Per.5 Honors Sophomore English

Course Materials - Access the syllabus and other general course information.

Google Classroom - This is where you will upload most assignments for this course.

Turnitin - This is where you will upload some final assignments for this course.

Class Mon 2/11 - Thurs 2/14; HW due Wed 2/13 - Thurs 2/14

On Monday, we began reading and discussing Macbeth Act III.

This class dropped on Tuesday.

On Wednesday, we finished reviewed through 3.5 of Macbeth.

On Thursday, we went to the library for a book talk and to choose our Q3 books. We used any time remaining in the period to read our books!

~

Due Wednesday: Read Macbeth 3.3, 3.4, and 3.6 using the Hernberg Method.

Due Thursday: If you have already chosen a Q3 recreational reading book, please bring it to class on this day.

Due Monday 2/25 by 3:00PM: Q3 Book Survey

There is no homework over Winter Break. Please enjoy your time to rest and recharge!

Class Mon 2/04 - Fri 2/08; HW due Tues 2/05 - Mon 2/11

On Monday, we discussed our triple-sided journal entries for Act I of Macbeth and examined Macbeth's first soliloquy in 1.7; we created tableaus of this soliloquy.

On Tuesday we did an activity with the conversation between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth in 1.7. We also began reviewing Act 2.

On Wednesday, we examined Macbeth 2.1 and 2.2, focusing on the dagger scene in 2.1. We also discussed the comic relief in 2.3.

On Thursday, we examined Macbeth 2.3 and 2.4, focusing on the comic relief in 2.3. We also spent some time drafting our second triple-sided journal entries for Macbeth Act II.

On Friday, we shared our second triple-sided journal entries (for Macbeth Act II). Then, we began reading and discussing Macbeth Act III.

~

Due Tuesday:

  • By Class Time: Read Macbeth 2.1 using the Hernberg Method.
  • By 3:00PM: Revise your first triple-sided journal entry for Act I of Macbeth. Submit to Turnitin.

Due Wednesday: Read Macbeth 2.2 using the Hernberg Method.

Due Thursday: Read Macbeth 2.3, and 2.4 using the Hernberg Method.

Due Friday:

  • By Class Time: Draft your second triple-sided journal entry for Act II of Macbeth.
  • By 10:00PM: Revise your second triple-sided journal entry for Act II of Macbeth. Submit to Turnitin.

Due Monday: Read Macbeth 3.1 and 3.2 using the Hernberg Method.

Class Mon 1/28 - Fri 2/01; HW due Tues 1/29 - Mon 2/04

On Monday, we watched and discussed professional interpretations of 1.1. We also began discussing Macbeth 1.2.

On Tuesday, we discussed Macbeth through 1.4.

On Wednesday, we practiced performing Shakespearean insults. Then, we watched a professional version of Macbeth 1.3 and 1.4, paying special attention to Macbeth's reaction to the witches's prophecy, to the news that he is in fact Thane of Cawdor, and to the news that Malcolm is to be the next king.

This class dropped on Thursday.

On Friday, we debriefed our observations of the professional version of 1.3 and 1.4. Then, we examined Lady Macbeth's lines in 1.5.

~

Due Tuesday: Read Macbeth 1.3 using the Hernberg Method.

Due Wednesday: Read Macbeth 1.5 using the Hernberg Method.

Due Friday:

  • Read Macbeth 1.6 and 1.7 using the Hernberg Method.
  • Come to class prepared with a believable interpretation of an animal. Think about how you can imitate an animal with your body, face, and voice.

Due Monday: Draft your first triple-sided journal entry for Act I of Macbeth.

Class Thurs 1/24 & Fri 1/25; HW due Mon 1/28

On Thursday, we reviewed the Hernberg Method for Reading Shakespeare. We also began reading and interpreting Act 1, Scene 1 (1.1) of Macbeth.

On Friday, we performed Act 1, Scene 1 (1.1) of Macbeth.

~

Due Monday: Read Macbeth 1.2 using the Hernberg Method.

Class Tues 1/15 & Wed 1/16; Midterm Exam Tues 1/22; Poetry Project due Tues 1/22

This class dropped on Monday.

On Tuesday, we reviewed the structure of and rubric for the midterm exam, which will be a reading benchmark.

On Wednesday, we had time for a last peer review day for the Poetry Projects. We also reviewed study strategies, the most important of which is to get plenty of sleep and eat breakfast!

~

Due Tuesday 1/22:

  • By 7:45AM: Your midterm exam begins at this time; please arrive a few minutes early so you may utilize the full time allotment. Rubric and study materials are available on Google Classroom.
  • By 2:00PM: The final draft of your Poetry Project is due to Turnitin by this time.
Poetry Project Conference Sign-Up

Class Mon 1/07 - Fri 1/11; HW due Wed 1/09; One-Pager due Thurs 1/10

On Monday, we split into our Poetry Circles groups and conducted formal peer review sessions for our poems.

