

In-Class Activity: TBD

Homework:

● Read Chapters 23-24

● Stop & Jot at least once per chapter

Week 8 (April 29th, 2021)

Lesson: Elements of Fiction (Conflict)

Notice How Edward Is Tested During the Story’s Climax

In-Class Activity: TBD

Homework:

● Read Chapters 25-Coda (The End)

● Stop & Jot at least once per chapter

● Finish your final project and be ready to present next week

Week 9 (May 6th, 2021)

Lesson: Elements of Fiction (Theme)

Notice How Edward Resolves His Problems

In-Class Activity:

Final Project Presentation

Instructor: Ms. Lindsey Harper

Lindsey Harper received her Bachelors of Arts in Early Childhood Education from Cedarville University. She resides in Columbus, Ohio with her husband Joe and dog Jurgen. Lindsey Harper is certified to teacher Pre-Kindergarten through fifth grade in Ohio. She taught fourth grade for 3 years, and is currently teaching third grade online where she specializes in planning and teaching reading and science for her grade level team. Lindsey Harper has been an avid reader her entire life and desires to share her love of reading with her students.

English Writing - Elementary School (Grade 4~5) (Time: Wednesday 7:00~8:30PM)

This course, designed for fourth and fifth grade students, teaches and reviews foundational writing skills and explores various types of writing styles. It aims to help students become stronger, more educated writers using small projects and writing assignments throughout the term. The course also includes a review of grammar rules and best practices for writers aided by discussions and group activities.

The students and instructor will meet virtually once a week for nine weeks, with each session lasting 90 minutes. The class will take two weeks for detailed study and practical application of the four main writing styles: narrative, descriptive, persuasive, and expository. Students should leave this course with a reinforced understanding of core writing concepts, ultimately making them more comfortable and confident writers.


Weekly Overview:

Week 1: Introduction to Writing

Write and share self introductions

Lesson: Good Writing Habits

Introduce Paragraph Planner graphic organizer


Week 2: Narrative Writing Part 1

Lesson: Steps of the Writing Process

Introduce narrative style with reading sample

Select topic and draft narrative story


Week 3: Narrative Writing Part 2

Lesson: Using Transitions in Writing

In-class activity: Transition words writing game

Revise narrative story


Week 4: Descriptive Writing Part 1

Lesson: Parts of Speech in Descriptive Language

Introduce descriptive style with reading sample

Begin sensory writing assignment


Week 5: Descriptive Writing Part 2

Lesson: Adding Details to Writing

In-class peer review of sensory writing draft

Revise sensory writing assignment


Week 6: Persuasive Writing Part 1

Lesson: Facts vs. Opinions

Introduce persuasive style with reading sample

Draft persuasive letter or email using OREO format


Week 7: Persuasive Writing Part 2

Lesson: Etiquette for Letter and Email Writing

In-class activity: Proofread and correct sample letters

Revise and share letter or email


Week 8: Expository Writing Part 1

Lesson: Research and Summary Writing

Introduce expository style with reading sample

Read and outline article using RRLC strategy

Begin drafting article summary


Week 9: Expository Writing Part 2 and Review

Lesson: Writing Strong Introductions and Conclusions

In-class activity: Practicing paragraph structure

Revise article summary

Instructor: Jade Ge

Jade is a senior student in Greenhill School in Ann Arbor and she is going to University of Michigan in Fall 2021. Jade has maintained straight As in English throughout her entire academic career, and her ACT English score was a 35. Jade has been the active member of her school’s forensics team as a storyteller. Now she has been the coach to the middle school teams for last two years. Jade is the president of her school’s theater club. She loves to work with kids.

English Writing - Middle School (Grade 6~8) (Time: Wednesday 7:00~8:30PM)

This writing-intensive course is designed for students entering grades 6-7-8.

For this course, we will be laying a foundation for English writing across the curriculum. We’ll be covering ways to write building blocks for essays, to more creative endeavors like flash fiction and poetry, and even some of the basics of writing a good thesis statement. Students will engage in peer review of each other’s work. We’ll also practice writing in different mediums and formats! Students will leave with a portfolio to showcase their work by the end of the course with an accompanying reflection on their progress and growth as writers.


Description: Students will practice various types of writing, working through the writing process and receiving formative feedback on their work. We will also use class time to read short texts and excerpts to discuss and emulate style. Students should leave the class feeling more confident with their writing skills and with a toolbox of skills to approach any writing task.


Weekly Overview:

