AP Literature & Composition

Course Materials - Access the syllabus, overview of the AP curriculum, and practice tests.

Google Classroom - This is where you will upload most assignments for this course.

Turnitin - This is where you will upload some final assignments for this course.

Class Tues 2/12 - Thurs 2/11; HW due Wed 2/13 & Thurs 2/14

This class dropped on Monday.

Tuesday was a snow day - NO SCHOOL!

On Wednesday, we conducted a peer review session for the Heart of Darkness thesis statements.

On Thursday, we had a peer review session for the Heart of Darkness topic sentences and quotes choices. Then, we spent time on our Heart of Darkness outlines/drafts.

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Due Thursday:

  • By class time:
    • Finish giving thesis statement feedback to your second peer (whoever was sitting to your right in class Wednesday)
    • Come to class prepared with an outline that includes, at minimum, the following elements:
  1. A (revised) thesis that includes a counterclaim.
  2. Topic sentences that use complex sentence structure to establish relationships between ideas.
  3. Quote choices from both texts with proper citation (author's last name pg#) Ex. (Conrad 102).
  • By 10:00PM: Revise your thesis statement, topic sentences, and quote choices as determined through Wednesday's peer review session. Then, add bullet notes beneath each of your quotes to indicate how you will use the language in the to prove an idea The more complete your bullet notes, the more detailed will be Ms. Hernberg's feedback.

Homework Over Break: Ms. Hernberg will give outline feedback over break. Although there is no official homework, Ms. Hernberg strongly recommends that you do some AP exam practice over break:

Class Mon 2/04 - Fri 2/08; HW due Tues 2/05 - Tues 2/12

On Monday, we continued our discussions on whether or not Heart of Darkness is a racist book using Achebe's "An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's 'Heart of Darkness'" as a lens. We also reviewed xx-xv of Walker's forward to the novella and spent ten minutes composing an initial response to Achebe to prepare for our discussions.

On Tuesday, we discussed the character of the Russian through the wider context of imperialism. We also did a group activity to explore the initial characterization of Kurtz.

On Wednesday, we continued our group activity to explore the characterization of Kurtz. We also discussed the significance of the hearts/hell imagery in the beginning of Section 3.

On Thursday, we conducted a close reading of the "tribal woman" characterization and created visual representations using only Conrad's words. We used these visual representations to continue our discussions from last Friday and Monday.

On Friday, we had our final discussion of Heart of Darkness. Ms. Hernberg also introduced the Heart of Darkness essay.

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Due Tuesday: Finish reading Section 2 of Heart of Darkness (through page 82). As you read, use the following questions to guide your notes:

  • What is the symbolic significance of Marlow's description of the Russian?
  • How is Mr. Kurtz characterized?

Due Wednesday: Read the first half of Section 3 of Heart of Darkness (through page 100). As you read:

  • Take individual notes on Kurtz's continued character development.
  • Add to your group's chart with examples of "hearts" and "hell" imagery.

Due Thursday: Finish reading Heart of Darkness (through p.117). As you read, use the following prompts to guide your notes:

  • Reflect on Marlow's conversation with Kurtz's Intended. How is her understanding of Kurtz an example of dramatic irony?
  • Reflect on Kurtz's last words. Did he realize something about himself? The Dark Continent? His methodology? Humanity in general?
  • Is Heart of Darkness racist? Does the book present a simple and degrading view of the native Africans? Or are Conrad's views of race more complex?
  • What ideas does Conrad suggest about colonialism through this novel?

Due Friday: Re-read Achebe's "An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's 'Heart of Darkness.'" Then, compose a reflection that integrates evidence from both the essay and the novel: Is Chinua Achebe right—is Heart of Darkness racist? Does the book present a simple and degrading view of the native Africans? Or are the views of race more complex? To what extent do you agree/disagree with Achebe's assertions?

Due Tuesday: Compose a draft thesis statement for the Heart of Darkness essay. This thesis statement must include a counterclaim.

Class Mon 1/28 - Fri 2/01; HW due Tues 1/29 - Mon 2/04

On Monday, we began discussing the first half of Section I of Heart of Darkness (through page 21). We focused our discussion on Marlow's account of early explorers and on the questions we took notes on over the weekend.

On Tuesday, we discussed hearts and hell imagery in Section I of Heart of Darkness. We used this discussion to discover emerging themes in the novella. Then, we conducted a close reading of the Grove of Death scene (p. 23-25).

This class dropped on Wednesday.

On Thursday, we read an excerpt from Miner's "Body Ritual Among the Nacirema" to examine how language can be used to dehumanize and "other." Then, we re-read the "Grove of Death" scene while consciously attempting to adopt the lens of Marlow's "black shadows of disease and starvation."

On Friday, we discussed the "Grove of Death" scene in detail. Then, we began a whole-class discussion on whether or not Heart of Darkness (which we've read through page 70) is a racist book.