On Tuesday, we experimented with poetic structure by examining Mary Mackey's "All the Way Down." Then, we had time to work on our Poetry Projects or our Q2 One-Pagers.

Wednesday was a full peer-review session for the Poetry Projects.

On Thursday, we discussed a series of strong statements about the themes of Macbeth.

On Friday, we had time to work on our Poetry Projects.

~

Homework All Week: Poetry Project conferences take place this week. A full draft of your Poetry Project (poem + explication) is due by your conference time.

Due Wednesday: Come to class prepared for a peer review session on the Poetry Projects.

Due Thursday by 10:00PM: Q2 One-Pager (submit to Google Classroom)

Class Thurs 1/03 & Fri 1/04; HW due Fri 1/04 & Mon 1/07; Final Draft due Fri 1/04; One-Pager due Thurs 1/10

On Thursday, we reviewed requirements for the Poetry Project explication and reflection; we also examined model explications and reflections.

On Friday, we spent the first half of class engaged in peer editing for the Lord of the Flies thesis essays. Students who already submitted their final drafts had this time to either compose their Q2 One-Pagers or to work on their Poetry Projects. Then, we split into our Poetry Circles groups and conducted formal peer review sessions for our poems. Finally, we signed up for next week's mandatory conference slots for the Poetry Projects.

~

Due Friday:

  • By Class Time: Outline or draft your Poetry Project explication. If you have time, you can also continue revising your chosen poem.
  • By 10:00PM: Lord of the Flies final draft (submit to Turnitin)

Due Monday:

  • Keep in mind that Poetry Project conferences begin this day. A full draft of your Poetry Project (poem + explication) is due by your conference time.
  • Spend 20-30 minutes revising your Poetry Project poem.
  • If you have time, you may also choose to compose/revise your explication.

Due Thursday January 10 by 10:00PM: Q2 One-Pager (submit to Google Classroom)

Class Mon 12/17 - Fri 12/21; HW due Thurs 12/20 & Fri 12/21; Final Draft due by Fri 1/04

On Monday, we composed "blackout poetry" with our newspaper/magazine articles. We also continued writing our "art-inspired" poems and reviewed Ms. Hernberg's feedback on our LOTF thesis essay drafts.

Tuesday was a work day for the LOTF thesis essay drafts. Students also had the option to reading their Q2 books or work on their Q2 One-Pagers.

On Wednesday, we composed "scent memory poems," inspired by food. We also reviewed the structure of Shakespearean sonnets (and learned about iambic pentameter, quatrains, and couplets).

On Thursday, we had an initial conversation with our peer groups to narrow down our Poetry Project poem possibilities. We also had time to work on either revising our chosen poem, do some more free-writing to narrow down our poem choices, or work on our LOTF thesis essay drafts.

Friday was a work day. We had the choice of working on the Poetry Project, the Lord of the Flies thesis essay, or the Q2 One-Pager.

~

Due Thursday: Compose one quatrain in iambic pentameter with an ABAB rhyme structure.

Due Friday:

  • Spend 10-20 minutes revising and/or typing your poem. If you still aren’t sure which poem to use, spend half the time brainstorming/revising one poem and half the time brainstorming/revising the other.
  • Bring your Q2 book to class Friday.

Due by 10:00PM on Friday 1/04: The final draft of your LOTF thesis essay is due to Turnitin by this time. You are welcome, however, to submit the essay at any time before this date; Ms. Hernberg considers this an extension on the time she would normally allow.

Class Mon 12/10 - Fri 12/14; HW due Tues 12/11 - Mon 12/17

On Monday, we continued analyzing our third Poetry Circles poem, began work on an outline for our group response, and began free-writing activity with poetry chosen from Ms. Hernberg's collection.

On Tuesday, we composed a group response about our Poetry Circles poet. We also began work on a poem inspired by poetry chosen from Ms. Hernberg's collection.

This class dropped on Wednesday.

On Thursday, we worked on an original poem inspired by the writing style of our Poetry Circles poet.

On Friday, we reflected on our creative choices in writing our Thursday poems. We also did a free-writing activity based on the most recent student art exhibition at NCHS.

~

Due Tuesday: Set a timer for 15-20 FOCUSED minutes. Use that time to revise one of your four partially-written poems:

  • Scene poem: inspired by "First Warm Morning, Amsterdam Avenue"
  • Homework poem: Select a line from the poem you found and use it as your own first line.
  • Adopted voice poem: Inspired by and in the voice (from the perspective) of the photo of the loved one you brought to class.
  • Poem of appreciation/love poem (for the loved one whose photo you brought to class).

Due Thursday: Select a line, phrase, or word from a poem in Ms. Hernberg's collection (or another poem of your choice). Use it to either inspire your own poem, OR try to integrate the line/phrase/word into your own poem.

