Per. 8 Literature of the Holocaust

Google Classroom - This is where you will upload certain assignments for this course.

Class Mon 5/20 - Fri 5/31; HW due Wed 5/29 - Mon 6/03

On Tuesday 5/21, we made a plan for what we would like to accomplish in the last month of the course. Ms. Hernberg has two basic requirements:

  1. We will watch Schindler's List. This will take approximately five class periods. There will be a formal response at the end, in addition to daily informal reflections.
  2. We will conduct individual research on an interest-based, human rights-related topic. A presentation and written reflection on this topic will be due on the day of the final exam (as of now, Wednesday June 12).

In addition to these three basic requirements, Ms. Hernberg has a large collection of poetry, nonfiction resources, book excerpts, videos, photographs, etc. that she can use to create a series of individualized mini-units based on student interest. Another option is to work together on a community service project connected in some way to human rights.

This class dropped on Tuesday 5/21.

On Wednesday 5/22, we watched and took notes on the following sections of a TED talk video, "The Psychology of Evil": 0:00 - 5:00; 7:15 - 22:50. Please note that the two-minute section we skipped contains graphic images of the Abu Ghraib prison abuses by U.S. Armed Forces. The images are not necessary to an understanding of Dr. Zimbardo's argument. We also began planning for our final research projects and reviewed requirements for the Annotated Works Cited.

This class dropped on Thursday 5/23.

On Friday 5/24, we began watching Schindler's List. As we watched, we took notes on Oskar Schindler's initial characterization.

We continued watching Schindler's List on Tuesday 5/28.

On Wednesday 5/29, we discussed Schindler's List so far. We also examined and discussed differing explanations of the Holocaust by Goldhagen and Browning.

On Thursday 5/30 and Friday 5/31, we participated in learning stations to help us to learn about the current refugee crisis. The guiding questions were as follows:

  • What is a refugee? What is the difference between a refugee and a migrant?
  • In what ways is the current refugee crisis similar to the European refugee crisis of the 1930s/40s? In what ways is it different?
  • What can these similarities and differences tell us about how the United States should address the current refugee crisis?

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Due Friday 5/24: Complete preliminary research on your topic and submit a typed list of resources (five) to Google Classroom. Make sure these resources are specific and reliable. Ms. Hernberg will give you initial feedback on those resources over the weekend.

Due Wednesday 5/29: Submit your Annotated Works Cited to Google Classroom. You must complete annotations for five separate sources.

Due Thursday 5/30: Perpetrator Reflection (Google Classroom)

Due Monday 6/03:

Class Mon 5/06 - Mon 5/20; HW due Tues 5/07 - Mon 5/20; Final Draft due Tues 5/14; Presentations due Wed 5/15

On Monday 5/06, we held our third Literature Circles meeting. When the Lit Circles portion of the meeting was over, we reviewed Ms. Hernberg's feedback on the Poetry Project and began making the necessary revisions.

Tuesday 5/07 was a partial work day for the Poetry Project. We learned about two structural techniques: enjambment and extra spacing. We also discussed chapters 5 and 6 of I Promised I Would Tell.

On Wednesday 5/08, we learned about Nazi persecution of the LGBTQ community; we read and discussed an excerpt from Branded by the Pink Triangle and explored an online exhibition on the topic.

On Thursday 5/09, we read the epilogue of I Promised I Would Tell and discussed chapters 7, 8, and 9. We also continued working on our Poetry Projects.

On Friday 5/10, we held our fourth and final Literature Circles meeting. We had any time remaining in the meeting to plan and practice for our Lit Circles presentations.

This class dropped on Monday 5/13.

Tuesday 5/14 was a work day for the Lit Circles presentations.

Wednesday 5/15 and Thursday 5/16 were Lit Circles presentation days. Two groups presented on each day. We also examined excerpts from interviews/testimonies by perpetrators, including Franz Stangl, Rudolf Hoess, and Adolf Eichmann and watched an excerpt from Auschwitz: Inside the Nazi State on these days.