Week 1: Intro/Flash Fiction I

1. Introduction

2. Set Personal Writing Goals

3. Flash Stories/Styles (In-class discussion)

4. Flash Story Prompt for Week 2

Week 2: Flash Fiction II

1. Share flash stories

2. Revision Exercises (sentence level)

3. Peer Review of Flash Stories

4. Poems/Readings for Week 3

Week 3: Poetry I

1. Poetry styles (in-class discussion)

2. In-Class Group Poetry Exercises

3. Poetry Prompts/Readings for week 4

Week 4: Poetry II

1. Share Poems

2. In-Class Revision Exercises

3. Peer Review of Poems

4. Intro to Paragraphs/Thesis Statements for Week 5

Week 5: Short Essay/Thesis Statements I

1. Overview of Readings Good Short Essay Writing

2. Close Reading of our class text

3. In-class thesis statement/paragraph exercises

4. Prompts for Paragraph/Thesis Statement Exercises for Week 6

Week 6: Paragraphs/Thesis Statements II

1. Share paragraphs and draft thesis statements

2. Draft thesis statements peer review

3. Multimodal Project Prompt

Week 7: Revision and Multimodal Writing I

1. Revision Discussion (Before and After comparisons)

2. Multimodal Project Drafts Due

3. Peer Review Multimodal Projects

4. Reflective Writing/Portfolio Prompt

Week 8: Revision and Multimodal II/ Final Portfolio

1. Reflective Writing Due

2. Final Portfolios Due

3. Goal Discussion/Class Reading

Instructor: Joe Thornton

Mr. Joe Thornton holds a Master of Arts degree in English from Miami University of Ohio. He has taught courses in composition, literature, ESL, and creative writing, with special focus areas in multimodal writing and graphic literature. His nonfiction essays and short stories have appeared in The Ryder, Blue Lake Review, Under the Gum Tree, and Killjoy Magazine. He is Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief of the literary magazine Bad Pony. He lives and teaches writing in Southeast Michigan.

English writing - High School ACT/SAT (Grade 9~12) (Time: Wednesday 7:00~8:30PM)

This course will help students improve their writing skills by focusing on different styles of writing each week. We will start with shorter writing assignments at the beginning, and build into larger projects toward the end of the semester. By the end of the semester, each student will gain confidence in writing and be able to write across various genres.

Each week will consist of one hour of full-class instruction and one hour of smaller-group interaction. Specific assignments will be given on a weekly basis. In addition to the activities listed below, students will do regular vocabulary and grammar exercises. Schedule subject to change.

Week 1

Introduction to class. Unit 1: Personal/Creative Essays.

Week 2

Share Personal/Creative Essay drafts. Revision exercises.

Week 3

Begin Unit 2: Analytical Writing. Discuss literary analysis.

Week 4

Share Analytical essay drafts. Revision exercises. Begin discussing research methods.

Week 5

Begin Unit 3: Persuasive Writing Discuss argumentation styles.

Week 6

Review Persuasive essay drafts. Discuss logical fallacies. Revision exercises. Continue research methods.

Week 7

Begin Unit 4: Research essays. Review research essay drafts.

Week 8

Final research papers and completed writing portfolio.

Teacher : Joe Thornton

Mr. Joe Thornton holds a Master of Arts degree in English from Miami University of Ohio. He has taught courses in composition, literature, ESL, and creative writing, with special focus areas in multimodal writing and graphic literature. His nonfiction essays and short stories have appeared in The Ryder, Blue Lake Review, Under the Gum Tree, and Killjoy Magazine. He is Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief of the literary magazine Bad Pony. He lives and teaches writing in Southeast Michigan.

Public Speaking - Middle School - Level I (Grade 6~7 ) (Time: Tuesday 4:30~6:30PM)

About: This public speaking class caters to understanding different styles of speech, such as debate, forensics, and presenting to improving public speaking skills. Students will be able to use critical thinking skills. They will practice making persuasive arguments, engage in discussion, games, and activities, as well as present on a wide array of topics.

Week 1: Persuasion

· Introduction – get to know you

· Speaking tips – How to act, look, and present your information in different types of public speaking

· Two truths and a lie game

· Questions and answers – KWL chart – what you know, want to know, and have learned

Homework: All About Me Presentation – Students will create a short presentation all about them, using visuals and the speaking tips learned from class

Week 2: Presenting

· Present All About Me Presentations

· Infomercial Game – Students will have to inform other students about a product and convince them to buy, putting into use persuasion and speaking tips that were learned from the earlier discussion

Week 3: Debate

· Introduction to argumentation

· Questioning activity – Students will learn to ask and direct questions during a debate and throughout speeches

· Flowing – Learning to take notes during a speech and debate

· Absurd Statements Game – Students will have to give arguments supporting silly topics

· Introduction to mini-debates – topics assigned to students

Homework: Write 3 pro and 3 con arguments to your assigned topic

Week 4: Debate

· Present mini-debates

· Practicing note taking (flowing) during speeches

· Role of the judge Discussion – Understanding debate from the audience or judge perspective


Week 5: Research to form speech

· Research discussion

· Finding good and bad quality evidence

· Reading evidence and finding sources

· Introduction to forensics

· Pass out topics to research

Homework: Research selected topic

Week 6: Forensics – Sales Presentation

· Present research found

· Introduction to forensics

· Discussion on elements needed in presentations

· Assign products to research

Week 7: Forensics –Impromptu Speaking

· Present sales presentations

· Introduction to impromptu speaking

· How to give a speech with little planning

· Impromptu speaking practice

Week 8:

· Jeopardy Game – what we’ve learned throughout the class

Week 9: Student’s Choice

· Students will be the focus of the discussion – asking questions and providing activities they would like to work on before wrapping up the class to get ready to use their public speaking skills in everyday situations

If you have any questions – feel free to email me at shannonnierman@gmail.com

Teacher Introduction: My name is Ms. Nierman and I will be teaching this public speaking/speech class. I have been a part of the speech community for 12 years. I debated in both high school and college and currently coach debate, as well as judge forensics. Besides helping students after school with public speaking, I am also a 3rd grade teacher in Detroit.

Public Speaking - Middle School - Level II (Grade 7~8 ) (Time: Tuesday 7:00~9:00PM)

About: This public speaking class is a continuation for students that have taken a previous public speaking course through the program. Students increase their knowledge of public speaking styles such as debate, forensics, impromptu, presentations, sales, and extemporaneous skills. They will review these styles through discussions, new games and activities, presentations, as well as some research on given speeches.