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Due Tuesday: Finish reading Section 1 of Heart of Darkness (through page 45). Add quotes to your group’s Google Doc on hearts and hell imagery. Consider how this imagery is being used to develop a larger theme(s) in the novella.

Due Thursday: Finish the close reading activity and response to the "Grove of Death" scene (p. 23-25).

Due Friday:

  • Read the first half of Section 2 of Heart of Darkness (through page 70). As you read, use the following prompt to guide your notes: In his narrative, Marlow gives detailed descriptions of his encounters with Africans. Some critics have used these descriptions to condemn Heart of Darkness as a racist book. Using the book as a guide, consider whether you think that the book is more critical of the Africans or the white characters. In your notes, write down three or four reasons to support your decision. Submit these notes to Google Classroom.
  • If you wish, you may revise, add to, or insert comments to yesterday's homework response to the "Grove of Death" scene, then re-submit.

Due Monday: Read Achebe's "An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's 'Heart of Darkness.'" As you read, consider how Achebe's view might inform or contradict your own.

Class Thurs 1/24 & Fri 1/25; HW due Fri 1/25 & Mon 1/28

On Thursday, we collected any outstanding book copies from last semester. We also began pre-reading activities for Conrad's Heart of Darkness. We read and discussed a summary on "The Scramble for Africa," then began reading and discussing Kipling's poem "The White Man's Burden."

On Friday, we discussed "The White Man's Burden" and the response poems "The Poor Man's Burden," "The Black Man's Burden," and "The Real'White Man's Burden.'"

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Due Friday: Read/annotate all four poems in the packet for "The White Man's Burden" (available on Google Classroom). As you read, take notes on questions 1 - 6 to prepare for our discussions Friday.

Due Monday: Read the first half of Section I of Heart of Darkness (through page 21). As you read, take notes on:

  • What are Marlow’s thoughts on colonialism in Africa?
  • How does Conrad use light vs. dark imagery in this first section - what does the darkness represent? The light?
  • How is the role of women introduced in the early stages of the text?

Class Mon 1/14 - Wed 1/16; Poetry Reading Portfolio due Wed 1/16; Midterm Exam Tues 1/22

On Monday, we reviewed the poetry vocabulary quiz. We also continued learning about blank verse.

On Tuesday, we learned about the sestina form. We also conducted a focused peer review session on one of our Poetry Reading Portfolio pieces.

Wednesday was a review day for the midterm exam.

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Due Wednesday January 16: Submit your Poetry Reading Portfolio to Turnitin. This portfolio should include:

  • Reading Portfolio 3, Poetry 1: Written response to a winter poem
  • Reading Portfolio 3, Poetry 2: Written response to a choice poem
  • Revised sonnet with reflection connecting craft to purpose (3-5 main points)
  • Revised ode with reflection connecting craft to purpose (3-5 main points)
  • Revised villanelle with reflection connecting craft to purpose (3-5 main points)

The midterm exam will take place on Tuesday, January 22 at 10:00AM.

Class Mon 1/07 - Thurs 1/10; HW due Tues 1/08 - Thurs 1/10; Poetry Reading Portfolio due Wed 1/16

On Monday, we shared our villanelle drafts and discussed Elizabeth Bishop's "One Art." Then, we learned about the elegy form and read and discussed Walt Whitman's "O Captain! My Captain!"

On Monday, we shared our responses to Reading Portfolio 3, Poetry 2. Then, we did a practice multiple choice poetry assessment, followed by a debrief to discuss strategies. Finally, we reviewed key poetry vocabulary.

On Wednesday, we took a poetry vocabulary quiz. We also learned about blank verse and spent some time revising any one of our three drafted poems (sonnet, villanelle, ode) for our Poetry Reading Portfolio.

On Thursday, we took a practice AP written response.

This class dropped on Friday.

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Due Tuesday: Reading Portfolio 3, Poetry 2

Due Wednesday: Review the poetry vocabulary and prepare for a quiz.

Due Thursday: We will have a practice AP written response on Thursday.

Due Wednesday January 16: Submit your Poetry Reading Portfolio to Turnitin. This portfolio should include:

  • Reading Portfolio 3, Poetry 1: Written response to a winter poem
  • Reading Portfolio 3, Poetry 2: Written response to a choice poem
  • Revised sonnet with reflection connecting craft to purpose (3-5 main points)
  • Revised ode with reflection connecting craft to purpose (3-5 main points)
  • Revised villanelle with reflection connecting craft to purpose (3-5 main points)

The midterm exam is Tuesday, January 22.

Class Wed 1/02 - Fri 1/04; HW due Thurs 1/03 - Mon 1/07

On Wednesday, we shared our sonnets and spent some time peer-editing the meter and rhyme of one quatrain, couplet, octave, or sestet. We then watched and discussed three examples of spoken word poetry ("Shake the Dust" by Anis Mojgani, "Teeth" by Phil Kaye, and "Perfect" by Maia Mayor). Finally, we reviewed and discussed the ode form using Pablo Neruda's "Ode to My Socks" as an example.

