A Different Kettle of Fish

"In this book Michael describes a day trip from the comfort of his familiar environment on the university campus to the hustle and bustle of central London. His depiction of his logical world makes one realise just how incomprehensible we must be to people with autism. His examples of indirect questions are truly eye-opening. For example, when I was on the phone once and the doorbell rang I called to Michael “I’m on the phone”. He had absolutely no idea that I really meant ‘Please will you answer the door’."

Taken from the foreword, by Delia Barton

Reviews

"It is certainly unique and I have never read anything like this before. This book is a good read both for parents and children alike and should be compulsory reading in school, giving you a great insight not just into the life of autistic people but also to make you realise how things can be seen differently by people with disabilities."

London Mums Magazine - 25 September 2014


"This book should be compulsory reading for adults and children, you are given a glimpse into the world of an Autist (Michael's term) that makes you realise that life can be very difficult for some in society, this realisation could help make our world a better place for all, not just those with disabilities."

Read me and open the door to Autism. - 20 July 2014

John Tyler, from Amazon.co.uk


"Unique book, unique style, unique story"

Review from Amazon.com


'Michael Barton has - once again - produced a beautiful and funny book, with his own fresh perspective on the bizarre idioms of the English language, rendering them more comprehensible to people on the autism spectrum. His attractive illustrations break up the text and the result is a gem of a slim book.'

Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology, Director of the Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge


'I loved Michael's book “It's Raining Cats and Dogs” and now this book gives us further insight into the complexities of our use of language and how it is assumed we understand the illogicality of ambiguous expressions. The book describes Michael's journey through a day out in London with all the pitfalls of potential miscommunication. The book is witty and fun to read and captures Michael's very positive outlook to life.'

Dr Judith Gould, Director, The NAS Lorna Wing Centre for Autism


'Fascinating! On the one hand this book describes a journey into London through the eyes of a young man with autism, but beneath the surface is a voyage of self-discovery as Michael addresses his autism head-on and finds his place in the world. Highly recommended.'

Jerry Hughes, CEO, Burgess Autistic Trust