On Friday 5/17, we discussed the perpetrator testimonies (Stangl, Hoess, and Eichmann), then watched and discussed two testimonies from Jewish survivors who were involved in the war crimes trials: Regina Zielinski (witness) and Edith Coliver (translator). Then, we discussed the excerpt from The Sunflower. We ended class with testimony on forgiveness from Eva Mozes Kor. Note that Kor's understanding of forgiveness is different from Wiesenthal's.

On Monday 5/20, we discussed the "professional" essay responses to The Sunflower, then took a survey on the course. SIP students reflected on what they learned, what they enjoyed, and any potential additions to the course. Students not attending an internship reflected on what they would like to learn more about and what they would like to research during the last month of the school year.

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Literature Circles Presentation Guidelines

  • Graded w/ Lit Circles rubric
  • Must include a visual
  • Must include quotes
  • Must be organized (theme is a good way to do this)
  • Teach the book
  • Engage your audience; don't just talk at them
  • Don't be concerned about "ruining" the end of the book
  • Time frame: 15-17 minutes (remember that it's better to over-plan than to under-plan)

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Due Tuesday 5/07: Read I Promised I Would Tell chapters 5 & 6. Be ready for a reading check.

Due Wednesday 5/07: Bring a pair of headphones to class.

Due Thursday 5/09: Read I Promised I Would Tell chapters 7, 8, and 9. Be ready for a reading check.

Due Friday 5/10: The fourth and final Literature Circles meeting will take place on this day. Be prepared having finished reading the book.

Due Tuesday 5/14 by Class Time: The final draft of your Poetry Project is due to Turnitin by this time. Failure to submit your final draft on time will result in a note sent to your administrator, guidance counselor, and parents w/r/t internship eligibility.

Due Wednesday 5/15: Come to class prepared for your Lit Circles presentations!

Due Thursday 5/16: Complete the "Perpetrator Testimonies S19" Google Form sent to your email on Wednesday.

Due Friday 5/17:

  • Submit your self/peer evaluation by class time.
  • Read the excerpt from The Sunflower.

Due Monday 5/20: Read THREE of the following essays from The Sunflower. As you read, consider how each essay supports, complicates, or contrasts your own opinion. Come to class ready to discuss!

  • Alan L. Berger 118
  • Robert McAfee Brown 121
  • Edward H. Flannery 135
  • Eva Fleischner 138
  • Hans Habe 158
  • Abraham Josua Heschel 170
  • José Hobday 174
  • Rodger Kamenetz 181
  • Harold S. Kushner 183
  • Lawrence L. Langer 186
  • André Stein 250

If you are going on an internship, I wish you luck, and I'll see you at graduation!

Class Mon 4/29 - Fri 5/03; HW due Tues 4/30 - Mon 5/06; Rough Draft due Fri 5/03 (NO EXCEPTIONS)

Monday was a work day for the Poetry Project. We also reviewed a model Poetry Project.

On Tuesday, we held our second Literature Circles meeting. When the Lit Circles portion of the meeting was over, the group transformed into a peer review group.

This class dropped on Wednesday.

On Thursday, we took a reading check on I Promised I Would Tell. We also read and discussed two poems written by Holocaust victims.

On Friday, we held formal peer review conferences for the Poetry Project.

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Due Tuesday: The second Literature Circles meeting will take place on this day. Be prepared having read the pages your group agreed upon.

Due Thursday: Read I Promised I Would Tell chapters 3 & 4. Be ready for a reading check.

Due Friday:

  • By Class Time: Spend 20-30 minutes drafting/revising your explication/poem.
  • By 10:00PM: A full rough draft of your Poetry Project is due to Turnitin for teacher feedback by this time. Failure to submit your draft on time will result in a note sent to your administrator, guidance counselor, and parents w/r/t internship eligibility.

Due Monday: The third Literature Circles meeting will take place on this day. Be prepared having read the pages your group agreed upon.