Due Friday: Set a timer for 15-20 FOCUSED minutes. Use that time to polish/revise the poem you began in class Thursday.

Due Monday: Print out or cut out 1 - 3 newspaper or magazine articles that really speak to you. The articles could be about anything. It is most important that you bring a hard copy that you can write on to class.

Class Mon 12/03 - Fri 12/07; HW Tues 12/04 - Mon 12/10

On Monday, we continued our work examining the enjambment in "Grief Calls Us to the Things of This World," then re-examined the first and second poems in our poetry packets based on the biographical information we found on our Poetry Circles poet. Finally, we examined Marcus Jackson's poem "First Warm Morning, Amsterdam Avenue" and began writing our own scene poems.

On Tuesday, we read an excerpt from Mary Oliver's A Poetry Handbook, then re-read Marcus Jackson's poem "First Warm Morning, Amsterdam Avenue" to review alliteration, assonance, and consonance. We also learned about spoken word poetry, and listened to two poems: Taylor Mali's "Totally like whatever, you know?" and Sarah Kay's "If I should have a daughter."

On Wednesday, we did a free-writing activity based on the poems we found for last night's homework. We also learned about the connection between songwriting and poetry.

On Thursday, we shared our poem/song pairings. Then, we examined the structure of Helen Klein Ross' "Adventure" and an excerpt from Sandra Cisneros' The House on Mango Street, "Darius & the Clouds." We discussed the question of what poetry actually is, and in what ways poetry differs from prose.

On Friday, we composed an "adopted voice" poem based on the photograph we brought to class. We also discussed and annotated the third poem in our poetry packets.

~

Due Tuesday:

  • Taking Jackson's poem as your inspiration, compose your own "scene poem."
  • Bring a pair of headphones to class tomorrow.
  • If applicable: Revise your haiku. Remember that you must attach the previously graded version to your revised version; Ms. Hernberg will not grade it otherwise.

Due Wednesday: Search http://poetryfoundation.org/ or http://www.poets.org/ for a poem (ANY poem--it does NOT have to be related to your Poetry Circles group). Find one that speaks to you, and print it out.

Due Thursday: Pair the poem you found for last night's homework with a song (instrumental and/or lyrical) of your choosing. Then, write a paragraph explaining your choice. Be sure to use textual evidence and details from the song to explain your pairing! Submit to Google Classroom.

Due Friday: Bring a photograph of a loved one to class (yes, it can be on your phone).

Due Monday 12/10: Spend 10-15 minutes preparing notes for your group response to the Poetry Circles poems. Pay attention to *patterns* you noticed in the poems (patterns may be thematic, symbolic, or structural). Come to class prepared to discuss these patterns with your group.

FUN BONUS: This is the podcast (Serial) Ms. Hernberg was talking about in class this week, and here is the article discussing narrative structure. The part of the article I found most thought-provoking was this quote: "There is a chance, a good chance, every chance, that this story is going to end in frustration and discomfort, maybe in near equipoise, and it will be nonsensical to blame for that writers who didn't know what they were doing. What's good about this wrinkle, and what seems healthy about it, is that it raises the question of what stories are for. Must there be a lesson or a moral? Must we sense a particular idea about life at the end, and can it be futility? If you raise a question, do you have to answer it?"

Class Mon 11/26 - Thurs 11/29; HW due Tues 11/27 - Mon 12/03

On Monday, we continued reviewing the difference between mood and tone by examining Norman Rockwell's "Boy and Father: Homework" and Gjertrud Schnackenberg's "The Bicyclist." We also read, annotated, and discussed our first Poetry Circles poem.

On Tuesday, we read Sherman Alexie's "Grief Calls Us to the Things of This World." We examined Alexie's word choice in this poem and discussed the power of language in conveying emotion. We also continued annotating, discussing, and reflecting on the first poem in our Poetry Circles groups, then moved on to our second poems.

On Wednesday, we learned about haikus and "terrible poetry."

On Thursday, we continued learning about "terrible poetry" and composed our own purposefully terrible poems. We also learned about enjambment and discussed how the enjambment in Schnackenberg's and Alexie's poems creates meaning.

This class dropped on Friday.

~

Due Tuesday: Your homework for tonight depends on your Poetry Circles poet:

Due Thursday: Compose two properly structured English haikus. Label the kigo, the kireji, and the images/ideas. PRINT OUT A HARD COPY to bring to class.

Due Monday: Conduct informal biographical research on your Poetry Circles poet. For the purposes of this assignment, Wikipedia and similar sites are fine. Come to class prepared to share with your group.

Class Mon 11/19 - Wed 11/21; Rough Draft due Mon 11/19; HW due Wed 11/21

On Monday, we reviewed and did an exercise on passive voice. We also examined model conclusions. and had a chance to touch base with our peer conferencing groups and work on edits for our LOTF thesis essays.