Week 1: Informative Speaking

Students will practice informative speaking; focusing on speeches in which they inform the audience about a specific topic, product, or person

· Informative Invention Activity – Students will inform others about an object as if we do not know what it is – the idea is to strengthen how we provide and present information to someone through speech and conversation

Week 2: Impromptu

Students will practice speeches that require no preparation time. They will learn to strengthen confidence in “thinking on their feet”

· Background Activity – Students will be given a topic to give audience the background and understanding of it on the spot

· Continuation Stories – Students will go person by person adding onto each other’s story to form a complete story with everyone’s participation – students will not know what the other students will say until seconds before their turn

Week 3: Debate

Students will practice debate through argumentation; picking topics of interest and understanding both sides to it

· Students will be given topics that have different arguments for and against that idea; they will prepare and present those points as well as answer questions from the audience (other students in the class)

Week 4: Debate & Forensics

Students will move a step further within their debate skills, presenting their strengths and weaknesses of a topic with prior research to support their points

· Students will do prior research on the topic, providing specific sources and evidence to support their positions in the debate – this time their classmates will be their opponents

Week 5: Extemporaneous

Students will practice giving speech topics with limited preparation time. The will have various topics to quickly write out notes and/or research before presenting the speech.

Week 6: Broadcasting

Students will practice confidence and tone in speaking when learning broadcasting. They will pretend to be news anchors covering different stories. This will teach them presenting information to an audience and focus on the topic.

· News Anchor Activity – Students will play the role of a news anchor practicing their ability to discuss and inform audience about the topic, while also focusing on their presentation of how they reveal the news

Week 7: Sales

Students will research a product and gives a sales presentation on what they have found. They will look up pricing, description of the product, as well as a catchy slogan to get the audience interested in their product.

· Sales Presentations – Students will research a product or game convincing the class that their product should be picked over any of the competition; allowing the students practice in organization with information and data in speeches

Week 8: Personalized Speeches

Students with have various personalized speeches to construct to start wrapping up the class. Students will practice speaking in a job interview, college admission interview, class president school speeches, and much more.

Week 9: Student’s Choice

Students will be allowed to provide feedback on what they would like to practice before concluded the class. It can range from a style we’ve practiced to anything that they would like to gain and prepare for before utilizing these strategies in the real world and other classes!

If you have any questions – feel free to email me at shannonnierman@gmail.com

Teacher Introduction: Ms. Nierman will be teaching this public speaking/speech class. She has been a part of the speech community for 12 years. She debated in both high school and college and currently coach debate, as well as judge forensics. Besides helping students after school with public speaking, she was also a 3rd grade teacher in Detroit.

Public Speaking - High School (Grade 9~12) (Time: Tuesday 7:00~8:30PM)

Public Speaking is essential to one’s growth in society. People must be able to get their message across to others. Unfortunately, according to the Book of Lists, public speaking ranks as the number one thing people fear the most, above even death. It is important for students to begin their exploration of public speaking in middle and high school. It only gets harder the longer one waits. This class will focus on both how to present to an audience, and how to craft an effective message for an audience. Skills covered will include presentation preparation, organization, language use, posture, stance, eye contact, presentational voice, and various presentational styles.

Tentative syllabus

Session 1 Introduction

Dealing with nerves

Session 2 Introductions/Conclusions

Speech #1

Session 3 Verbal and non-verbal delivery

Session 4 Visual aids

Speech #2

Session 5 Using research and citing sources

Session 6 Language Use

Speech #3

Session 7 Audience adaptation

Session 8 Final review

Speech #4--Showcase performance

Instructor:

Ms. Ruth Kay has been teaching public speaking and debate to students in grades 6-12, in both private and public schools, for over 35 years. The last 23 years have been at Detroit Country Day School. She has coached students in competitive speech activities for contests at the state, regional, and national level, with numerous state championships and national qualifiers. In addition, she has won state and national teaching/coaching awards including: Michigan Speech Coaches-Coach of the Year and Hall of Fame inductee, the National Communication Association Outstanding K-12 Teaching Award, and the National Federation of State High School Associations Citation Award for contributions to high school speech activities. She is a member of the executive board for both the Michigan Speech Coaches Association and the Michigan Interscholastic Forensic Association.

English Debate - High School (Grade 9~12) (Time: Thursday 7:00~8:30PM)

The skills of persuasive argument are extremely valuable. A brief examination of debate on social media will show how this skill is lacking in much of our population. Often, debate is viewed as a negative use of argument where someone "loses" and feelings are hurt. But debate can be a positive experience that allows individuals to examine issues from all sides and consider positions and information they may not have previously explored. In order to be effective, debate needs to be constructive and have the support of solid reasoning. This class will teach how to prepare and present arguments for clear and productive debate. The class will cover basic presentational skills in addition to the persuasive argument and logical reasoning. The skills learned in class will allow students not only to become better at logical and persuasive argument, but they will provide students the skills to transition to academic debate competitions should their school offer such opportunities.

