Reviews

From Robert via Linked In

Hi Evan, I have just worked my way through disc 1 of your course, somewhat slowly I confess. I want to congratulate you on your teaching. You are the finest Latin teacher I have encountered. I began this as a revision of the A Level course I did at school over 50 years ago. I am about to embark on Disc 2 and look forward to the day when | can read Livy's Histories as readily as I did all those years ago, Thank you Robert


From C.M. (Via email) Just an email to say 'Thank you so much...'! I've always sporadically taken to trying to teach myself to read Latin passing various courses such as the Open University Latin and Continuing Latin courses only to have a pause and forget much of what it has taken me so much trouble to learn. Since I have discovered the resources that you have been generous enough to provide I have started from 'The Portal to the Gate of Tongues' and have feel that I have been learning much more effectively and enjoyably. Not only have I found it a lot easier to acquaint myself with lots of new vocabulary, I have found it hard to stop; when I get tired from listening to your audio supplement to The Portal, I still have stamina enough to do some reading. I am a massive fan! I'm looking forward to spending the next few years in your company as my online tutor (and Comenius's) - so inspirational!!

With very warm regards,

C.M.



+Jamie Flynn (YouTube) Hi Evan,

I enjoy your Latin videos very much and appreciate and admire your steadfast dedication to the language. You also have one of the best pronunciations that I can find on the internet, and I have a quick question: what are the rules regarding circumflex accents in Latin? When are all the instances that vowels acquire a circumflex? Thanks.

My Answer: +Jamie Flynn You should find the answer here: https://sites.google.com/site/latiumredivivum/home/journal/journal007



M. Brennan (YouTube) Very well said. My teacher refuses to speak Latin in class, and we are forced to seek out each word and force the Latin into English sentences when we translate. I have always wanted to become fluent in Latin and have become frustrated how it is taught as a jigsaw puzzle rather than a living language. I really appreciate your Alder course and the videos you put up daily.



From EntMiami (YouTube) Thank you. You are awesome. I have been trying to teach myself Latin over the last year, and your lectures have been invaluable. 



From Quasus Adler's A Practical Grammar of the Latin Language can be of special interest for you because it teaches to use the language actively. And if you decide on it, Latinum can prove very profitable. Adler's A Practical Grammar of the Latin Language is in English and is not subject to copyright any longer. Many claim that it's the best textbook that has ever existed.



From Matthaeus Adler's book is really the best out there for practical purposes mostly, even though it dates from the mid-nineteenth century; it even includes a key to the grammar exercises. Betake yourself to Latinum and download it. Thanks to that website I have tremendously increased my vocabulary and speaking skills. Utinam aliquem latine loquentem invenirem.


This really gave me an impetus to study further. Grammar, colloquial, spoken Latin, and original classical quotations in audio form are all included. The textbook used may be somewhat outdated (1858), but don't let that distract you.


I've used the famous Latinum course, which helped greatly with grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. It uses an old textbook, but it's worth the trouble if you're serious about learning.




From Jim!!!! Latinum is a rare gem of a site for learning Latin. It is a phenomenal compilation of many drill podcasts. You must go through Adler methodically as suggested by the creator/developer. Exercise patience with Latin as it is different from other languages! It's not an overnight achievement! It will come in time and so you will have to go through the work patiently. Overall it is worth it. Get a tutor and you'll pay through the nose! Thank you Latinum!


Absolutely wonderful! Some of us on You-Tube are trying to do something similar with Ancient Greek, but yours is more complete and systematic than anything we have so far. Keep it up. The fact that someone can simply watch your videos and really improve their Latin is fantastic. That you make this free for all is exactly what You Tube is all about. May God continue to bless your efforts. As we, your Greek brethren say, ευχαριστω σοι. 




Todd Several weeks ago I purchased the 'Audio Visual Latin' DVDs (1-3). I wanted to

let you know that I am really enjoying your videos- great job! I really appreciate your hard work.


Thanks for putting these videos together, you certainly have a talent for teaching, not only am I learning but I am also amused at your creativity, and of course, by your friend the dinosaur!




Sheremet (from his Amazon review of Adler) I'd also recommend Adler's "Practical Latin Grammar," which is out of print, but nonetheless available on Google Books.Adler's textbook is especially good as a supplement to "Lingua Latina," since it eventually covers every important point of grammar, including complex subordination. It's focused on *conversational* Latin, which forces the student to generate and verbalize good Latin sentences from the very beginning. The entire book has been rendered into audio by Evan Millner. In this way, you're doing two things: you're practicing complex prose with proper reading skills with Orberg's book, and practicing listening and speaking Latin with Adler and Millner.