On Tuesday, we began our poetry unit by reading Billy Collins' "Introduction to Poetry." We also read Gjertrud Schnackenberg's "The Bicyclist" and learned about the difference between mood and tone.

Wednesday was a reading day for our Q2 books.

~

Due Monday by 10:00PM: A full, polished rough draft of your LOTF thesis statement is due to Turnitin for Ms. Hernberg's feedback.

Due Wednesday:

There is no homework over Thanksgiving Break. Please enjoy your time to rest and be with your family!

Class Mon 11/12 & - Thurs 11/15; HW due Tues 11/13 - Thurs 11/15; Draft due Mon 11/19

On Monday, we held a formal peer review session for our introductions. We also reviewed Ms. Hernberg's feedback on our thesis statements (emailed on Saturday) and held an informal peer conversation on our drafts so far.

On Tuesday, we learned about body paragraph structure and quote integration. We examined a model body paragraph and reviewed in-text citation formatting. We also learned about quote selection: using quotes for analysis rather than for plot summary.

On Wednesday, we had informal peer review and revision/writing time, did a close-reading exercise on quote analysis, and reviewed conclusion formatting.

On Thursday, we held a formal peer review session for our drafts.

This class dropped on Friday.

~

Due Tuesday: Set a timer for 20-30 minutes, then begin working through this to-do list. Some of you may already be done with part of this list, in which case you can feel free to skip certain elements. So long as you remain focused during those 20-30 minutes, when the timer goes off, find a good place to pause in your work and then set it aside.

  • Don't forget to sign up for a conference! The sign-up sheet was sent to your email over the weekend.
  • Revise your thesis statement based on Ms. Hernberg's feedback.
  • Revise your introduction based on peer feedback.
  • Finalize your quotes from Lord of the Flies, and locate any additional (outside) sources you may need to make your argument.
  • Come to class with two fully drafted body paragraphs.

Due Wednesday:

  • Finalize any (outside) sources/quotes you may need to make your argument. Format your Works Cited page for these sources.
  • If necessary for your argument, draft one additional body paragraph (total = 3).

Due Thursday:

  • By Class Time:
    • If necessary for your argument, draft one additional body paragraph (total = 4).
    • Draft your conclusion.
  • By 10:00PM: Q2 Book Survey

Due Monday 11/19 by 10:00PM: A full, polished rough draft of your LOTF thesis essay is due to Turnitin for Ms. Hernberg's feedback.

Class Wed 11/07 - Fri 11/09; HW due Wed 11/07 - Mon 11/12

This class dropped on Monday, and Tuesday was Election Day - no school for students.

On Wednesday, we learned a technique for writing topic sentences. We also reviewed requirements for thesis statement structure.

On Thursday, we conducted a peer review session for the thesis statements. We also reviewed introduction structure and the "so what."

On Friday, the librarians hosted us for the Q2 book talk!

~

Due Thursday:

  • Revise your thesis statement based on Wednesday's learning.
  • Write your revised thesis statement on BOTH of the blank peer review sheets Ms. Hernberg handed out in class Wednesday.
  • Come to class with 2-4 drafted topic sentences. Use the technique we learned about in class Wednesday to get started!

Due Friday:

  • If you already have a Q2 book, bring it to class!
  • Revise your topic sentences.
  • Come to class with a fully drafted introduction and "so what."

Due Monday:

  • Begin collecting evidence from Lord of the Flies. Ms. Hernberg recommends starting with six meaty quotes for analysis.
  • Come to class with at least one fully drafted body paragraph.

Class Mon 10/29 - Fri 11/02; One-Pager due Tues 10/30; HW due Tues 10/30 - Wed 11/07

On Monday, we revised our open-ended discussion questions for Lord of the Flies. We also practiced our discussion skills through small-group work on chapters 10-12.

On Tuesday, we began our full-class discussion on the whole of Lord of the Flies. We learned about Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. We also spent time refining our projects and/or composing our Q1 One-Pagers.

Our Philosopher/Scientist Project Presentations took place on Wednesday and Thursday. We also reviewed thesis statement structure, introduction structure, and the "so what" on Thursday.

On Friday, we continued our full-class discussion of Lord of the Flies, this time with the new knowledge of the philosopher/scientist theories as lenses for interpretation. We also spent time revising our thesis statements.

~

Due Tuesday:

  • By Class Time:
    • LOTF Response 4 DRAFT: Choose one question from the class spreadsheet of open-ended questions. Use evidence (QUOTES!) from the book to support your response. Organize your analysis into paragraphs.
    • We will have a full-class discussion on Tuesday.
  • By 10:00PM: Your Q1 One-Pager is due to Google Classroom by this time.

Due Wednesday: Philosopher/Scientist Project Presentations will begin on this day.

Due Thursday:

Due Friday: Come to class with a draft of your thesis statement.