On Thursday, we shared our ode drafts and read and discussed more of Pablo Neruda's odes.

On Friday, we shared our revised ode drafts, then learned about the villanelle form and began writing our own villanelles.

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Due Thursday:

  • Revise your sonnet.
  • Review the description of the ode form. Then, compose an ode of your own!

Due Friday: Revise your ode!

Due Monday:

  • Conduct a close reading (all three reads) of Elizabeth Bishop's "One Art." Come to class with a detailed annotation of the poem.
  • Review the description of the villanelle form. Then, compose a villanelle of your own using the graphic organizer.

Class Mon 12/17 - Thurs 12/20; HW due Wed 12/19 - Wed 1/02; Final Draft due Wed 12/19

On Monday, we reviewed poetry unit and poetry portfolio guidelines. We shared our annotations/notes on “The Sounds of Poetry” and worked together to analyze John Keats's "On the Grasshopper and Cricket."

Tuesday was a work day for the Pride & Prejudice thesis essay or the poetry portfolio response on one of the "Winter Poems."

On Wednesday and Thursday, we continued discussing John Keats's "On the Grasshopper and Cricket." On Thursday, we also did a paired activity to play with sound devices and review the sonnet form.

This class dropped on Friday.

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Due Wednesday 12/19 by 10:00PM: The final draft of your Pride and Prejudice essay is due to Turnitin by this time.

Due Wednesday 1/02: Review the instructions on Shakespearean and Petrarchan sonnets (available on Google Classroom). Then, compose a sonnet of your own!

Class Mon 12/10 - Fri 12/14; HW due Thurs 12/13 - Mon 12/17; Portfolio due Fri 12/14; Final Draft due Wed 12/19

On Monday, we spent some time getting in the poetry spirit by reading poems from Ms. Hernberg's personal collection. We also practiced the poetic terms we reviewed from Mary Oliver's A Poetry Handbook last week by analyzing Marcus Jackson's poem "First Warm Morning, Amsterdam Avenue."

This class dropped on Tuesday.

On Wednesday, we reviewed Mr. McAteer's "5 Inviolate Rules of Poetry" and used those rules to critique Mr. Darken's purposefully terrible poem. We then reviewed the "Critical Reading and Writing" handout (available on Google Classroom) and practiced the re-reading strategy on the handout with Robert Friend's "My Cup." We also conducted a first reading of Yusef Komunyakaa's "Facing It" and reviewed denotation/connotation.

On Thursday, we read some more poems from Ms. Hernberg's collection; we reflected on a particular poem or line that we liked or that spoke to us, and on why it spoke to us. We then continued our discussions of "Facing It" and denotation/connotation and conducted a first reading of Seamus Heaney's "Digging."

On Friday, we began with a whole-class discussion of "Facing It," then transitioned into a discussion of "Digging."

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Due Thursday: Conduct a second reading of "Facing It," annotating for connotative language.

Due Friday:

  • By Class Time: Conduct a second reading of "Digging," annotating for movement through space/time and the organization of ideas/images.
  • By 10:00PM: Your final, holistic comedy reading portfolio (with four entries) is due to Turnitin by this time.

Due Monday: Read and annotate the chapter on “The Sounds of Poetry” handed out in class on Friday (also available on Google Classroom). Take notes on the difference devices using the note-taking sheet.

Due Wednesday 12/19 by 10:00pM: The final draft of your Pride and Prejudice essay is due to Turnitin by this time.

Class Mon 12/03 - Thurs 12/06; HW due Tues 12/04 - Thurs 12/06

On Monday, we reviewed poetic terms from Mary Oliver's A Poetry Handbook to prepare for our upcoming poetry unit: scansion, alliteration, consonance, assonance, onomatopoeia, metrical foot (monometer, dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, alexandrine, heptameter, octameter, iamb, trochee, dactyl, anapest, spondee), couplet,terza rima, tercet/triplet, quatrain, Spenserian stanza, Italian sonnet, English/Shakespearean sonnet, blank verse, figurative language (simile, metaphor, extended metaphor, conceit, personification, allusion). We also met in our peer review group to discuss progress with our Pride and Prejudice thesis essays.

On Tuesday, we read, discussed, and reflected on Jorge Luis Borges's speech "The Riddle of Poetry." We will come back to this speech later this week to discuss Borges's thesis and main points. We also did a read-through of our drafted introductions.

On Wednesday, we first conducted a formal peer review of our introductions. For the rest of class, peer review groups had a choice between using the period to continue writing/revising, or starting the peer review process for a selected body paragraph (which may or may not be the same paragraph submitted to Ms. Hernberg for feedback by the end of class).