An article criticizing the typical Latin-teaching approaches mentioned something interesting and revealing: in the Renaissance, students were first taught conversational Latin for five or six years before ever cracking open some Caesar or Cicero. And only years later, perhaps, did they ever touch poetry. Doesn't this seem sensible? To truly understand a language, or even to simply be competent enough to read at a decent speed, from the start of a sentence to the end, without juggling endless case endings and objects in your mind, requires this kind of approach. Sure, if you're doing Latin academically, there may be no time -- you're expected to have decoded at least a couple of hundred of pages of Latin by the time you hit your Ph.D. stage, in some schools. But, if you're interested in doing well and improving every day, and visibly, for that matter, forget about Latin literature for as long as you can tolerate it, and start with the basics: easy reading, and conversation.




From Caeser13 There's Latinum, which is just Latin readings. I usually fall asleep listening either to this, or to an audiobook from Latinum. Recently, it's been the Latin. It's a great resource.



From Mat I used to listen to the Corderius and Comenius and do a dictation by pausing and listening over and over and over, then checking myself. Thanks to that I have gained considerable fluency.




From David I have been trying to learn Latin off and on for the last 20 years. There is no particular reason for wanting to do this, other than that the language appeals to me. Visiting Rome last year only intensified my desire to study it. Thus, this site was a godsend. It is, admittedly, not easy material. For those planning to use it, I recommend that they first get a copy of Adler's book, as well as the answer key -- they help immensely - (NOTE: the pdf is supplied in all the downloads)

The amount of work that is involved in setting up a site like this is amazing -- my experience with much less ambitious projects, only underscores my sense of awe at what Evan Millner has accomplished. I hope this project will continue to grow.




Steve of NN VA Mr. Millner has done amazing work creating and posting these audio materials online. His passion for and dedication to the Latin language really shine through. I still find it incredible that someone would take up such a task. If you have an interest in learning in Latin or at least wish to see it spared the fate of being a truly 'dead' language, start to use these materials.


This is a course intended for serious study, so you won't be able to just tune in and get something from it - a little preparation is necessary. The lectures follow the course laid out in the Adler textbook, so you must get the Adler textbook to make use of the lectures. The text is available for free from Google.


This is a superior resource - Latin teachers are hard to find in a lot of places; this podcast with the associated resources can actually teach you well enough to make up for the lack of a teacher provided you dedicate yourself to it. Bravo, Mr. Millner!




From Porodzilus I learned Latin in school. After several years out I realized I had forgotten how to say anything in Latin. What I did remember was the endings and just enough grammar. Now I use Latinum . The rapid vocabulary drills along with study of grammar in reading has lead to a dramatic increase in my ability in just 3 months.


What happened? We stopped teaching it as a language. We started teaching it as a code to be read and to make perfect translations. You need to get the classroom engaged in speaking the language and hearing it. There is no need to always memorize 4 principal parts when you can hear the vowel systems. Latin still requires a lot of grammar and translation drills. But I think in the second year of instruction you should start to really hear it a lot more.


Students will make mistakes. But hearing the correct way over and over will eventually correct them.and by learning a language with the ear you will learn to understand it faster as your ear forces you to interpret it faster.


Faster translations = more fun. fix mistakes later, but you will always be sure of what you do know if you are learning it by ear.




From Nikolaus Latinum is a good course. If you want a really good free textbook, there is Adler's Grammar and its answer key.

Adler's grammar starts from the very beginning, and builds up grammatical skills gradually, and vocabulary is introduced VERY slowly. The result is that you should have a solid foundation on grammar, but will rely on dictionaries for a while. (Which is why I recommend listening to the Vestibulum and Orbis alongside Adler -EM)

Hurin:

I've downloaded Adler materials, and Audio Vocabulary as whole.

I do listen it every day, several times each lesson. I am currently on Pensum X




From Senor Smile I have had a love for the Latin language since I was 11. I am now 25 and have learned several languages to varying degrees of fluency (from advanced beginner to basic fluency). Latin, however, the first language I fell in love with, has forever eluded my grasp. I believe part of the reason for this is the lack of people to speak it with and a lack of good resources. I believe both of these are just excuses though. There are plenty of people, especially via the internet, with whom to speak. And there are enough resources out there to become fluent. So, I intend to use some of the methods that I have picked up from these forums and other places and apply these to the resources that I have at my disposal. I am starting over from the beginning. Thanks to Latinum, we have what appears to be a huge resource available to anyone with an internet connection.




From Nick I listen to the audio from time to time to improve my pronunciation and listening skills.


Right now, I am indebted to you for your recommendation (Adler's grammar), and after I finish the book I would like to dedicate more time to the recordings.


Along with Adler's "Practical Grammar" and Latinum, I use the word study tool on perseus.tufts.edu, Nodictionaries.com, Wiktionary (on occasion), and the Latin Forum.

Before Adler's grammar, I used a decent (but that's it) textbook in an inferior curriculum, and considered buying the second book in that series for self-study.