Class Mon 10/22 - Fri 10/26; HW due Tues 10/23 - Fri 10/26; Presentation due Mon 10/29; One-Pager due Tues 10/30

On Monday, we continued discussing Simon's scenes in chapters 8 and 9.

On Tuesday, we discussed the motifs of the glasses and the conch in chapters 10 and 11.

This class dropped on Wednesday.

On Thursday, we watched a short clip from Parks and Recreation 3.13 ("The Fight"), which has a Lord of the Flies reference. Then, continued discussing Simon's scenes in chapters 8 and 9.

On Friday, we continued discussing chapters 10-12 of Lord of the Flies. We reviewed speaking skills requirements for the philosopher/scientist presentation. Then, we had a work day for the Philosopher/Scientist Project.

~

Due Tuesday: Read/annotate (with stickie notes) chapter 11 of Lord of the Flies.

Due Thursday:

  • Read/annotate (with stickie notes) chapter 12 of Lord of the Flies.
  • Coordinate with your group to begin an outline and/or draft for your Philosopher/Scientist Project visual.

Due Friday: Come to class prepared to work on your Philosopher/Scientist project presentations.

Due Monday: Compose two open-ended discussion questions for LOTF.

Due Tuesday 10/30 by 10:00PM: Your Q1 One-Pager is due to Google Classroom by this time.

Class Mon 10/15 - Thurs 10/18; HW due Tues 10/16 - Fri 10/19; Podcast due Fri 10/19

On Monday, we prepared for our This I Believe podcasts.

On Tuesday, we had "play time" to experiment with audio software and to help one another with technical issues. We also began a close reading of key scenes in chapter 4 of Lord of the Flies.

On Wednesday, we continued discussing Lord of the Flies through chapter 7. We continued discussing symbols in the book, focusing on the mask and the beast.

On Thursday, we did a close reading of passages from chapter 8 of Lord of the Flies.

On Friday, we had some time to work out the technicalities of editing/uploading our podcasts. We also continued our discussions of passages from chapters 8 and 9 of Lord of the Flies, focusing on the blood motif and on Simon's hallucination.

~

Due Tuesday: Record a test version of your This I Believe essay. As you record, keep in mind the attributes we discussed in class on Monday: pace, volume, pauses, pitch/tone, musicality/meter, enunciation.

Due Wednesday: LOTF Response 2.

Due Thursday:

  • OPTIONAL: Revise & Resubmit LOTF Response 2.
  • Read/annotate (with stickie notes) chapter 8 of Lord of the Flies.

Due Friday:

  • By Class Time: Read/annotate (with stickie notes) chapter 9 of Lord of the Flies.
  • By 10:00PM: Record and edit your This I Believe podcast. Upload to YouTube (your .mp3 will transform into a .mp4). Change the video privacy to "Unlisted." Name the YouTube video as follows: "Title of Essay by Firstname LastInitial." Share the link to your uploaded video with Ms. Hernberg.

Due Monday: Read/annotate (with stickie notes) chapter 10 of Lord of the Flies.

Class Mon 10/08 - Thurs 10/11; HW due Wed 10/10 & Mon 10/15; Final Draft due Thurs 10/11

On Monday, we had some work time for Q1 Recreational Reading and/or the This I Believe essay. We reviewed our weekend research on our philosopher/scientists. We also began a close analysis of three major symbols in Lord of the Flies: fire, glasses, and conch.

On Tuesday, we continued our analysis of those three major symbols. We also discussed the initial characterization of Jack, Ralph, and Piggy. Finally, we reviewed Ms. Hernberg's feedback on "The Swimmer."

On Wednesday, we continued our discussions of Lord of the Flies, focusing on key scenes in chapter 4. We also read and discussed "Menace," a cartoon by Hyperbole and a Half.

On Thursday, we reviewed comma splices and spent some time making final edits to our This I Believe essays. We also continued discussing Lord of the Flies through chapter 5.

This class dropped on Friday.

~

Due Wednesday:

  • Read Lord of the Flies chapters 4 & 5.
  • OPTIONAL: Revise and re-submit LOTF Response 1.

Due Thursday by 10:00PM: The final draft of your This I Believe essay is due by this time.

Due Monday: Read Lord of the Flies chapters 6 & 7.

Class Mon 10/01 - Fri 10/05; HW due Mon 10/02 - Tues 10/09; Final Draft due Thurs 10/11

On Monday, we took day 1 of the first sophomore reading benchmark assessment.

This class dropped on Tuesday.

On Wednesday, we began discussing through chapter 3 of Lord of the Flies, focusing on the Progression of the Hunt Chart. We also assigned philosopher/scientist research presentation topics.

On Thursday, we had time to work on our This I Believe drafts and discussed how Golding characterizes Piggy, Jack, and Ralph in the beginning of Lord of the Flies.

On Friday, we reviewed reading benchmark scores and created reading goals. We also began working on our philosopher/scientist presentations, discussed what a "reliable resource" is, and reviewed LOTF Reader Response 1.