After reviewing Ms. Hernberg's thesis statement and body paragraph feedback at the beginning of class, we spent the remainder of class Thursday in a formal peer review session. This session was focused on:

  1. Flow of argument/line of inquiry
  2. Choose ONE body paragraph (which may or may not be the same paragraph submitted to Ms. Hernberg for feedback); focus on quote integration, analysis, and flow of ideas/language.

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Due Tuesday:

  • Revise your thesis statement based on Ms. Hernberg's feedback.
  • Draft your introduction and one body paragraph.

Due Wednesday: Compose one additional body paragraph. Be aware that at the end of class Wednesday, you will submit your revised thesis statement and one fully drafted and polished body paragraph to Ms. Hernberg for feedback.

Due Thursday:

  • Compose one additional body paragraph, OR polish the body paragraphs you already have.
  • Compose your concluding paragraph.

Due Friday 10/14 by 10:00PM: Your final, holistic comedy reading portfolio (with four entries) is due to Turnitin by this time.

Class Mon 11/26 - Fri 11/30; HW due Tues 11/27 - Fri 11/30

On Monday, we watched and discussed the Crash Course analysis of Pride and Prejudice.

On Tuesday, we discussed the tension in the final scene between Lady Catherine and Elizabeth. We also learned about antithesis and the various types of irony, and began our final discussions of the book.

On Wednesday, we had a roundtable discussion about the book. We spent the remainder of the period drafting and refining our thesis statements.

This class dropped on Thursday.

On Friday, we had a vocabulary quiz on the comedy unit. We also submitted the first drafts of our thesis statements and had our first informal peer conversation about our thesis papers.

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Due Tuesday and Wednesday:

  • Prepare for our discussions of Pride and Prejudice by reviewing the discussion questions spreadsheet. Feel free to add new discussion questions using the form sent to your email last week.
  • Begin thinking about what you'd like to argue for the thesis essay. Check out the unit overview on Google Classroom for a place to start.

Due Friday:

  • Study for the comedy unit vocabulary quiz.
  • Come to class with a drafted thesis statement for the Pride and Prejudice thesis essay.

Due Monday:

  • Collect evidence (including page numbers) for your thesis essay.
  • Draft your "so what."
  • OPTIONAL: Ms. Hernberg emailed you feedback on your thesis statements on Friday afternoon. If you get a chance, have a look at that feedback and begin making revisions!

Class Mon 11/19 - Wed 11/21; HW due Wed 11/21

On Monday, we brainstormed open-ended discussion questions for Pride and Prejudice in preparation for our final discussion.

On Tuesday, we took a multiple choice quiz on Pride and Prejudice. The quiz items were based on AP-style items. We also did some AP vocabulary practice.

On Wednesday, we reviewed our scores on our first practice response question and on the multiple choice quiz; we discussed AP test-taking tactics and time management. We did a close reading of an excerpt from Pride and Prejudice and discussed how we might plan to write an AP-style response to that excerpt.

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Due Wednesday: Reading Portfolio 2, Comedy 4.

There is no official homework over Thanksgiving Break; please enjoy your time to rest and be with your family! Be aware that we will begin our week upon our return to school with 1) a practice AP response to Pride and Prejudice and 2) beginning our thesis essay drafts. Additionally, if you have extra time over the break and are just itching for some AP practice, the College Board website has some great resources.

Class Mon 11/12 - Fri 11/16; HW due Tues 11/13 - Mon 11/19

On Monday, we discussed the Lady Catherine scenes, focusing on the intersection between pride, prejudice, and class.

On Tuesday, we discussed our literary criticism articles and began work on Reading Portfolio 2, Comedy 3.

We began class on Wednesday with a five-minute vocabulary warmup using freerice.com. Then, we did a quote analysis exercise on chapters 46-50 of Pride and Prejudice.

This class dropped on Thursday.

On Friday, we discussed the fools and foils (Mrs. Bennett, Lydia Bennett, Mr. Wickham) in chapters 46-55:

  • How does Austen continue to develop Mrs. Bennet as a fool? Lydia?
  • How is she using these fool characters to satirize her society?
  • How does Austen continue to develop Wickham as a foil for Mr. Darcy?
  • How does Austen continue to develop Lydia as a foil for Elizabeth?
  • How does Elizabeth’s reaction to Lydia’s marriage gives us insight into Elizabeth’s character? How does Austen use these foil pairings to provide social commentary, especially with respect to what makes a good marriage?

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Due Tuesday: Annotate your selected literary criticism article for the writer's line of inquiry. Be aware that these notes will help guide your next reading portfolio response.

Due Wednesday: Read chapters 46-50 of Pride and Prejudice.

Due Friday:

  • Reading Portfolio 2, Comedy 3.
  • Read chapters 51-55 of Pride and Prejudice.

Due Monday: Finish reading Pride and Prejudice.

Class Mon 11/05 - Fri 11/09; HW due Wed 11/07 - Fri 11/09

On Monday, we reviewed Michael Hauge's "Six Stage Plot Structure." We discussed whether and how Pride and Prejudice follows these stages, in particularly focusing on the placement of Darcy's proposal to Elizabeth.