Syllabus (tentative)

Session 1 Introduction

Dealing with nerves

Session 2 Basic presentational techniques

Debate #1

Session 3 Structure of an argument

Clash in debate

Session 4 Language of persuasion part 1

Debate #2

Session 5 Language of persuasion part 2

Introduction to persuasive reasoning

Session 6 Fallacies of reasoning part 1

Debate #3

Session 7 Fallacies of reasoning part 2

Session 8 Final review

Debate #4 Final showcase debate

Instructor:

Ms. Ruth Kay has been teaching public speaking and debate to students in grades 6-12, in both private and public schools, for over 35 years. The last 23 years have been at Detroit Country Day School. She has coached students in competitive speech activities for contests at the state, regional, and national level, with numerous state championships and national qualifiers. In addition, she has won state and national teaching/coaching awards including: Michigan Speech Coaches-Coach of the Year and Hall of Fame inductee, the National Communication Association Outstanding K-12 Teaching Award, and the National Federation of State High School Associations Citation Award for contributions to high school speech activities. She is a member of the executive board for both the Michigan Speech Coaches Association and the Michigan Interscholastic Forensic Association.

Computer Programing - Learning how to code at a young age can truly set up your child for a lifetime of success

Python I (Grade 5~6) (Time: Sunday 7:00~9:00PM)

Course Objective: This course will introduce students to the Python programming language. The knowledge gained from this course can also be used to learn most programming languages.

Requirements: This course is designed for beginners with no prior programming experience. A laptop capable of running Python is required for this course. To check if your laptop can run Python, download Python from https://www.python.org/downloads/. This course will be taught over Zoom. There are weekly homework assignments and a final project.

Links for downloading:

https://www.python.org/downloads/

Online resources:

https://www.homeandlearn.uk/

https://www.learnpython.org/

Class schedule:

Week 1: Introduction, syntax, user input, variables

Week 2: Lists, Dictionaries

Week 3: Loops, Control flow

Week 4: Functions

Week 5: Review

Week 6: String Manipulation

Week 7: Advanced features, introduction to the final project

Week 8: Review / advanced features

Week 9: Final project presentation

Instructors biography:
The instructors for this course will be Om Joshi and Vijay Daita

Om Joshi is a sophomore at International Academy Central in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. He was a member of the 2017-2018 Mechanical Monkeys Robotics team that ranked 7th at the 2020 FIRST National Championship. He also has been a part of the Mechanical Monkeys Robotics team that ranked 3rd Place for the Control Award (Programming Award), 1st Place and 2nd Place in the years 2017, 2018, 2019 respectively at the FIRST Michigan State Championship. In addition, he is an AIME Qualifier, won and participated in numerous hackathons, the founder of a charitable organization teaching students how to code and an award-winning application developer. Today, he develops and actively maintains the website of Detroit Education Society, Michigan Indian Community Service organization and develops mobile applications for organizations as well as for the greater good.

Vijay Daita is an Android Associate Developer and obtained his Certification at age 13. He is currently a sophomore at Bloomfield Hills High School. He is proficient in Python, Java and Vue.js. Vijay is also a volunteer at CoronaWhy and other organizations. He is a cofounder and co-president of Todocode. He also works with Retevide, PoCovidScreen and Voicemed in an effort to find better solutions for COVID-19 detection. His primary interests currently are AI applications in Medicine, especially imaging.

Both instructors taught the Python Programming course in the summer of 2019 and Spring of 2020.

Python II (Grade 6~7) (Time: Monday 7:00~9:00PM)

Course Objective: This course will give students a good understanding of the Python programming language. Python is easy to learn and easy to understand. The knowledge gained from this class can be used to learn practically any type of coding with any other programming language.

Requirements: A laptop capable of running Python, Wing IDE, and Zoom is required. This course is designed for beginners’ students who have attended Summer session Python course, or students who have Python experiences. No textbooks will be used, but there are plenty of online resources that students can look at on their own. This course will be taught over Zoom. There will be weekly homework assignments and a final project.

Links for downloading:

https://www.python.org/downloads/

http://wingware.com/downloads/wing-101

Online resources:

https://www.homeandlearn.uk/

https://www.learnpython.org/

Class schedule:

Week 1: Introduction, syntax, user input, variables

Week 2: Drawing in Python with turtle graphics

Week 3: Functions, features in turtle graphics

Week 4: Control flow, random numbers

Week 5: Lists, dictionaries

Week 6: String manipulation

Week 7: Advanced features, introduction to the final project

Week 8: Review / advanced features

Week 9: Preview Recursion, Tree Recursion

Instructor biography: The instructor for this course will be Andrew Luo. Andrew Lou is a Freshman at UCLA, Computer Engineering. He has extensive Python and Java experiences. Andrew also was a High School Coding Club member and has four years of tutoring experience with students aging 7-18.

Programming with Scratch II (Grade 3~5) (Time: Wednesday 6:30~8:30PM)

The ability to code computer programs is an important part of literacy in today’s society. When people learn to code in Scratch, they learn important strategies for solving problems, designing projects, and communicating ideas. Scratch is designed especially for ages 8 to 16, but is used by people of all ages. Millions of people are creating Scratch projects in a wide variety of settings, including homes, schools, museums, libraries, and community centers.

This class is for students who have some experiences of Scratch, it is NOT going to be a repeat of Fall 2020 session. Teacher will adjust the contents of projects to accommodate all levels of students.

Teacher: Daniel Dong just graduated high school from Northville High School and am attending the University of Michigan learning computer science. Daniel taught and led kids in VBS that is really well liked by kids. Daniel taught Python class in summer 2019 in NCCAE. He is excited to be back and teach Scratch class this summer. In high school, he was the Varsity tennis captain and I also served as Co-President of our National Honors Society.