~

Due Wednesday: Read/annotate (with stickie notes) chapters two and three of Lord of the Flies.

Due Thursday: Comb through the Wikipedia entry on your assigned philosopher/scientist to gain a basic understanding of his theories and to gather key words for a research project. As you read this entry, keep in mind that Wikipedia is ultimately an unreliable resource; there may be details that are not correct.

  1. John Locke: Sadie, Joe, Ashley, Camden
  2. Thomas Hobbes: Olivia Licata, Meghan, Imogen, Natalie
  3. Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Olivia Li, Claudia, Alexa
  4. David Hume: Gavin, Lily, Bates
  5. Jeremy Bentham: Demetria, Nic, Ellie
  6. B.F. Skinner: Annika, Amber, Isabella

Due Friday: OPTIONAL: LOTF Reader Response 1 (OUTLINE): Choose a quotation from chapters 1 - 3 and analyze how the author uses literary elements such as metaphor, imagery, motif, and/or symbolism to effectively develop a theme in the story. Submit to Google Classroom.

Due Monday:

    • Conduct more guided, reliable research on your philosopher/scientist, and use this document to combine your research and begin planning your presentation. As you research, think about: What are your philosopher/scientist's most important ideas? How do these ideas connect to Lord of the Flies? Would your philosopher/scientist agree or disagree with Golding's ideas regarding human nature?
    • Compose and submit LOTF Reader Response 1.

Due Thursday 10/11 by 10:00PM: The final draft of your This I Believe essay is due to Turnitin by this time.

~

Hernberg's Tip of the Week: Get that Stress Out Ya Shoulders!

Once place many of us hold our stress is in our shoulders, which makes them feel tight and painful. Here are a few simple and quick shoulder exercises you can use to make yourself feel better:

  • Scapular Retraction: Squeeze your shoulder blades down and back. It may help you to also move your elbows slightly behind you and to thrust your chest out slightly as you do this. Hold for ten seconds; repeat as needed.
  • Shake It Out: Shake your hand at the wrist, your forearm at the elbow, then your arm at the shoulder. Reach up, back, out, and across in all directions. Be careful to give yourself space so you don't hit anyone, and start slow so you don't hurt yourself!
  • Ladder Ladder: Move your shoulders up to your chin by small degrees, in alternating form, until both of your shoulders are up high. Then, shrug both shoulders up, and let them drop. Repeat as needed.
  • Forward/Up/Back/Down: Rotate your shoulders forward, then up to your chin, then behind you, then down. Repeat or reverse as needed.

Class Mon 9/24 - Fri 9/28; HW due Tues 9/25 - Mon 10/01

On Monday, we worked with our peer conferencing groups on final edits for our This I Believe drafts. We also reviewed the rubric and questions for the first sophomore reading benchmark assessment.

On Tuesday, we took day 1 of the first sophomore reading benchmark assessment.

On Wednesday, we discussed and practiced voice inflection in preparation for the recording of our This I Believe podcasts using the sentence "I never stole your money" and an excerpt from "My Love Took Me Down to the River to Silence Me" by Little Green Cars. We also did some voice work by reading our favorite childhood books out loud, and reviewed expectations for the This I Believe podcast project.

On Thursday, we had a full-class discussion about how to define evil.

On Friday, we discussed chapter 1 of Lord of the Flies.

~

Due Tuesday: Come to class prepared for the multiple choice section of the September reading benchmark. You can prepare by getting a solid night of sleep and eating some breakfast! Make sure your device is fully charged for the benchmark.

Due Wednesday: Bring your favorite childhood book to class.

Due Friday: Read/annotate (with stickie notes) chapter one of Lord of the Flies.

Due Monday: Come to class prepared for the short essay section of the September reading benchmark. You can prepare by practicing with Heynen's "What Happened During the Ice Storm" (on Google Classroom), and by being well-rested and eating breakfast! Make sure your device is fully charged for the benchmark.

~

Hernberg's Tip of the Week: Kindness and School Spirit

Having school spirit and showing Ram Pride goes beyond wearing red and black-it also means helping to create a positive school environment where everyone feels included. This week-heck, every week!-I challenge you to make an extra effort to be kind to your fellow Rams:

  • See someone sitting alone during lunch? Invite them to sit and eat with you!
  • Know someone who is new to the school? Invite them to coordinate costumes with your friend group!
  • Notice trash in the library or the cafeteria? Coordinate your friends to help clean it up!

Class Mon 9/17 - Fri 9/21; HW due Tues 9/18 - Fri 9/21

On Monday, we reviewed annotation using an excerpt from Ernest Hemingway's In Our Time. Then, we read and discussed the Dr. Seuss' allegory Yertle the Turtle.

On Tuesday, we discussed the allegorical elements of John Cheever's "The Swimmer."

Wednesday was Yom Kippur - no school.

This class dropped on Thursday.