Class Mon 4/22 - Fri 4/26; In-Class Essay Tues 4/23; HW due Wed 4/24 - Tues 4/30

On Monday, we began our discussions on memory by listening to this Radiolab story, "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Rat" from the Memory and Forgetting episode. We also continued preparing for Tuesday's in-class essay by discussing In My Hands and Defiance using our brainstormed open-ended questions.

On Tuesday, we wrote an in-class compare/contrast essay on In My Hands and Defiance.

On Wednesday, we held our first Literature Circles meeting. Ms. Hernberg also handed out copies of I Promised I Would Tell.

On Thursday, we read and discussed an excerpt from Primo Levi's The Drowned and the Saved, "The Memory of the Offense," and compared it to Monday's listening.

On Friday, we discussed chapters 1 & 2 of I Promised I Would Tell.

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Bonus Reading/Viewing 1: "Human memory: How we make, remember, and forget memories"

Bonus Reading 2: Excerpts from Katherine Boo's Behind the Beautiful Forevers

A couple of years ago, I read Katherine Boo's National Book Award-winning nonfiction book about the Annawadi slum in Mumbai, and a couple of excerpts from the author's note struck me as relevant to this course and to our readings from Primo Levi's The Drowned and the Saved:

On Memory: "Being present for events or reporting them soon afterward was crucial, since as years passed, some slumdwellers recalibrated their narratives out of fear of angering the authorities. (Their fear was not irrational: Sahar police officers sometimes threatened slumdwellers who spoke to me.) Other Annawadians rearranged narratives for psychological solace: giving themselves, in retrospect, more control over an experience than they had had at the time. It was considered inauspicious and counterproductive to dwell on unhappy memories, and Abdul spoke for many of his neighbors when he protested one day, 'Are you dim-witted, Katherine? I told you already three times and you put it in your computer. I have forgotten it now. I want it to stay forgotten. So will you please not ask me again?'" (Boo 252)

On Choosing Good vs. Evil: "It is easy, from a safe distance, to overlook the fact that in under-cities governed by corruption, where exhausted people vie on scant terrain for very little, it is blisteringly hard to be good. The astonishment is that some people are good, and that many people try to be--all those invisible individuals who every day find themselves faced with dilemmas not unlike the one Abdul confronted, stone slab in hand, one July afternoon when his life exploded. If the house is crooked and crumbling, and the land on which it sits uneven, is it possible to make anything lie straight?" (Boo 254)

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Due Tuesday: Remember that the in-class compare/contrast essay between In My Hands and Defiance will take place on this day. You should have prepared for this essay before leaving for break. Ms. Hernberg strongly recommends that you review/update those notes before class on 4/23 so you are ready to hit the ground running at the beginning of class. If you missed any of the viewings, you are responsible for scheduling a make-up viewing before class on Tuesday 4/23. There are two copies of the film in the New Canaan Public Library, and there is one copy in the NCHS library.

Due Wednesday: The first Literature Circles meeting will take place on this day. Be prepared having read the pages your group agreed upon.

Due Friday: Read I Promised I Would Tell chapters 1 & 2.

Due Monday April 29: Complete the brainstorming questions for the Project Project. Submit to Google Classroom.

Due Tuesday April 30: The second Literature Circles meeting will take place on this day. Be prepared having read the pages your group agreed upon.

Class Mon 4/08 - Thurs 4/11; HW due Wed 4/10 & Thurs 4/11; Lit Circles Meeting Wed 4/24

On Monday, we continued discussing In My Hands through page 206 and built on our motif map. We also continued watching Defiance.

On Wednesday, we finished watching Defiance.

On Thursday, we did a close reading of "Amber," held a full-class discussion of In My Hands and Defiance, and prepared for our in-class compare/contrast essay. Ms. Hernberg also gave us our Literature Circles books and we planned due dates for that reading.

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Due Wednesday: Finish reading In My Hands! Be ready to discuss the book in class on Wednesday.