Java with Minecraft I (Grade 6~8) (Time: Tuesday 6:30~8:30PM)

Minecraft will focus on fundamental Java concepts like functions, conditionals, and objects by expressing such concepts in Minecraft--a game that many students already know and love. Using the Minecraft Forge API, students will learn the skills to generate structures, change game mechanics, write cheats, create minigames, or make any other modifications they can dream of. The possibilities are endless--expanded by students’ interest in video games, while restricted only by their creativity.

Course plan:
-Setting up the development environment
-Forge project structure overview
-Variables
-Functions
-Loops
-Conditionals
-Event handling
-Objects

Instructor: James Chen graduated from Novi High School 2020 and will be studying computer science this fall at the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering. James is the computer vision programming lead on his high school’s FIRST robotics team. The app, Allergy Compass, James built with a friend at MHacks 12 won the “Best Use of Google Cloud” award at the hackathon and the Congressional App Challenge in Michigan’s 11th Congressional district in 2019. James has been teaching Python I and II at MNCCS since summer 2019. He worked closely with parents to help kids to learn better in the classroom.

Mobile App Creation (Grade 6~9 ) (Time: Thursday 4:30~6:30PM)

Mobile App teaches mobile app design using MIT App Inventor. Apps written using this suite can only be run on Android phones and tablets, but students without Android device will be able to test their apps on the Android emulator installed on PC. Participants will learn how to utilize App Inventor’s user-friendly GUI designer and intuitive block-based programming, and will strengthen their understanding of programming concepts like conditional logic and intelligent interface design by applying this knowledge when designing their own apps. No prior programming experience is necessary.

Instructor: James Chen studies computer science at the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering. James is the computer vision programming lead on his high school’s FIRST robotics team. James has been teaching Python I and II at MNCCS since summer 2019. He worked closely with parents to help kids to learn better in the classroom.

The app, Allergy Compass, James built with a friend at MHacks 12 won the “Best Use of Google Cloud” award at the hackathon and the Congressional App Challenge in Michigan’s 11th Congressional district in 2019.

Arts and Design - To develop the skills, concepts, and sensitivities essential to the visual arts

Drawing, Painting and Design (Grade 1+) (Time: Saturday 1:00~2:30PM)

Drawing, painting & design will focus on the application and practice of hand-drawn & painted skills in design. No drawing and painting experience necessary. The teacher will adjust content based on age, level, and interest.

The class mainly teaches basic skills of hand drawing and painting to apply to real life and future design careers (architecture, advertising, fashion, products, etc.), including sketching, cartoons, watercolor(such as drawing characters, animals and still life, etc.). From learning how to observe, to hold a pencil and paint correctly, to learning perspective, shading, color theory, layout and composition, etc in design application, and simultaneously teaching elements of art and principles of design. We mainly aim to cultivate interests and hobbies, practice on how to be accurate, quickly draw designs for future related careers.

Instructor: Yanhong Ye

Ms. Ye obtained Master of Business Administration from University of San Francisco. She is the director of a licensed art studio. She has taught drawing and arts in MNCCS since 2019 and joined NCCAE in the summer of 2020 for "Drawing and painting".


Digital Drawing (Grade 5~8) (Time: Saturday 1:00~2:30PM)

This class will introduce the fundamental design concepts, methods, and practices of digital illustration design. The purpose of this class is to equip students with a new range of skills that allowing students to develop a design-thinking mindset.

The class focuses on growing student’s ability to work with digital tools, apps, and common techniques. There is an initial emphasis on sketching and shading using the graphic software Autodesk Sketchbook and digital art supplies. The principles of art and design will be explored through completing class assignments. Also, we will explore more design industry standard software, pinpoint what each one is good at and which ones are better at certain tasks than others.

In the end, students will be asked to create a digital design book, allowing them to use earlier works and demonstrate their understandings by creating digital products.

Instructor: Mi Tian

Mi has a Bachelor degree in Industrial Degree from Ohio State University and a Master of Fine Arts degree in Integrated Design from CCS. She has worked as the lead UX designer and product designer in both US and China. She has the expert knowledge in both fields of product design and UX design.

Chess - To lean thinking ahead, being patience and making the best choices to develop positive outcomes through the great game

Chess Beginner (All Grades) (Time: Monday 4:30~6:00PM)

NCCAE Chess class has consistently achieved impressive results in various local chess competitions. Children who love to play chess also want to continue sharpen their skills. Coach Joshua will continue to run the chess classes. This spring, Chess classes is focus for the beginner level. Coach will have one specific topic to cover and the students will have opportunities to compete with each other in a mini tournament on each class.

Children in beginner class do not require any previous knowledge of chess.

Coach:

Joshua Posthuma is 2018 and 2019 Michigan State Champion. He earned the NM title in Chicago at age 15, and earned the FM title by scoring 9/9 in the 2018 Michigan Invitational at age 18. I'm actively working towards the IM title.

Since graduating from West Ottawa High School in May of 2018, he has been making a living teaching chess lessons and has taught beginner, intermediate and advanced chess class in NCCAE and MNCCS since 2018.

AP Exam Prep

AP - US History (English) (Time: Wednesday 7:00~9:00PM)

This class will be held over 9 lessons leading up to the 2021 AP Exams in May. Specific plans

for each lesson are listed below, please contact aluo8170@gmail.com with any questions.


