Science Talks

NASA scientists and researchers will share their research and more!


No tickets or registration are necessary. All Science Talks will be held in Holmes Hall C106

NASA scientists and education specialists are excited to share the excitement of their research and science, both in person and virtually.

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Wednesday

  • 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

in-person

Getting the Buzz about Mosquitoes! Dorian Janney, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Come learn about the worlds' most dangerous animal, and find out how NASA satellites help us predict, monitor, and respond to outbreaks of mosquito-transmitted disease. You will also learn how to become part of the solution to reducing the threat of mosquito-transmitted disease using the NASA sponsored GLOBE Observer "Mosquito Habitat Mapper" tool!

Wednesday

  • 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm

in-person

Viewing Earth from Space with Landsat Michael Taylor, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

This presentation will provide an overview of how NASA studies Earth's ecosystems from space. Find out what we have learned.

Wednesday

  • 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

in-person

Getting the Buzz about Mosquitoes! Dorian Janney, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Come learn about the worlds' most dangerous animal, and find out how NASA satellites help us predict, monitor, and respond to outbreaks of mosquito-transmitted disease. You will also learn how to become part of the solution to reducing the threat of mosquito-transmitted disease using the NASA sponsored GLOBE Observer "Mosquito Habitat Mapper" tool!

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Thursday

  • 9 am - 9:30 am

in-person

NASA Citizen Science Holli Kohl, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

In 1804, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark set out to map the vast Northwestern Territory recently added to the United States. How has the land changed since then? This summer, you can join NASA as a citizen scientist and help map the land around you with GLOBE Observer. The top map makers will win a prize package! Learn why scientists are interested in your observations of land cover, and why land cover is important to you. Land cover influences your risk from disasters like fires or floods. It provides habitat for wildlife and food for us. Land cover is changing all the time, so scientists are working to find ways to understand the change. You can help by documenting what is on the land.

Thursday

  • 11 am - 11:30 am

virtual

NASA Trees Brian Campbell, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Wallops Flight Facility

Trees are vital to our environment. Tree Height is the number one indicator of how well an ecosystem can grow trees. NASA has a mission, called the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2), that measures Earth’s tree heights from space. Now, through the GLOBE Program and the NASA Globe Observer (NASA GO) citizen science app, students and observers can measure the height of trees with either a hand-held clinometer or simply a mobile device. Learn all about how you can measure tree height measurements through NASA GO and the Trees Around the GLOBE Student Research Campaign and compare your data to that of ICESat-2.

Thursday

  • 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

in-person

Viewing Earth from Space with Landsat Michael Taylor, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

This presentation will provide an overview of how NASA studies Earth's ecosystems from space. Find out what we have learned.

Thursday

  • 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm

in-person

NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Mission Dorian Janney, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

GPM: Celebrating 5 Years of Success!

Thursday

  • 3:00 pm - 3:30 pm

in-person

Viewing Earth from Space with Landsat Michael Taylor, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

This presentation will provide an overview of how NASA studies Earth's ecosystems from space. Find out what we have learned.

Friday, May 24, 2019

Friday

  • 9:00 am - 9:30am

virtual

Clouds Impact on Earth's Energy Budget Jessica Taylor, NASA/Langley Research Center

At any point in time, over 70% of the Earth is covered by clouds. Clouds play an important role in weather and regulating Earth’s temperature. Some clouds help cool the Earth while others warm it, so NASA scientists investigate clouds by type, height, and optical properties. Come learn about how scientists study clouds and how you can help contribute your own citizen science data to NASA

Friday

  • 9:30 am - 10:00am

virtual

Clouds Impact on Earth's Energy Budget Jessica Taylor, NASA/Langley Research Center

At any point in time, over 70% of the Earth is covered by clouds. Clouds play an important role in weather and regulating Earth’s temperature. Some clouds help cool the Earth while others warm it, so NASA scientists investigate clouds by type, height, and optical properties. Come learn about how scientists study clouds and how you can help contribute your own citizen science data to NASA

Friday

  • 10:00 am - 10:30am

virtual

Science behind the Music, Mark Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center


Friday

  • 10:30 am - 11:00am

in-person


NASA Goddard, Earth Science and the GLOBE Observer project, Trena Ferrell, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Earth Sciences and Education NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is home to the nation's largest organization of scientists, engineers, and technologists who build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study Earth, the sun, our solar system and the universe.

Come and learn about NASA and the GLOBE Observer project!


Friday

  • 12 pm - 12:30 pm

in-person

NASA Citizen Science Holli Kohl, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

In 1804, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark set out to map the vast Northwestern Territory recently added to the United States. How has the land changed since then? This summer, you can join NASA as a citizen scientist and help map the land around you with GLOBE Observer. The top map makers will win a prize package! Learn why scientists are interested in your observations of land cover, and why land cover is important to you. Land cover influences your risk from disasters like fires or floods. It provides habitat for wildlife and food for us. Land cover is changing all the time, so scientists are working to find ways to understand the change. You can help by documenting what is on the land.