Freezing & Canning Cookbook

Front Jacket Photo By George Faraghan Studios

Hardcover, First Edition, 352 pages

Published 1963 by Doubleday & Company, Inc.

Freezing & Canning Cookbook

by Nell B. Nichols

Text from the slipcover:By the Food Editors of Farm Journal16 pages of four-color photographsMore than 1000 recipesCountry women have always been known for their well-stocked pantries. With vegetables harvested at top succulence, fruits ripened by the sun, and barnyard animals fed until sleek and prime, good food is at home on farm tables.This third Farm Journal cookbook provides complete directions for preserving food and putting it away for future use. It includes many recipes for using this home-preserved food to make appetizing dishes and nutritive, attractive meals.Even town women who have no gardens or orchards - nor a fisherman or hunter in the family - can use these recipes and secrets of farm women to transform commercial frozen and canned foods into unforgettable meals.The "how-to-do" sections give complete, up to date information on all methods of home freezing, canning, and curing of meat, based on the latest research findings of the U.D. Department of Agriculture and the University Agricultural Experiment Stations at the state Land Grant colleges, supplemented with "slick tricks" farm women have developed for savings time and work.The "how-to-use" sections contain more than 1000 of the best recipes submitted by Farm Journal readers all over the country - thoroughly kitchen-tested by the magazine's home economists. The reader learns how to prepare delicious casseroles, breads, cakes, pies, and complete meals that can be frozen and then quickly heated and served later. Complete directions for using home-preserved foods in new and exciting dishes cover everything from appetizers to desserts - even snacks.This attractively illustrated book is a comprehensive guide to freezing and canning and a useful year-round cookbook. It has the practical "down-to-earth" quality for which farm women are noted.NELL B. NICHOLS, who edited this Freezing and Canning Cookbook, is Field Food Editor for the Farm Journal. Home economist, homemaker, journalist, and lover of good food, she travels the United States, talking to farm women to uncover interesting and easy ways to prepare the good food for which country kitchens are famous.Mrs. Nichols is also the editor of Farm Journal's two other cookbooks, the Country Cookbook and the Time-saving Country cookbook, which are being used by nearly half a million homemakers. Back Jacket Photo ByBob Hawks and Mel Richman, Inc.
Freezing & Canning Cookbook


Layered Jelly with its mingled fruit flavors and beautiful colors makes wonderful Christmas gifts (recipe, page 176). Guests will admire the color array when the sparkling jelly shimmers in the serving dish.

Choice pickles from country kitchens -- Minted Onion Rings and Extra-Good Dills (recipes, pages 268, 283) represent the many wonderful "sours" in the pickle chapter. A superior collection!

Freezing & Canning

COOKBOOK

Prized Recipes from the Farms of America

Edited by

Nell B. Nichols

Field Food Editors

FARM JOURNAL


Doubleday & Company, Inc.

Garden City, New York


Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 63-7484

Copyright © 1963 by Farm Journal, Inc.

All Rights Reserved

Printed in the United States of America

CONTENTS

What You Will Find in this Cookbook .................................

Freezing Foods at Home ......................................................

Chapter 1 Slick Freezing Tricks ............................................

Chapter 2 Fruits and Vegetables .........................................

Chapter 3 Meat, Poultry, Fish, and Game ..........................

Chapter 4 Dairy Foods and Eggs .........................................

Chapter 5 Homemade Breads .............................................

Chapter 6 Cakes, Cookies, and Pies ....................................

Chapter 7 Main Dishes ..........................................................

Chapter 8 Soups, Salads, and Sandwiches .........................

Home Canning .......................................................................

Chapter 9 Jams, Jellies, and Other Spreads ........................

Chapter 10 Fruit Juices to Can and Freeze..........................

Chapter 11 Fruits and Vegetables .......................................

Chapter 12 Meat, Poultry, and Game..................................

Chapter 13 Pickles .................................................................

Chapter 14 Fruit Pickles and Relishes .................................

Chapter 15 Curing Meat, Poultry, and Fish .........................