Due Thursday: Prepare for your in-class compare/contrast essay between In My Hands and Defiance. You may come to class on 4/23 with 1) An outline of your essay, 2) Your copy of In My Hands and 3) Your notes from both In My Hands and Defiance. If you missed any of the viewings, you are responsible for scheduling a make-up viewing before class on Tuesday 4/23. There are two copies of the film in the New Canaan Public Library, and there is one copy in the NCHS library.

Due Tuesday April 23: Remember that the in-class compare/contrast essay between In My Hands and Defiance will take place on this day. You should have prepared for this essay before leaving for break. Ms. Hernberg strongly recommends that you review/update those notes before class on 4/23 so you are ready to hit the ground running at the beginning of class. If you missed any of the viewings, you are responsible for scheduling a make-up viewing before class on Tuesday 4/23. There are two copies of the film in the New Canaan Public Library, and there is one copy in the NCHS library.

Due Wednesday April 24: The first Literature Circles meeting will take place on this day. Be prepared having read the pages your group agreed upon.

There is no official homework over Spring Break. However, if you want to use your Literature Circles book as a beach read, feel free! Please enjoy your time to rest and recharge!

Class Mon 4/01 - Thurs 4/04; HW due Wed 4/04 & Fri 4/05

On Monday, we began watching Defiance. We focused our notes on Tuvia's initial characterization, motifs present in the film that are also present in In My Hands, and any questions that occurred to us as we watched.

This class dropped on Tuesday.

On Wednesday, we continued watching Defiance, wrote an exit ticket on how Defiance compares with In My Hands, and had some time to continue reading the book.

On Thursday, we learned about Jewish partisans. Then, we read and discussed the foreword and preface for I Promised I Would Tell. We composed a Reader Response based on the following question: "What does Weitz mean by silence being 'perhaps the most fitting testimony' (Weitz IX)? Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Why?"

On Friday, we watched another 20 minutes of Defiance, discussed In My Hands through page 169 and added to our motif map. We also heard book talks on our Literature Circles options.

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Due Wednesday: Read & take notes on pages 98 - 139 of In My Hands. Pay special attention to the creation of motif.

Due Friday: Read & take notes on pages 140 - 169 of In My Hands. Continue to pay special attention to the creation of motif--build on your previous notes!

Due Monday: Read & take notes on pages 170 - 206 of In My Hands (the end of Part II). Continue to pay special attention to the creation of motif--build on your previous notes!

Broad Motifs in In My Hands:

Bird Imagery

Male Perpetrators

Antisemitism

Religion

Nature

Resistance

Hope

Questioning

Motifs brainstormed by per.8:

Mask

Bird getting killed

Tears

Stars

Gems/amber

Storm wave

River

Confusion

Rescue

Flowers (lilacs)

Home

Low->High

Trees/Forest

Falling

Rain/Weather

Religion/Christianity/Catholicism

Class Mon 3/25 - Fri 3/29; HW due Tues 3/26 - Mon 4/01

On Monday, we continued learning about "active resistance" (violent resistance) in the ghettos and camps, this time focusing on the prisoner/Sonderkommando revolt at Auschwitz-Birkenau. We read and discussed a relevant excerpt from Miklos Nyiszli's Auschwitz: A Doctor's Eyewitness Account.

On Tuesday, we discussed through page 68 (Part I) of In My Hands. We also took an open-note, open-book reading quiz on Part I of the memoir.

On Thursday, we did a close reading of "Tears," the first chapter of In My Hands, and discussed how many of the motifs we see throughout the book are present in this chapter. We also began an activity to explore the interaction between these motifs.

On Friday, we continued our motif map activity, then began work on a reader response.

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Due Tuesday: Read/take notes through page 68 of In My Hands. Pay special attention to the creation of motif.

Due Thursday:

  • Read & take notes on pages 71 - 97 of In My Hands. Continue to pay special attention to the creation of motif.
  • Bring a pair of socks to class.

Due Friday:

  • Bring a pair of socks to class.
  • Go back through your notes on page 97. Highlight/mark specific quotes/observations that will help you contribute to the motif map.

Due Monday: Finish In My Hands Response 2 and submit to Google Classroom.

"Sometimes the easiest resistance is with a gun and a bullet." ~Roman Kent

Class Mon 3/18 - Fri 3/22; HW due Tues 3/19 - Mon 3/18; Final Draft due Wed 3/20

We read and briefly discussed a secondary source summarizing cultural and spiritual resistance. Then, we conducted a full and FINAL peer review session for the NOW thesis essay.

On Tuesday, we continued watching and taking notes on The Pianist. We focused our notes on violent resistance and on how Władek uses music as a form of spiritual resistance.

On Wednesday, we had a mini lesson on apostrophe use to polish up our final drafts. Then, we finished watching The Pianist.

This class dropped on Thursday.

On Friday, after reviewing our draft responses to The Pianist, we learned about "active resistance" (armed/violent resistance) in the ghettos and camps, focusing on the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. We also watched and discussed three testimonies about the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising (Sol Liber, Vladka Meed, and Benjamin Meed). Finally, we handed out and began reading In My Hands: Memories of a Holocaust Rescuer.

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BONUS RESOURCE: Testimonies about spiritual resistance

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Ms. Hernberg strongly recommends that you drop into the Writing Center for help with your NOW thesis essay once you have addressed the feedback she gave on your optional draft due 3/15. Keep in mind that a productive meeting at the Writing Center is the only way you can earn extra credit in this course.

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Due Tuesday: Google Classroom Reflection: Write about a time when you felt the need to act in opposition to others around you, either for moral, religious, or personal reasons. How did you resist the pressure according to others’ behaviors? Were your efforts successful? Why/why not? Why did you feel the need to resist? How did you feel while you were resisting? How did you feel afterwards? Did anyone support or aid you in this endeavor?

Due Wednesday by 10PM: Submit the final draft of your NOW thesis essay to Google Classroom by this time.

Due Friday: Viewer Response: How does Władek change throughout the film, and what are the catalysts for this change? Use specific references to scenes in your response. (approx. 1.5 pages) Submit to Turnitin.

Due Tuesday 3/26: Read/take notes through page 68 of In My Hands. Pay special attention to the creation of motif.

Class Tues 3/12 - Fri 3/15; HW due Wed 3/13 - Mon 3/18; Rough Draft due Thurs 3/14; Final Draft due Wed 3/20

This class dropped on Monday.

Tuesday was a formal peer review conference for the NOW thesis paper. We focused on introductions.

On Wednesday, we learned about the formation of the ghettos, discussed the diaries of Dawid Sierakowiak and Josef Zelkowicz, and continued watching The Pianist.

Thursday was a work day for the NOW thesis paper (changed from the originally-planned peer conference day). We also reviewed how to write an effective conclusion.

Friday was a formal peer review conference for the NOW thesis paper. We also listened to a NPR story on Dmitri Shostakovich's Symphony No.7 and the Siege of Leningrad and discussed the power of music as a form of spiritual resistance, particularly with regard to The Pianist. Finally, we listened to survivor Roman Kent's testimony of types of resistance in the ghettos.

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Conferencing for the thesis essay on The Nazi Officer's Wife will take place on March 12, 13, and 14. This conference is required. By the time you come to the conference, you should have addressed Ms. Hernberg's feedback on your initial outline. Come to the conference with a point of focus for discussion.

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Due Wednesday: Read the diary of Dawid Sierakowiak, then read the Josef Zelkowicz diary entry. Answer six of the eight questions attached to the Google Classroom post ("Ghetto - Diary Entries") in one paragraph each, using textual evidence.

Due Thursday: Come to class with a full rough draft of your N.O.W. essay.

Due Friday:

  • By Class Time: Come to class with a full rough draft of your N.O.W. essay. Be ready for peer review.
  • By 10PM: OPTIONAL DUE DATE: If you wish to receive additional feedback on your next NOW thesis essay draft, you must submit it to Turnitin by this time. Please note that if you choose to resubmit for additional feedback, you must have already addressed the feedback she gave you during conferencing! No late submissions will be accepted.

Due Wednesday 3/20 by 10PM: Submit the final draft of your NOW thesis essay to Turnitin by this time.

Topics to be Discussed During Our Reading of The Nazi Officer's Wife:

Love vs. religion

Slave owners vs. worker's savior

Converting

Feminist behavior

Heroic deeds vs. simple kindness

Machismo

Fear

Survivor's guilt

Nature symbolism

Class Tues 3/05 - Fri 3/08; HW due Wed 3/06 - Mon 3/11; Draft due Tues 3/12

Monday was a snow day - no school!

On Tuesday, continued watching The Pianist, shared our homework responses from The Nazi Officer's Wife, and reviewed requirements for the NOW thesis paper

On Wednesday, we shared our questions, connections, and observations from the first part of The Pianist. We examined the Nazi Party Platform of 1920 and discussed the appeal and the danger of the "25-points." We also watched and discussed a few visual testimonies on Antisemitism in Germany.

On Thursday, we conducted a peer review session on the drafted thesis statements. We also briefly reviewed topic sentence structure.

On Friday, we reviewed introduction structure and the concept of a "so what." We also read and discussed excerpts from Anne Frank's diary. Anne Frank was arrested and deported from her hiding place in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and died of typhus in Bergen-Belsen at the age of fifteen. We then briefly discussed the following question: "Reflect on at least one of the excerpts from Anne Frank’s diary. Is she mature or immature in her thinking? What do these excerpts reveal about her character? Do you agree/disagree with her sentiments, and why?"

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Due Thursday:

Due Friday:

  • Revise your thesis statement based on peer feedback.
  • Compose and submit an outline to Google Classroom for Ms. Hernberg's feedback. This outline should include:
    • Your revised thesis statement.
    • 2-4 topic sentences.
    • At least six (cited) quotes.

Due Tuesday March 12:

  • By 7AM: Sign up for a conference with Ms. Hernberg for your thesis essay on The Nazi Officer's Wife. The sign-up sheet will be sent to your email over the weekend, and conferences will take place March 12, 13, and 14. This conference is required. By the time you come to the conference, you should have addressed Ms. Hernberg's feedback on your initial outline. Come to the conference with a point of focus for discussion.
  • By Class Time: Come to class with a draft of your N.O.W. essay. Your draft must include, at minimum, the following items:
    • An introduction (with revised thesis statement).
    • Revised topic sentences.
    • At least 6 (cited) quotes.
    • At least one body paragraph.
    • A "so what."

Class Mon 2/25 - Fri 3/01; HW due Tues 2/26 - Mon 3/04

On Monday, we discussed our learning from the online exhibition on Nazi propaganda and censorship. We also watched and discussed part of a Nazi pseudo-documentary propaganda film, Der Ewige Jude ("The Eternal Jew"). Der Ewige Jude was pieced together using mislabeled footage, staged scenes, and elaborately misleading, distorted, and made-up "facts," all of which were meant to emotionally set up German citizens for an acceptance of the eventual slaughter of the Jewish people.

On Tuesday, we held a discussion on the first seven chapters of The Nazi Officer's Wife using our homework responses to get us started.

This class dropped on Wednesday.

On Thursday, we shared our quotes from chapters 8 - 10 of The Nazi Officer's Wife. We also continues our learning about propaganda by examining images from a propaganda book for children, which is illustrated with astonishingly anti-Semitic drawings, as well as additional visual examples of Antisemitic propaganda. Finally, we read and discussed a secondary source on the Weimar Republic and the Rise of the Nazi Party.

On Friday, we reviewed the differences between communism, socialism, fascism, and nationalism and discussed the role of jingoism in terms of the rise of the Nazi Party. Then, we began watching The Pianist.

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Due Tuesday: NOW Reflection 1 - Develop and answer an open-ended question about chapters 1-7. You can find the questions attached to the corresponding Google Classroom assignment. Use at least 3 cited quotes, and be sure not to concentrate all of your quotes from just one part of the book. This should be about a page, just as with any traditional reader-response entry.

Due Thursday: Read/annotate chapters 8, 9, and 10 of Edith Hahn Beer's memoir, The Nazi Officer's Wife. Remember to find at least TWO QUOTES PER CHAPTER that you are ready to discuss in class on Thursday.

Due Monday:

  • Read/annotate chapters 11 and 12 of The Nazi Officer's Wife.
  • NOW Reflection 2 - Google Classroom Reflection: (1 - 1.5 pages; use quotes to support your analysis) CHOOSE ONE:
  1. The men in this book—Pepi and Werner—come across as weak and cowardly compared to the strength of the women, both Jewish and Christian—Edith, her mother, Frau Docktor Maria Niderall, Christl Denner Beran, even Werner’s ex-wife Elisabeth. Would you describe this as a feminist book as well as a Holocaust memoir? Explain.
  2. There are many degrees of heroism in this story—from the Bestehorn forewoman’s advice on how to make Edith’s impossible work quota to Christl’s gift of her identity. Discuss other acts of kindness in the book and whether or not you regard them as heroic deeds.
  3. As Edith lives her life as Grete, an ordinary hausfrau, she is in constant fear that her Jewish identity will be discovered. Is there a particular incident in the book where you share her fear?

Class Monday 2/11 - Thurs 2/14; HW due Tues 2/12 - Thurs 2/28

On Monday, we continued our Not in Our Town presentations, then continued reading The Nazi Officer's Wife.

Tuesday was a snow day - NO SCHOOL!

On Wednesday, we read and discussed a summary of Antisemitism. We discussed race as a social/cultural construct. For more information on this topic, please see these resources:

We also finished our Not in Our Town presentations on Wednesday.

On Thursday, we brainstormed open-ended discussion questions on the first seven chapters of The Nazi Officer's Wife. Then, we explored an online exhibition on Nazi propaganda and censorship and ended the period with an exit ticket: "What is the most important thing about propaganda/censorship you learned in class today? What question(s) do you still have?"

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Due Tuesday: Read/annotate chapters 6 and 7 of Edith Hahn Beer's memoir, The Nazi Officer's Wife.

Due Thursday: Bring your BYOD electronic device, a pair of headphones, and your copy of The Nazi Officer's Wife to class.

There is no homework over Winter Break. Please enjoy your time to rest and recharge! In case you want to use some of your resting time to read, below I've listed the next reading due date once we return from break:

Due Thursday, February 28:

  • Read/annotate chapters 8, 9, and 10 of Edith Hahn Beer's memoir, The Nazi Officer's Wife.
  • We will have some more discussion and finish the book by Tuesday, March 5.

Class Mon 2/04 - Fri 2/08; HW due Tues 2/05 - Tues 2/12; Project due Fri 2/08

On Monday, we continued our discussion of the Kristallnacht texts, and students received copies of The Nazi Officer's Wife.

On Tuesday, we began class with a reading check for chapters 1 and 2 of The Nazi Officer's Wife. Then, we discussed these chapters.

On Wednesday, we read and discussed testimony from Walter Plywaski, a survivor of the Lodz ghetto, Auschwitz, and Dachau. Here is the link to Plywaski's biography. For more on Plywaski, view this video interview (start the interview at 1:24), read this article from the Intermountain Jewish News, or listen to this story on Colorado Public Radio. We also continued discussing The Nazi Officer's Wife through chapter 3.

This class dropped on Thursday.

Friday was a presentation day for the Not in Our Town projects.

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Due Tuesday: Read/annotate chapters 1 and 2 of Edith Hahn Beer's memoir, The Nazi Officer's Wife. For Chapter 1, focus on the interactions between the nurses and patients as told through Edith’s inner dialogue and thoughts. What does this tell you about what conditions were like during the war? How does it help you to begin to get a sense of Edith’s voice and what she was going through at the time? For Chapter 2, pay attention to new learning about Jewish life prior to the war. Use sticky note annotations to select TWO QUOTES PER CHAPTER that you will be ready to discuss in class.

Due Wednesday: Read/annotate chapter 3 of Edith Hahn Beer's memoir, The Nazi Officer's Wife. As you read, pay special attention to the roles in women in Austria during this time period. Remember to find at least TWO QUOTES PER CHAPTER that you are ready to discuss in class on Thursday.

Due Friday: Your Not in Our Town presentations will take place in class on this day.

Due Monday: Read/annotate chapters 4 and 5 of Edith Hahn Beer's memoir, The Nazi Officer's Wife. As you read, pay special attention to the roles in women in Austria during this time period. Remember to find at least TWO QUOTES PER CHAPTER that you are ready to discuss in class on Thursday.

Class Tues 1/29 - Fri 2/01; HW due Wed 1/30 - Mon 2/04; Presentation due Fri 2/08

This class dropped on Monday.

On Tuesday, we took the syllabus quiz, discussed our homework responses, and reflected on a quote by Martin Niemoller. We also reviewed the Pyramid of Hate and discussed key dates to remember. Finally, we reviewed the difference between primary and secondary sources.

On Wednesday, we watched and discussed video testimony on Kristallnacht by Kurt Messerschmidt, a survivor of the Theresienstadt ghetto, Auschwitz-Birkenau, and the work camp Golleschau. For a biography of Messerschmidt, visit the Echoes and Reflections website. For a selected transcript of another interview with Messerschmidt, see this newsletter from the Taos Jewish Center of New Mexico. For the complete four-hour video interview (we watched approx. 57:40 - 1:03:04), visit the Shoah Foundation YouTube site. We also read/examined and discussed the following texts on Kristallnacht:

Thursday was a work day for the Not in Our Town projects. We met in ColLab B to review MLA 8 format and how to find reliable sources. We learned about the different types of projects that can be done using the resources in the library with our Not in Our Town topics and projects in mind.

On Friday, we continued discussion of the Kristallnacht texts.

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Due Wednesday:

  • Read over the Not in Our Town assignment sheet. Begin thinking about possible topics and come to class with any questions you may have.
  • Intro Response 4 (minimum 3 paragraphs, one per source, submitted to Google Classroom): Think of any event that you have lived through. This event could be as universal as a presidential election or as personal as an illness in the family. Choose three SPECIFIC primary sources that could tell the story of this event to your grandchildren, and explain (in one paragraph each) why each of these sources is appropriate an representative of the event. For a list of types of primary sources, you can visit this website.

Due Thursday:

  • Choose a topic for the Not in Our Town project.
  • Come to class prepared to work on your Not in Our Town project.

Due Friday: Compile at least five reliable sources you plan to use for your Not in Our Town project. Be ready to submit a hyperlink and an explanation of each source.

Due Monday: If you were unable to do so in class Friday, please finish completing the "Not in Our Town Resources" Google Form (sent to your email).

Due Friday, February 8: Your Not in Our Town presentations will take place in class on this day.

Class Thurs 1/24 & Fri 1/25; HW due Fri 1/25 & Tues 1/28

After introductions on Thursday, we began reviewed the syllabus and heard brief "book talks" about the texts we will be reading for this course. We also reflected (in writing and discussion) on the question, "What thoughts and feelings come to mind when you hear reference to the Holocaust?" (Intro Response 1)

On Friday, we experienced a presentation on the "Holocaust by the Numbers." We reflected on the question on the last slide of the presentation by examining definitions of "genocide" and "Holocaust" (Intro Response 2).

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Due Friday:

  • Bookmark this website!
  • Accept Ms. Hernberg's invitation to Google Classroom if you have not already done so.
  • Set up email forwarding if you do not habitually check your school email.

Due Tuesday:

  • Study for the syllabus quiz.
  • Read and sign your syllabus, and have your parent/guardian read and sign it as well.
  • Intro Response 3 (1 paragraph, submitted to Google Classroom) Choose One:
    • Why do you think people are often unwilling to speak out when they see something wrong?
    • What are the dangers of being silent in the face of injustice?