Week 1

Icebreaker Games, Textbook selection, begin Colonial Period review

Week 2

End Colonial Period and Begin Revolutionary Era, Introduction to Exam problem types

Week 3

Continue Revolutionary Era, Practice Short Answer Questions

Week 4

End Revolutionary Era, Begin Antebellum Period

Week 5

Civil War Review, Highlight Exam material, Post War Period

Week 6

Populism, The Two World Wars, Modern Period (Unfinished concepts in this lesson will be

continued in Week 7)

Week 7

Walkthrough Practice AP Exams 2013, 2014, 2015

Week 8

Walkthrough Practice AP Exams 2004, 2018, 2019

Week 9

Mock DBQ Section Exams (Feedback after class)

*Specific course material is subject to change based on student and teacher preference

Instructor:

Andrew 目前是UC Berkeley 大学 Computer Science专业。Andrew在高中期间完成10门AP课程的考试,每一门课程都获得满分 5 分的成绩。Andrew在高中期间也参加了 Physics,Math Level II,Chemistry 三门 SAT2 单一学科的考试, 都获得 满分 800分的成绩。Andrew在高中时,一直是学校 Peer Tutoring program的重要成员,每周都会安排 2-3 小时的固定时间来辅导本校的同学,解答各科的作业及其他学术问题。拥有丰富的辅导经验。

AP - US History (中文授课) (Time: 中国时间 Saturday 9:00~11:00AM)

This class will be held over 9 lessons leading up to the 2021 AP History Exams in May. Specific plans

for each lesson are listed below, please contact the instructor aluo8170@gmail.com with any questions.


Week 1

Icebreaker Games, Textbook selection, begin Colonial Period review

Week 2

End Colonial Period and Begin Revolutionary Era, Introduction to Exam problem types

Week 3

Continue Revolutionary Era, Practice Short Answer Questions

Week 4

End Revolutionary Era, Begin Antebellum Period

Week 5

Civil War Review, Highlight Exam material, Post War Period

Week 6

Populism, The Two World Wars, Modern Period (Unfinished concepts in this lesson will be

continued in Week 7)

Week 7

Walkthrough Practice AP Exams 2013, 2014, 2015

Week 8

Walkthrough Practice AP Exams 2004, 2018, 2019

Week 9

Mock DBQ Section Exams (Feedback after class)

*Specific course material is subject to change based on student and teacher preference

Instructor:

Andrew 目前是UC Berkeley 大学 Computer Science专业。Andrew在高中期间完成10门AP课程的考试,每一门课程都获得满分 5 分的成绩。Andrew在高中期间也参加了 Physics,Math Level II,Chemistry 三门 SAT2 单一学科的考试, 都获得 满分 800分的成绩。Andrew在高中时,一直是学校 Peer Tutoring program的重要成员,每周都会安排 2-3 小时的固定时间来辅导本校的同学,解答各科的作业及其他学术问题。拥有丰富的辅导经验。

AP - Computer Science A (Time: Saturday 2:00~4:00PM)

Book: Barron’s AP Computer Science A 9th edition

This is a tentative syllabus indicating the material to be covered. Sections may be lengthened or shortened according to students’ existing knowledge.

Week 1: Java Language Basics – Operators, types, variables, input/output

Week 2: Java Language Basics – Iteration, control structures, exceptions

Week 3: Object Oriented Programming

Week 4: Inheritance and Polymorphism

Week 5: Standard Classes

Week 6: Arrays and ArrayLists

Week 7: Recursion

Week 8: Program Design and Analysis

Week 9: Labs, Final Review, requested topics.

Instructor: James Chen studies computer science at the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering. James is the computer vision programming lead on his high school’s FIRST robotics team. James has been teaching Python I and II at MNCCS since summer 2019. He worked closely with parents to help kids to learn better in the classroom.

The app, Allergy Compass, James built with a friend at MHacks 12 won the “Best Use of Google Cloud” award at the hackathon and the Congressional App Challenge in Michigan’s 11th Congressional district in 2019.

AP - Calcs BC (Time: Tuesday 7:00~9:00PM)

This is a class geared towards preparation for the AP Calculus BC exam.

The exam contains a portion with multiple choice questions, and a portion with free response questions, in which all work must be shown. Strategies for both of these sections will be discussed, with an emphasis on practice problems. It is assumed that students already have a basic understanding of the material, so that the class will mostly focus on solving mid to high difficulty problems and filling in gaps of knowledge. Topics covered include limits, derivative computations, applications of derivatives, integral computations, applications of integration, and sequences and series.


Tentative Syllabus

The following is a tentative schedule for the AP Calculus BC preparation class. Topics can be shortened or lengthened based on student progress, popular student request, and difficulty evaluation.

Week 1 Functions and Limits: polynomials, trigonometry, exponents and logarithms, asymptotes, limit rules, continuity

Week 2 Differentiation: definition, chain rule, product and quotient rules, implicit differentiation, mean value theorem, lhospital’s rule, inverses

Week 3 Applications of differentiation: tangents and normals, extreme and inflection points, curve sketching, optimization, velocity and acceleration

Week 4 Integration: Basic formulas, substitutions, partial fractions, integration by parts, differential equations

Week 5 Definite integrals: fundamental theorem of calculus, Riemann sums, approximations, average value

Week 6 Applications of integration: area between curves, volume of solids, arc length, improper integrals, motion along curves

Week 7 Differential equations: definitions, slope fields, Euler’s method, first order equations, exponential and logistic growth

Week 8 Sequences and series: Convergence theorems, alternating series, Taylor and Maclaurin series, error bounds

Week 9 Final review and requested topics

Instructor: Jason Hu

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor,专注于电⽓⼯程。Jason 在高中成绩优异,参加的AP课程有:微积分 BC,物理学 C,物理电磁学 C,化学,统计,计算机科学 A。Jason的所有AP课考试成绩都是满分5 分。Jason 在业余时间连续四年在Ann Arbor Math Olympiad Club 直接给三15-20学的课程讲课,有着丰富的授课经验。Jason在高中期间三次考上美国数学奥林匹克竞赛(全国前250名),美国物理奥林匹克竞赛牌(全国前40名), 全州数学赛获得第名 (Michigan Math Prize Competition),并代表密歇根州数学团队参加全国数学竞赛,全国排名第9。

AP - Physics C: Mechanics (Time: Thursday 7:00~9:00PM)

This is a class geared towards preparation for the AP Physics C Mechanics exam.