On Friday, we composed group responses to "The Swimmer" (What is a theme in this story? What pattern of details best illuminates this theme? Analyze at least THREE quotes in your response). We spent the remainder of the class working on our TIB essays.

~

Due Tuesday 9/18: Read OR listen to John Cheever's "The Swimmer." You can find an audio version of the story on iTunes (New Yorker: Fiction episode 93). As you read, focus your initial annotations on *questions.*

Due Friday: Re-read “The Swimmer”; focus your annotations on your group’s selected theme to prepare for your group response. Gather evidence based on a pattern of details (a central motif, or perhaps a motif and a topic that work together) that gets at that theme.

Between Friday September 7 and Friday September 21:

  • Each school night during this period, you should average 20-30 minutes writing or revising your TIB piece.
  • Drop into the Writing Center at least once during this time period. Please go to the Writing Center with a focus in mind.

Due Tuesday 9/25: Bring your favorite childhood book to class.

~

Hernberg's Tip of the Week: Bedtime Reading

One of the best things you can do for your physical, emotional, and intellectual health is avoiding screen time before bed. Instead of scrolling mindlessly through your social media feed as you try to fall asleep, try putting your phone away and starting a new bedtime ritual: pleasure reading. Doing pleasure reading before bed, even if only for a few minutes, can reduce stress and help you fall asleep faster. As an added benefit, you'll be able to get through your quarterly recreational reading! Here's the caveat: don't use a light-emitting e-reader like a Kindle, Nook, or iPad; that's just as bad as a smart phone!

Class Tues 9/11 - Fri 9/14; HW due Wed 9/12 - Mon 9/17; Draft due Fri 9/14

Monday was Rosh Hashanah - no school. Shanah Tovah Umetukah!

On Tuesday 9/11 , we discussed and practiced the peer review process.

On Wednesday, we continued to engage in peer review for our This I Believe drafts. We also discussed the importance of making a personal essay actually personal.

On Thursday, we discussed conclusions, focusing on the technique of ending with a symbolic image that "shows" the belief/purpose rather than "telling" it. We took the remainder of the period to focus our revisions on developing imagery, in particular for our conclusions.

On Friday, we discussed John McPhee's "Omission," focusing on the revision technique of "greening." We practiced this technique with "The Gettysburg Address." We took the remainder of the period to focus our revisions on "greening."

~

Due Wednesday: Log into Turnitin and make sure you can access this class. If you received a temporary password, you may want to change it to your school password. This account is where you will turn in certain long-term reading and writing assignments.

Due Friday:

  • By Class Time: Read the excerpt from John McPhee's "Omission" that Ms. Hernberg gave you in class.
  • By 10:00PM:
    • Please write one point of focus for the TIB essay for Ms. H. on the top of your Google Doc.
    • Submit a complete rough draft of your TIB essay to Google Classroom.

Due Monday: Review the annotation guidelines I handed out in class on Friday.

Between Friday September 7 and Friday September 21:

  • Each school night during this period, you should average 20-30 minutes writing or revising your TIB piece.
  • Drop into the Writing Center at least once during this time period. Please go to the Writing Center with a focus in mind.

~

BONUS RESOURCE: Reinforce your purpose through ending imagery! Check out these example book endings:

  • "But on that day as she sat at her grandmother's bedside in the fading evening light, Grace was not contemplating her future. She simply held her grandmother's hand, the palm thickened from years of making pottery." ~Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, The Thing Around Your Neck
  • "So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." ~F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby
  • "I go back to that one moment when I stood in the driveway with small rocks and clumps of dirt around my feet and looked back at the porch. And there they were. All these mothers. I have more mothers than any eight girls off the street. They are the moons shining over me." ~Sue Monk Kidd, The Secret Life of Bees
  • "A sound of clicking heels on the pavement punctured the quiet. Alex snapped open his eyes, and he and Bennie both turned--whirled, really, peering for Sasha in the ashy dark. But it was another girl, young and new to the city, fiddling with her keys." ~Jennifer Egan, A Visit from the Goon Squad
  • "Then starting home, he walked toward the trees, and under them, leaving behind him the big sky, the whisper of wind voices in the wind-bent wheat." ~Truman Capote, In Cold Blood
  • "Rowdy and I played one-on-one for hours. We played until dark. We played until the streetlights lit up the court. We played until the bats swooped down at our heads. We played until the moon was huge and golden and perfect in the dark sky. We didn't keep score." ~Sherman Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
  • "Up out of the lampshade, startled by the overhead light, flew a large nocturnal butterfly that began circling the room. The strains of the piano and violin rose up weakly from below." ~Milan Kundera, The Unbearable Lightness of Being
  • "She looked into the distance, and the old terror flamed up for an instant, then sank again. Edna heard her father's voice and her sister Margaret's. She heard the barking of an old cavalry officer chained to the sycamore tree. The spurs of the cavalry officer clanged as he walked across the porch. There was the hum of bees, and the musky odor of pinks filled the air." ~Kate Chopin, The Awakening
  • "I ran. A grown man running with a swarm of screaming children. But I didn't care. I ran with the wind blowing in my face, and a smile as wide as the Valley of Panjsher on my lips. I ran." ~Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner
  • "But after I had got them out and shut the door and turned off the light it wasn't any good. It was like saying good-bye to a statue. After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain." ~Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms
  • "She turned out the light and I patted my son's body lightly and went back to sleep." ~Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