Index .......................................................................................

5

11

17

31

53

68

79

101

125

148

159

164

220

231

253

262

296

316

333

COLOR ILLUSTRATIONS

All photographs created by Farm Journal Food and Art Staffs

Jacket design by Al Reagan, Farm Journal Art Department

Mel Richman, Inc., Photographer:

      • Midwinter Jellies Frontispiece
      • Pickles Frontispiece
      • Pickles Facing page 64
      • Ketchup Facing page 96
      • Strawberry Sherbert Facing page 128
      • Breads Facing page 129
      • Lemon Meringue Pie Facing page 160
      • Crab Apple Pie Facing page 193
      • Beef Cuts Facing page 224

Peter Dant Studios

    • Jams, Jellies, Relishes Facing page 65
    • Rocky Mountain Cake Facing page 192

Tom Meehan, Photographer:

    • Mincemeat Facing page 97

Hoedt Studios, Photographer:

      • Cake Rolls Facing page 161

George Faraghan Studios, Photographer:

        • Roast Chicken Facing page 225
        • Venison Facing page 288
        • Broccoli Soufflé Facing page 289

What You Will Find in This Cookbook

Country women always have been known for the pantry they keep. With vegetables harvested at top succulence, fruits ripened by the sun and barn-yard animals fed until sleek and prime, good food is at home on the farm tables. The pioneer’s need to extend summer’s fullness throughout the year has become instinctive- not just a means to save surpluses. Food preservation is a flowering home art and a part of our culture too satisfying to discard.

This cookbook, filled with long-time country favorites—many of them consistently blue ribbon winners at fairs—is a testimonial to farm women. We have included not only their excellent recipes for putting up food in jars and freezers but also hundreds of their unmatched recipes for baking and cooking with frozen and canned foods. Recipes that will work for you and enhance your hostess reputation even if you don't can or freeze.

Look through the first chapter in this cookbook at the original slick freezing tricks from country homemakers, for instance. See how gourmet cooks freeze the herbs they grow, fresh ginger root they buy. Notice how busy women put just-ripe apples in their freezers for making springtime applesauce with that wonderful, late-summer taste—how they buy or bake several kinds of bread, wrap slices of different kinds together to freeze for mealtime choices.

Making jellies, jams, preserves and pickles for canning and freezing is important in country cooking. Farm homemakers treasure and use heirloom recipes. But they constantly refine and adapt them to new ingredients, such as powdered and liquid fruit pectins, vinegars with standardized acid content, and new utensils and appliances. This cookbook contains a carefully selected collection of these recipes, hundreds of them prize and praise winners. Exhibits at county and state fairs and the country table are the farm cook's display showcases.

Even if you live in town and have no garden, orchard, berry patch or livestock—no fisherman or hunter in your family—you can use the recipes in

6 WHAT YOU WILL FIND IN THIS COOKBOOK

this book with frozen and canned foods you buy. You can get a marvelous flavor in meats, for instance, by kitchen-curing them right in your refrigerator. You will find ways to use home and commercially preserved foods the year round. the farm woman freezes and cans foods, the aromas of dill heads and simmering, spicy vinegar-sugar solutions remind her of winter days ahead—of church suppers, family reunions, Christmas gifts and bazaars where homemade food is at a premium.

How did this cookbook come to be? It started with FARM JOURNAL's readers. Whenever we print recipes for jams, jellies and relishes, for instance, thoughtful readers will write to share with us some of the traditional sweets and sours they make. Their letters inspired us to invite all our readers to share their best jelly, jam and pickle recipes. We received more than 30,000!

At the same time, most of the letter writers paid tribute to home freezers, telling us how they dovetail their freezing and canning operations for maximum results. Their comments spurred us on—we asked our readers for their favorite freezing recipes and slick tricks. Again letters, letters, letters! So as country women stockpile food in their homes, we were stockpiling superior recipes in our offices and Test Kitchens. With many thousands more than we could print in FARM JOURNAL, we started to think about this cookbook.