Tuesday was Election Day - No School.

On Wednesday, we began charting Elizabeth's changing feelings toward Darcy, focusing on chapters 36-40.

On Thursday, we created, presented on, and discussed graphic representations of Elizabeth's changing feelings toward Darcy.

On Friday, we discussed our ideas for Reading Portfolio 2, Comedy 2, then began drafting.

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Due Wednesday: Read chapters 35-41 of Pride and Prejudice.

Due Thursday: Read chapters 42-45 of Pride and Prejudice.

Due Friday: Reading Portfolio 2, Comedy 2 - find quotes and outline!

Due Monday:

  • Reading Portfolio 2, Comedy 2.
  • We will begin Monday with a discussion of the following questions on chapter 42-45. Please prepare to discuss one:
    1. How does the author continue to develop Elizabeth’s changing attitudes towards Darcy in these chapters?
    2. Why do Elizabeth and Jane decide not to expose Wickham’s true nature to their friends and acquaintances?
    3. Why is Elizabeth upset that Lydia wants to go to Brighton? Why does she ask her father not to let her go?

Class Mon 10/29 - Thurs 11/01; HW due Tues 10/30 - Mon 11/05; Project due Thurs 11/01; Final Draft due Fri 11/02

On Monday, we had time to peer review and revise the tragedy thesis essay.

Tuesday was a work day for our satire projects and tragedy thesis essay.

On Wednesday, we got started with Portfolio 2, Comedy 1 (outlined and discussed). We also read and began discussing chapters 31 and 32 of Pride and Prejudice. We focused our discussion on how does Austen continues to develop the idea that Darcy is shy and reserved, and that these personality traits may help to explain his behavior at the Netherfield Ball. We also looked for evidence that Darcy has feelings for Elizabeth, and examined how Lady Catherine is introduced.

On Thursday, we watched and reflected on our satire films.

This class dropped on Friday.

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Due Tuesday: Read chapters 29-30 of Pride and Prejudice.

Due Thursday:

  • Satire Project (film + writeup).
  • Read chapters 33 and 34 of Pride and Prejudice.

Due Friday by 10:00PM: The final draft of your tragedy essay is due to Turnitin by this time. NOTE: If you are going to have trouble making this deadline due to college application deadlines, please let me know in advance; I may be able to grant you a short extension.

Due Monday November 5: Reading Portfolio 2, Comedy 1.

Class Mon 10/22 - Fri 10/26; Portfolio due Mon 10/22; HW due Wed 10/24 - Fri 10/25; Project due Thurs 11/01; Final Draft due Fri 11/02

On Monday, we discussed the function of Mr. Wickham's character in Pride and Prejudice, particularly with regards to his role as a foil to Mr. Darcy. We also had time to work on the satire project.

This class dropped on Tuesday.

On Wednesday, we analyzed the scenes with Mr. Collins in chapters 19 and 20. We also spent some time on the satire project.

On Thursday, we had some more time to work on the satire project. We also analyzed character foils to Darcy and Elizabeth through chapter 25.

On Friday, we did an activity on sentence combining and eliminating wordiness. We also continued discussing Pride and Prejudice through chapter 28.

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Due Monday by 10:00PM: Submit your finalized Tragedy Reading Portfolio to Turnitin.

Due Wednesday: Read chapters 19-20 of Pride and Prejudice.

Due Thursday: Read chapters 21-25 of Pride and Prejudice.

Due Friday: Read chapters 26-28 of Pride and Prejudice.

Due Thursday November 1: Satire Project (film + writeup).

Due Friday November 2 by 10:00PM: The final draft of your tragedy essay is due to Turnitin by this time. NOTE: If you are going to have trouble making this deadline due to college application deadlines, please let me know in advance; I may be able to grant you a short extension.

Class Mon 10/15 - Fri 10/19; Rough Draft due Mon 10/15; HW due Wed 10/17 - Fri 10/19; Portfolio due Mon 10/22

On Monday, we reviewed a resource on body paragraphs. We also examined the overview sheet and vocabulary list for the comedy unit. We discussed conventions of romantic comedies and read/began discussing the first two chapters of Pride and Prejudice.

On Tuesday, we reviewed Ms. Hernberg's feedback on Tragedy Reading Portfolio entry #4, a fiction reading portfolio entry. We then continued our discussions of Pride and Prejudice chapters 1 and 2, focusing on the development of theme. Then, we continued reading Pride and Prejudice through chapter 5, focusing on how Austen establishes pride as an obstacle for Darcy and Elizabeth early on.

On Wednesday, we continued our discussions of pride and other unfolding topics/motifs/themes through chapter 10. We also analyzed the characterization of Mr. Darcy; we examined his actions, how others view those actions/his personality, and alternate explanations for his actions.