~

Hernberg's Tip of the Week: Calendar Coordination

One of the major reasons I have such a thorough website is to help students plan ahead. Many of the assignments for this course are long-term, meaning you should work on them a little bit each night. That said, I recognize that some nights are just difficult to manage your time. Maybe you have a game, or scheduled family time, or a test the next day. I suggest taking the following steps to keep up with your work:

  1. Keep track of your assignments. Write down your homework as soon as it is assigned. Maintain an updated calendar, either in a physical planner or an electronic calendar.
  2. Identify scheduling conflicts. Do you have any tests or major assignments due?Do you have drama practice or a game? Do you have any family obligations?
  3. Plan around your scheduling conflicts. If you have a big chunk of reading due Wednesday, but you also have a biology test on Wednesday, do the bulk of your reading homework Monday night so that you have time to study for the test on Tuesday night.
  4. Know thyself. If you are the sort of person who works better in short spurts, split up your large assignments into smaller chunks. Give yourself a nightly goal for each large assignment.

Class Tues 9/04 - Fri 9/07; HW due Wed 9/05 - Tues 9/11

Monday was Labor Day - no school.

On Tuesday, we took our syllabus quiz and discussed our ideas for creating a positive and supportive classroom community. Then, we began our first writing unit by examining model This I Believe essays, focusing on how the structure/organization of each essay reinforced its meaning. We also began brainstorming a list of TIB essay possibilities.

On Wednesday, Mrs. Luhtala and Ms. Pacelli gave us a book talk in the library. We spent the remainder of the class period back in room 213 with Mr. C., reading our recreational books and/or working on our TIB drafts.

This class dropped on Thursday.

On Friday, we continued examining potential structures for the This I Believe essay. Then, we spent some time drafting and/or outlining our pieces. Finally, we began discussing the peer review process.

~

BONUS READINGS: Anne Lamott's "Shitty First Drafts" (from Bird by Bird) & George Dila's critical response "Rethinking the Shitty First Draft." There are as many ways to approach a first draft as there are writers!

~

Due Wednesday:

Due Thursday by 10:00PM: Q1 Book Survey

Due Friday:

  • By Class Time: Make an electronic copy of a This I Believe essay on a topic that interests you. Annotate the essay, focusing on structure/organization. Below the essay, answer this question: "How does the organization of this essay reinforce its meaning?" This reflection should be at least one paragraph (half page double-spaced). Submit to Google Classroom.
    • NOTE: If you prefer to annotate by hand, you may do so-just print the essay out, annotate it, and attach a scanned copy of your annotations to Google Classroom along with your typed reflection.
  • By 3:00 PM: If you have a STRONG preference with regard to who you are/are not comfortable with being in your peer review group, please send Ms. Hernberg an email by 3:00 PM.

Due Tuesday 9/11: Spend 20-30 minutes working on your This I Believe "ugly draft." Put your ugly draft on a Google Doc.

Between Friday September 7 and Friday September 21:

  • Each school night during this period, you should average 20-30 minutes writing or revising your TIB piece.
  • Drop into the Writing Center at least once during this time period. Please go to the Writing Center with a focus in mind.

~

Hernberg's Tip of the Week: Focused Efficiency

When I suggest you spend, say, 20 minutes on an assignment, I really mean it-so long as you are focused during that time:

  1. Set a timer for the allotted time. When the timer goes off, finish your thought and put the assignment aside.
  2. Eliminate distractions. I admit to being very easily distracted by my phone, so I simply put it in another room while I am working. There are also Chrome extensions (I use Forest, but there are a ton out there) and apps (e.g. Focus) that set timers and block distracting websites and apps.
  3. Reward yourself. Once time is up, give yourself a little reward for staying focused. Depending on your personality, that reward might be a little snack, a bit of exercise, or just the thrill of crossing something off your to-do list.

When you stay truly focused during a timed assignment, you will have time for other things beyond homework--you know, like living your life!

Class Thurs 8/30 & Fri 8/31; HW due Fri 8/31 & Tues 9/04

On Thursday and Friday, we reviewed the syllabus, learned "fun facts" about one another, and examined and revised a "classroom citizenship and participation" rubric. We also learned about the recreational reading requirement.

~

Due Friday:

  • Bookmark this website!
  • Set up email forwarding if you do not habitually check your school email.

Due Tuesday: