Palomar Globular Clusters

The Palomar Globular Clusters are a unique and challenging list of 15 very faint globular clusters. Most of these were only found after scrutinizing plates from the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS). I stumbled upon one of these clusters while looking around in Starry Night Pro and building a list of targets for my next observing session. It took several imaging sessions to capture my first Palomar Globular.

The web site http://www.deepsky-visuell.de/Projekte/PalomarGC_E.htm - offers a photographic view and sketch of each of the Palomar globulars as well as a table reference.

Palling Around With Palomar Globular Clusters, by Bob King, August 17, 2016 at Sky and Telescope Magazine (https://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/palling-around-with-the-palomar-globular-clusters/) offers a nice article on the Palomar clusters, photographs and finder charts.

Astronomy-Mall also contains helpful observation information and a table of the Palomar Clusters at (http://www.astronomy-mall.com/Adventures.In.Deep.Space/palglob.htm).

Below is a Google Sheet of data I found from several sources.

Palomar Globulars

The information above has been combined from several sources, thus the size of each object is given as a range. The items highlighted in blue have been imaged (thus far). Below shows my attempts to image these elusive globular clusters.

The dim reddish object in this image is the globular cluster named Palomar 2 (PAL2). It has an apparent magnitude of 13.04 and measures about 2.2’. It took me six nights of attempts on this - I hard a hard time spotting in test exposures to get it centered. Tech Specs: Meade 12” LX90, Celestron CGEM-DX mount, Canon 6D stock camera, Antares Focal Reducer, ISO 3200, 32 x 60 seconds using Backyard EOS with darks, bias and flat frames, guided using an Orion 60mm guide scope with an attached ZWO ASI290MC camera. Image Date: December 20, 2017. Location: The Dark Side Observatory in Weatherly, PA.