We sorted and tested recipes and then sent them to homemakers trained in home economics, from Washington to California, Virginia to Maine, to try in their kitchens with fruits and vegetables in their different parts of the country. We taste-tested samples they sent back to us and compared reactions with our own Test Kitchen results. In the meantime, we collected the most popular dishes to freeze from the state food specialists at the universities and colleges and added them to recipes developed in our Countryside Kitchens.

A cookbook with splendid recipes is valuable, but not complete when freezing and canning are involved. We remembered the letters some readers sent us about their failures in food preservation. We felt we needed to give up-to-date techniques of handling foods for freezing and canning. So this cookbook is also a "refresher course" for homemakers already experienced in storing food, and a guide to brides and to women who have moved from city to country and have the new delight of home-grown food.

7 WHAT YOU WILL FIND IN THIS COOKBOOK

We asked our 500 Family Test Group members whether they would find this kind of cookbook useful. They not only said "Yes!" but gave good reasons. One homemaker put it this way: "It would save me from looking through clippings, notebooks, files and cabinet drawers trying to locate timetables and recipes when I want to hurry food into the freezer or canning jars. It would be so handy to have all the information I need in one book. And if there are new and better ways, I want to use them."

So here is your convenience book, filled with up-to-the-minute, how-to information and exceptionally good recipes from champion cooks. We feel that many a town woman, who likes to put unforgettable good meals on her table, will be pleased with these farm women's secrets. For instance, where else would you find old-fashioned recipes for berry preserves cooked by sunshine, sweet corn dried outdoors for the traditional Thanksgiving dinner?

This cookbook could not have been compiled without the research that has been done by the Department of Agriculture and the state Land Grant colleges. Special recognition must go to Shirley Trantanella Munson, Institute of Agriculture, University of Minnesota, who consulted with us on the freezing chapters. The extra-good recipes from farm homemakers, from home economists who work with country women and from FARM JOURNAL'S own food staff make this cookbook an exciting one. The lovely color photographs were produced by FARM JOURNAL'S Food and Art Departments.

We hope you like this book. Good luck in freezing and canning! Good Reading—and happy cooking.

NELL B. NICHOLS

Field Food Editor

Freezing & Canning

COOKBOOK

Prized Recipes from the Farms of America

Freezing Foods at Home


Freezer Management • Steps to Successful Freezing • Packaging

Materials • Correct Packaging • When the Freezer Stops

• Refreezing Foods • Nutritive Value of Frozen Foods • Quantity

Freezers Will Hold • Freezing Costs • Defrosting Nonautomatics


Country cooking never was so good as it is today. That's what people who sit down to farm meals say. Ask the cooks why and they agree that fresh-tasting frozen foods have much to do with it. They also like the dollars-and-cents savings—freezers take farm products when they're most plentiful and at their best and keep them fresh for months. And busy women find it's less work to freeze than to can, and to freeze meats rather than to cure them.

The four farm-to-freezer favorites of FARM JOURNAL readers are fruits, vegetables, meats and poultry. And the two greatest from-supermarket-to-freezer favorites on the farm are ice cream and bread. With such a stockpile, farm kitchens today are miniature markets; shopping trips to town can be less frequent.

Frozen foods add variety to meals because just about everything is available around the calendar—fresh meats in July; young, tender chickens to fry in January. Combining foods seasonal at different times is cooking adventure our grandmothers could not enjoy. "You get some wonderful flavor blends," one farm woman says. "It's like discovering a brand-new food no one ever tasted before."

Smart homemakers cook, bake and shop for their freezers on less busy days to distribute their work loads. Dishes to heat or thaw-and-serve make no-watch meals when there's little time to stay in the kitchen. And they help women to feed unexpected people without fuss and worry, to entertain graciously and to take the right food to church bazaars, community suppers and home economics extension club teas.

Thumb through the pages on freezing that follow for up-to-date directions. Don't miss the clever slick tricks of smart farm women. And do try the recipes using the freezer and its contents if you like compliments on your cooking.