On Thursday, we interpreted Pride and Prejudice through the social hierarchy during England's Regency Period. We also continued our discussions of Mrs. Bennett, focusing how how her characterization contributes to unfolding themes in the book. Finally, we examined the definition of satire and reviewed some key vocabulary terms.

On Friday, we took a multiple choice quiz on Pride and Prejudice. The quiz items were based on AP-style items. We also introduced and began work on the group project.

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Due Monday by 10:00PM: Submit your full, polished rough draft of your thesis essay to Google Classroom.

Due Wednesday:

  • Review Ms. Hernberg's feedback on "Reading Portfolio 1, Tragedy 4." Make a revision plan for Tragedy 3, Tragedy 4, and Tragedy 5 (all fiction entries).
  • Read chapters 6-10 of Pride and Prejudice. Continue to annotate for character development and the development of major themes.
  • Bring your Pride and Prejudice background/intro packet to class.

Due Thursday:

  • Read chapters 11-15 of Pride and Prejudice.
  • If you have not yet done so, read the background information packet on Pride and Prejudice. Come to class prepared to discuss:
    • Where do the families we’ve met so far (the Bennets, the Lucases, the Bingleys, and Mr. Darcy) fall in the social hierarchy?
    • Where is there evidence that social class is an obstacle between Darcy and Elizabeth’s relationship?

Due Friday:

  • Read chapters 16-18 of Pride and Prejudice.
  • We will have a multiple-choice quiz on some section through chapter 18 on this day.

Due Monday:

  • By Class Time: Over the weekend, form your groups for the satire project (2-4 people per group, and make sure you include Friday's absentees, Cece, Max, Dylan, Erin). Begin discussing what you'd like to do for your topic.
  • By 10:00PM: Submit your finalized Tragedy Reading Portfolio to Turnitin.

Class Mon 10/08 - Fri 10/12; HW due Tues 10/09 - Fri 10/12; Polished Rough Draft due Mon 10/15; Reading Portfolio due Mon 10/22

On Monday, we reviewed peer and teacher feedback on our thesis statements. We also reviewed basic guidelines for topic sentences, introductions, and the "so what."

On Tuesday, we conducted a formal peer review session on our tragedy thesis essay drafts. We also watched a pre-reading documentary on Jane Austen.

On Wednesday, we continued our initial formal peer review. We also did some pre-reading on historical and literary context for Pride and Prejudice.

This class dropped on Thursday.

On Friday, we conducted a brief peer review session on our tragedy thesis essay. We also reviewed Ms. Hernberg's feedback on our first nonfiction reading portfolio entry.

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Due Tuesday: Compose a draft of:

  • Introduction
  • At least one body paragraph
  • "So what"

Due Wednesday:

  • Compose a draft of a least one additional body paragraph.
  • If applicable, begin making the revisions suggested by your peer review group.

Due Friday:

  • Come to class with a full draft of your thesis essay. Be prepared for peer review.
  • Read the background information on Pride and Prejudice Ms. Hernberg handed out in class Wednesday.
  • Review the following terms on the AP Glossary: well-made novel, novel of manners, realism, Romantic Period, romanticism, comedy.

Due Monday 10/15

  • By Class Time: Review Ms. Hernberg's feedback on "Reading Portfolio 1, Tragedy 1." Make a revision plan for Tragedy 1 and Tragedy 2 (both nonfiction entries).
  • By 10:00PM: Submit your full, polished rough draft of your thesis essay to Google Classroom.

Due Monday 10/22 by 10:00PM: Submit your finalized Tragedy Reading Portfolio to Turnitin.

Class Tues 10/02 - Fri 10/05; HW due Wed 10/03 - Mon 10/08

This class dropped on Monday.

On Tuesday, we began exploring Okonkwo's character development while in Mbanta.

On Wednesday, we continued discussing the play, particularly focusing on graphic frameworks for understanding the structure of the play. Ms. Hernberg also posed the following questions for us to discuss:

  • When does the plot (the story) actually begin? What is exposition, and what is plot?
  • Where is the climax? Have we gotten to the climax yet? How do we know?
  • Where does the structure deviate from Aristotle? What does it have in common?
  • Should we read the book as a cohesive whole or as 2-3 separate works?
  • Should we focus more on plot or on character when interpreting the novel? How might this distinction influence our understanding of the novel?

On Thursday, we took a multiple choice quiz on Part II of Things Fall Apart. The quiz items were based on AP-style items. We also reviewed excerpts from two additional background resources: Simon Gikandi's "Chinua Achebe and the Invention of African Literature," and Don C. Ohadike's "Igbo Culture and History." Then, we drafted a tentative thesis and began gathering evidence.

On Friday, we reviewed the multiple choice quiz. Then, we conducted a peer review session for our thesis statement drafts, and began drafting the essay.

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Due Wednesday: Finish reading Things Fall Apart (to page 209).

Due Thursday:

  • Watch Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's "The Danger of a Single Story." As you watch, take notes on connections with the last paragraph of Things Fall Apart and with Wednesday's discussions on why it matters how we choose to interpret the novel.
  • Revise your graphic structure for understanding Things Fall Apart.
  • We will have a multiple-choice quiz on some section of Parts II/III on this day.

Due Friday:

  • Review the requirements for the thesis paper and begin brainstorming ideas. Come to class with a drafted thesis statement.
  • Reading Portfolio 1, Tragedy 5: Things Fall Apart Parts II/III.
  • Skim-read the following excerpts from the supplemental reading packet (also available on Google Classroom under "Things Fall Apart PDF & Extra Resources":
    • "Chinua Abebe and the Invention of African Literature" by Simon Gikandi (read in full, p. ix - xvii)
    • "Igbo Culture and History" by Don C. Ohadike:
      • "Social and Political Structures," introduction, xxii - xxiii
      • "Council of Elders," xxiii - xxv
      • "The Acquisition of Titles and the Council of Chiefs," xxvi - xxvii
      • "Secret Societies," xxx
      • "Homicide," xxxvii - xxxviii
      • "Igbo Oracles," xxxviii - xxxix
      • "The Igbo People Meet the Europeans: The Era of Informal Empire," introduction, xxxix - xli
      • "The British Annexation of Igboland: The Era of Formal Empire," introduction, xliv - xlv
      • "Conclusions," xlviii - xlix

Due Monday:

  • Come to class with a revised thesis statement and a rough outline.
  • Finish your feedback on your peers' thesis statements.
  • Submit your REVISED thesis statement to Socrative Student (Room Name = HERNBERG).

Class Mon 9/24 & Tues 9/25; HW due Tues 9/25 & Wed 9/26

On Monday, we discussed how Okonkwo's initial characterization does or does not fit into the Aristotelian image of a tragic hero. We also conducted a close reading of page 13 to detect early signs of Okonkwo's tragic flaw, and/or early foreshadowing of what might be his hamartia.

On Tuesday, we discussed how the Ikemefuna episode developed complexity/contradictions in Okonkwo's characterization. We also brainstormed open-ended questions on chapter 1-8 and began a fishbowl discussion.

On Wednesday, we continued our fishbowl discussion.

On Thursday, we composed a practice free response question to a passage in Part I of Things Fall Apart.

On Friday, we reviewed our responses to Part I of Things Fall Apart. Then, we worked together on a close annotation of the final two pages of Ch. 13. We discussed: how do Aristotle's thoughts about actions in a tragedy give us a way of thinking about Achebe's choices in diction and syntax?

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Due Tuesday: Read/annotate/take notes on Things Fall Apart chapter 5-8 (p.74). Be prepared for a fishbowl discussion Tuesday on - How does the Ikemefuna episode develop complexity/contradictions in Okonkwo's characterization? What alternate frames of reference does Achebe provide you with to give you different ways of thinking about Okonkwo's actions?

Due Wednesday: Read/annotate/take notes on Things Fall Apart chapter 9-11 (p.109). Submit at least one additional open-ended question to the Google Form before class Wednesday.

Due Thursday: Read/annotate/take notes on Things Fall Apart chapter 12-13 (p.125).

Due Friday: Reading Portfolio 1, Tragedy 4: Things Fall Apart Part I

Due Tuesday 10/02: Read Things Fall Apart Part II to (p.167).

Class Mon 9/17 - Fri 9/21; HW due Thurs 9/20 - Mon 9/24

On Monday, we began by conducting a close reading of Choral Odes III and IV to explore the conflict related to belief in divine prophecy. Then, we continued Friday's analysis of two dichotomies/tensions in interpretation for the play: fate vs. free will, and hamartia vs. tragic flaw. We used this analysis to lead into our final discussion of the play. We will continue this final discussion on Thursday.

This class dropped on Tuesday.

Wednesday was Yom Kippur - no school.

On Thursday, we began with our vocabulary quiz, then continued our final discussion of Oedipus Rex. We also introduced the Things Fall Apart essay, rubric, and reading guide, and reviewed some historical and cultural contexts for our reading of Things Fall Apart.

On Friday, we discussed "The Second Coming," then read and discussed excerpts from "An African Voice."

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Due Thursday:

Due Friday:

  • Read and annotate "The Second Coming" by William Butler Yeats.
  • Reading Portfolio 1, Tragedy 3: Oedipus Rex

Due Monday: Read/annotate/take notes on Things Fall Apart chapter 1-4 (p.35). Focus on Okonkwo's characterization - how is Achebe introducing a tension in Okonkwo's character?

Class Tues 9/11 - Fri 9/14; HW due Wed 9/12 - Mon 9/17

Monday was Rosh Hashanah - no school. Shanah Tovah Umetukah!