The exam contains a portion with multiple choice questions, and a portion with free response questions, in which all work must be shown. Strategies for both of these sections will be discussed, with an emphasis on practice problems. It is assumed that students already have a basic understanding of the material, so that the class will mostly focus on solving mid to high difficulty problems and filling in gaps of knowledge. Topics covered include kinematics, Newton’s laws, energy properties, momentum properties, and rigid body motion, energy, and momentum.

Tentative Syllabus

The following is a tentative schedule for the AP Physics C: Mechanics preparation class. Topics can be shortened or lengthened based on student progress, popular student request, and difficulty evaluation.

Week 1 Kinematics: 1D and 2D motion and formulas

Week 2 Dynamics: Newton’s laws, free body diagrams, linear dynamics, circular motion, springs, tension

Week 3 Work and energy: definitions, computation of work, kinetic and gravitational energy, conservation of energy

Week 4 Center of mass and momentum: definitions, computations of center of mass, conservation of momentum in 1D and 2D

Week 5 Rotation 1: Torque, statics problems, angular acceleration and velocity

Week 6 Rotation 2: Angular momentum, energy, and its conservation, dynamics, unified problems

Week 7 Gravitation: forces and potential energy theorems, angular momentum properties, conservation laws

Week 8 Oscillations: differential equations, springs, pendulums and approximations, physical pendulums, simple harmonic motion

Week 9 Final review and requested topics


Instructor: Jason Hu,University of Michigan, Ann Arbor,专注于电⽓⼯程。Jason 在高中成绩优异,参加的AP课程有:微积分 BC,物理学 C,物理电磁学 C,化学,统计,计算机科学 A。Jason的所有AP课考试成绩都是满分5 分。Jason 在业余时间连续四年在Ann Arbor Math Olympiad Club 直接给三15-20学的课程讲课,有着丰富的授课经验。Jason在高中期间三次考上美国数学奥林匹克竞赛(全国前250名),美国物理奥林匹克竞赛牌(全国前40名), 全州数学赛获得第名 (Michigan Math Prize Competition),并代表密歇根州数学团队参加全国数学竞赛,全国排名第9。

AP - Statistics (Time: Monday 7:00~9:00PM)

Schedule:


The following is a schedule for the AP Statistics preparation class. Topics can be shortened or lengthened based on student progress, popular student request, and difficulty evaluation.

Week 1: Picturing Distributions with Graphs & Describing Distributions with Numbers

Week 2: Normal Distributions & Scatterplots and Correlations

Week 3: Regression, Producing Data – Sampling, & Producing Data - Experiments

Week 4: Introducing Probability & General Rules of Probability

Week 5: Binomial Distributions, Sampling Distributions, & Confidence Intervals – The Basics

Week 6: Tests of Significance – The Basics & Inference in Practice

Week 7: Inference About a Population Mean & Comparing Two Means

Week 8: Inference About a Population Proportion & Comparing Two Proportions

Week 9: Two Categorical Variables – The Chi-Squared Test & One Way Analysis of Variance – Comparing Several Means

Instructor: Dr. Ryan Nierman received his PhD in Applied Mathematical Sciences from Oakland University in 2017. He also holds a Bachelors of Science in both Computer Engineering and Engineering Mathematics from the University of Michigan - Dearborn, where he graduated with Honors. Ryan has seven years experience teaching mathematics courses at the university level and has served as a mentor for several students completing their senior seminar research. Ryan has a long history of success working with high school students. In addition to tutoring individuals in mathematics and computer-based courses, Ryan has also been involved in coaching high school debate for over 13 years

Math/Chess special semester: (January 2021 - June 2021)

we offer a special math/chess semester starts form January 2021. Pre-Algebra, Geometry and Chess will run for 22 weeks. MathCounts and AMC 10/12 will have 9 classes.


Chess Intermediate/Advanced (All Grades)

NCCAE Chess class has consistently achieved impressive results in various local chess competitions. Children who love to play chess also want to continue sharpen their skills. Coach Joshua will continue to run the chess classes. Chess classes are divided into primary, intermediate and advanced classes based on the level. Coach will have one specific topic to cover and the students will have opportunities to compete with each other in a mini tournament on each class.

There will be a placement test about one week before the semester.

Children in beginner class do not require any previous knowledge of chess.

Children in the intermediate and advanced classes need to have some chess knowledge and have at least one-year of experience playing chess.

Coach: Joshua Posthuma is 2018 and 2019 Michigan State Champion. He earned the NM title in Chicago at age 15, and earned the FM title by scoring 9/9 in the 2018 Michigan Invitational at age 18. I'm actively working towards the IM title.

Since graduating from West Ottawa High School in May of 2018, he has been making a living teaching chess lessons and has taught beginner and intermediate chess class in MNCCS since 2018.

Pre-Algebra (Grade 4~6)

Pre-Algebra is a transition course from elementary school arithmetic to middle school algebra. This course can help students to establish good mathematical thinking habits from the beginning, deepen the grasp of basic concepts and basic knowledge, and lay a solid foundation for mathematics learning throughout the middle school and high school period.

Course plan: This course needs a total of 22 lessons to cover the entire contents, starting from early January until mid-June. After completing this course, the student can continue to take Algebra-1 class in the following summer/fall session.

About the instructor:

PhD in engineering, working in area of engineering design, computation and analysis for automotive industry. He is passionate in mathematics and has been exploring school math for many years. He has unique insights into the system, characteristics and methods of school mathematics. He is enthusiastic about mathematics teaching, hoping to improve students' learning ability and mathematics level, and helping students to lay a solid foundation for future study.

The course will follow the structure in math text books published by McGraw-Hill.


Geometry (Grade 7~9)

Geometry is the best course for students to obtain systematic training on logical thinking in mathematics. Many students do not have a good chance to get proper training in logical reasoning at school. This course will teach students basic elements in Geometry, the properties and relationships among those elements. These elements include lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles and solid shapes. In addition to basic concepts in Geometry, logical reasoning will be emphasized during the progress. The course will also teach students how to prove a Geometric proposition in a formal way with reasons for each step. After this course, students will be well trained and prepared for high level math learning.


Course Plan: This course needs a total of 22 lessons to cover the entire contents, starting from early January until mid-June. After completing this course, the student can continue to take Algebra-2 class in the following summer/fall session.


About the instructor: PhD in engineering, working in the area of engineering design, computation and analysis for automotive industry. He is passionate about mathematics and has been exploring school math for many years. He has unique insights into the system, characteristics and methods of school mathematics. He is enthusiastic about mathematics teaching, hoping to improve students’ learning ability and mathematics level, and helping students to lay a solid foundation for future study.


The course will follow the structure in the math textbook published by McGraw-Hill.

MathCounts (Grade 6~8)

MathCounts is the most prestigious middle school math competition in the United States. Participants are students in grades 6-8 and organized by middle schools. Students participate at school, regional, and state level competitions, and eventually, each state forms a team of 4 players to participate in the national competition in May.

This course is helping students in 5-8 grades (in the 2020-2021 school year) to prepare for MathCounts Competition. Helping the students on problem solving strategies for MathCounts competitions. The content includes algebra, geometry, number theory, combination and probability. The teaching plan is as follows:

  1. Before the class, there will be a placement test, based on the results of the test, students will be arranged to different levels. The class size is around 10-15 students.

  2. Each week there will be 2 hours of online live session. Teachers will introduce various mathematical concepts (using Zoom), and explain the problem solving strategies using previous MathCounts questions. Recorded video will be provided after class.

  3. Homeworks will be assigned every week, typical time to complete the homework is about 2 hours. Students submit their answers before the next class. The teacher will explain selected homework questions in the following class.

  4. There will be one hour of online open office (Zoom meeting) every week, and the teacher can have one-on-one Q & A sessions with the students in this hour.

Instructors:

Jason Zhang, a rising 9th grader. Representing Michigan Mathcounts team in 2018,2019. Perfect score of 2019 AMC 8, 3 times AIME qualifiers; CMO qualifier.

Michael Lu, rising 8th grader, representing Michigan Mathcounts team in 2019, perfect score of 2019 AMC 8, two times AIME qualifiers. Jason and Michael have been teaching AMC 8 and Mathcount Competitions In 2020 summer.

AMC 10/12 (Grade 9~12)

AMC 10/12 (American Mathematics Contest), is a mathematical competition organized by the Mathematics Association of American, mainly for high school students (but middle school students can also participate). This is the first-level competition in selecting the US Math Olympiad team. Hundreds of thousands of students participate every year. Students who are grade 10 and below can participate in the AMC-10 exam, while the AMC-12 exam is open to all grades. Each year, the top 5,000 students at AMC-10/12 will advance to the next round test: AIME.

This course is targeted to the students who are in grades 7-10 in the 2020-2021 school year and want to participate in the AMC10/12 competition. The class will use AOPS (Art of Problem Solving) books as the textbook, and also use past AMC 10/12 questions. The course covers algebra, geometry, number theory, combination and probability.

  1. The class size is around 10-15 students.If number of participants is more than 15, students will be separated to different sessions.

  2. Each week there will be 2 hours of online live session. Teachers will use the textbook to introduce various mathematical concepts (using Zoom). Recorded video will be provided after class.

  3. Homeworks will be assigned every week, typical time to complete the homework is about 2 hours. Students submit their answers before next class. The teacher will explain selected homework questions in the following class.

  4. There will be one hour of online open office (Zoom meeting) every week, and the teacher can have one-on-one Q & A sessions with the students in this hour.

Instructor: Jason Hu is a sophomore in college with many years of experience in math competitions. In these contests, he has achieved multiple rewards, such as representing the Michigan team in national Mathcounts, qualifying for the USA Math Olympiad 3 times, and placing 2nd statewide in the Michigan Math Prize Competition. Jason was also a student teacher at the Ann Arbor Math Olympiad Club throughout the entirety of high school. During these years, he assisted and directly taught 6 classes, totaling over 300 hours of instruction.

Please contact Zhangjun Tang (ztang@nccae.org) for more information or any concern on the courses.