On Tuesday, we reviewed the weekend's vocabulary, then used a performance activity to explore the tension between Oedipus and Teiresias. We also reviewed our observations on Oedipus's initial characterization/character development based on our reading homework notes and on the tension activity. Finally we conducted a close reading of the chorus on pages 25-26 using the following guiding questions:

  • How does the Chorus respond to Oedipus and Teiresias's exchange?
  • What universal theme or tension is developed in the ode that we discussed while reading Knox's "Introduction to Oedipus"?

On Wednesday, we discussed our close reading of pages 25-26, debriefed on Poetics VI-XI, and conducted a close reading of Oedipus Rex, focusing on metaphor.

On Thursday, we debriefed on Poetics VII-XV. We also continued discussing the characterization of Oedipus, in particular differentiating between the hamartia (action) and/or tragic flaw (character) that will ultimately lead to the catastrophe/downfall. Finally, we reviewed terms from the glossary and Poetics in preparation for a vocabulary quiz. Ms. Hernberg handed out a quick reference sheet with more pithy definitions for each of the terms.

On Friday, we began by continuing our close reading of motifs in Oedipus Rex, then began preparing for a discussion of two dichotomies/tensions in interpretation for the play: fate vs. free will, and hamartia vs. tragic flaw.

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Due Wednesday:

  • Log into Turnitin and make sure you can access this class. If you received a temporary password, you may want to change it to your school password. This account is where you will turn in the final version of your reading portfolio for holistic assessment, as well as certain long-term writing assignments.
  • Read Poetics Section I, Parts VI-XI (excluding VIII). Take notes using the note-taking guide attached on Google Classroom.
  • Review the following terms on the AP Glossary:
    • deus ex machina
    • anagnorisis
    • hamartia
    • tragic flaw
    • catharsis
    • hubris
    • ode
    • strophe
    • antistrophe
    • prologue
    • parados
    • peripeteia

Due Thursday:

  • Read Poetics Section I, Parts VII-XV. Take notes using the note-taking guide attached on Google Classroom.
  • Read Oedipus Rex through the bottom of page 51, up to the part where the Messenger speaks again. Annotate (using stickie notes or in your notebooks) in particular for a line of inquiry that interests you (one that that you may write your Reading Portfolio response on once we finish the play). You could look at Oedipus's characterization/character development, the theme of fate vs. free will, the conflict of belief in divine prophecy, some aspect of language use, how Aristotle's dramatic principles apply to Oedipus, etc.

Due Friday: Reading Portfolio 1, Tragedy 2: "Summary of Poetics"

Due Monday: Finish reading Oedipus Rex and prepare for our whole-class discussion of the play using the note-taking guide on Google Classroom.

Class Tues 9/04 - Fri 9/07; HW due Wed 9/05 - Tues 9/11

Monday was Labor Day - no school.

On Tuesday, we discussed lines of inquiry present in Bernard Knox's "Introduction to Oedipus Rex." We also reviewed a presentation on Greek tragedy in preparation for our reading of Aristotle's Poetics.

This class dropped on Wednesday.

On Thursday, we discussed Poetics Section I, Parts I-V. We then prepared for our reading of Oedipus Rex by doing a performance mini-lesson on status. Finally, we began reading Oedipus Rex with the following guiding question in mind: How does Oedipus's status affect both his sense of self and his external position in this scene?

On Friday, our class was visited by guidance counselors for a workshop on the college application process.

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Due Thursday 9/06: Read Poetics Section I, Parts I-V. Take notes using the note-taking guide attached on Google Classroom. Keep in mind that thorough, thoughtful notes are essential to prepare you for class discussions and for your next reading portfolio assignment.

Due Friday 9/07: Continue reading Oedipus Rex up to Creon's entrance on page 27. Take notes on Oedipus's character development. As you take notes, keep in mind that one of your reading portfolio responses will be to write a response on a line of inquiry that interests you in Oedipus Rex.

Due Tuesday 9/11: Review the following terms on the AP Glossary:

  • Plot
  • Character
  • Spectacle
  • Drama
  • Tragedy
  • Dramatic Structure
  • Freytag's Pyramid

Class Thurs 8/30 & Fri 8/31; HW due Fri 8/31 & Tues 9/04

After introductions on Thursday, we briefly reviewed the syllabus and the format of the AP test, then heard brief "text talks" about the books we will be reading for this course. On Friday, we reviewed the syllabus in detail, then introduced our first unit of study: tragedy.

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Due Friday:

  • Pre-Reading: Why Tragedies are Alluring (questions on Google Classroom).
  • Bookmark this website!
  • Set up your Google Classroom and Turnitin accounts.
  • Set up email forwarding if you do not habitually check your school email.

Due Tuesday:

  • Study for syllabus quiz.
  • Read and sign your syllabus, and have your parent/guardian read and sign it as well.
  • Reading Portfolio: Read Bernard Knox's "Introduction to Oedipus Rex" and summarize a line of inquiry in the text. You will submit this first response to Google Classroom so I may give you immediate formative rubric feedback, but ultimately your Reading Portfolio will be submitted to TurnItIn.