Your dedication to teaching people worldwide Latin is amazing! I am so impressed with your work! I can't even begin to count how many hours you've spent creating all these wonderful episodes. I love the innovative method you use to teach, stressing the development of good vocabulary before tackling grammar...the opposite of most text books!


Keep up the good work, and I'll be sure to keep following your episodes!




From C Hook This is an excellent supplement (or alternative) to reading-only Latin learning approaches. I've taken several years of Latin in college, but felt that my fluency had plateaued. I was looking for something that would bring in other learning modes (listening and speaking) instead of the traditional reading-only method. Latinum was exactly what I was looking for and it has helped me move forward. Plus, it is something I can do while I'm driving or taking a walk. I really appreciate all the hard work it must have taken to put this together



From E Steen

This Latinum (Adler) course is not only for advanced Latin students-- though it's easy to make that mistake as some advanced lessons are at the beginning of the Adler course. In the lessons, the author is very thorough: he gives examples, explanations, and tastefully repeats them to aid in memorizing the content. Overall, it is obvious that the author spent a great amount of time producing this course. I thank the author for producing so many great lessons to aid in learning Latin! I can't wait for my next lesson!


Specific vocabulary is pronounced which is good for the beginning student.


This is great stuff. Especially if your in a Latin class, this will give you an edge over everyone else



From Iacobus Salve Molendenari vel Evan,

I've followed you and the Latinum project for some time now, but I wanted to put a note out there expressing my profound thanks for all that you do.

I've definitely neglected doing so for far too long (several years now, by my reckoning). I started following you as a supplement when I was taking Latin in college, unfortunately my university only offered two semesters of the Language, since then I have been in great part using your lessons, materials and ideas.

(I've purchased materials from your website before as well!) I do believe they have given me a far higher degree of fluency than I could have ever hoped to attain had I stuck with Wheelock's and college courses. As of a few weeks ago I am a first through fifth grade Latin teacher, here in the states that means 6-11 year old pupils.

I couldn't be happier with it, and it is in the largest part due to you and your lessons. Certainly I still have much to learn, but I'm learning more every day - the act of teaching is itself an amazing teacher!

Anyway, my profound thanks to you and all that you do - it really makes a difference, even if people like me wait a very long time to tell you so.


Gratias maximas tibi ago mi bone magister, Iacobus



From Magistra Pfau (YouTube) Magister, I owe you an enormous debt. Finding your work here is like stumbling upon an oasis in the desert. I actually found your work looking for the pronunciation of Psalm 23 to teach my young Latin students. I know only enough to help them with some of the most basic grammar and simple sentence translation but I am growing. After having listened to you for a week, I've acquired my first copy of the Orbis Pictus and will take your course. Praises are due to you as I cannot imagine the discipline and fortitude it has taken you to make this accessible to the world. Deus vobiscum, Magistra Pfau, Pennsylvania, US



From Sven H. (YouTube) Your YouTube channel is a far better resource in learning Latin than all the books I've tried (except "Asterix" :) - but that I could not understand because of failing with the other books.) Many, many

thanks for your good work and in echoing our cultural heritage in the present.


Conversational Latin Audio Course

By Michael Robinson on January 10, 2013, Filed in: Language | Recommendation | Review

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I enjoyed my single semester of Latin at university, and kept it up for maybe one more semester after that. The method I was using to learn (Wheelock’s) was very time intensive, and I soon found I had little time to maintain the meagre understanding I had attained, let alone study further.

What I needed was an audio course. I had used such a course before to learn a bit of Cantonese while living in Hong Kong. They can be very effective, and do not require hour upon hour of book-study.

Imagine my joy when I came across the Adler audio courses from Evan der Millner. I’ve listened to about half of the first lesson, and have enjoyed it so far. Evan has made most of his material available on Youtube, which is great because it gave me a chance to evaluate the quality before purchasing (not that the courses are expensive – a mere $4.99 US for 9 hours). He has done an amazing job, both in quality and quantity – Evan Der Millner’s Youtube index.

The first set of Evan’s Adler audio courses is available here: Adler – Latin Practical Grammar – Lessons. According to the description, the goal of the course is to get you to be able to read in Latin , and to think in Latin. This is something I want.

I’m interested in they way learning Latin will change my thought processes, and I want to gain a greater understanding of some of the ancient roots of Western civilization. I’d like to know why you’re interested in learning it too, please do let me know in the comments section.

I

started using Latinum in June, after taking a more traditional Latin course through the University of Wales. I did all right with that course, but I never felt really confident that I knew the language (even though I scored a 92% on the final test) I've been going through the lessons from Adler, and listening to the audio, and I now feel as if I'm learning the language in a way that will stay with me. There is a possibility that I'll get to teach Latin to grade school students in January, and I want to be prepared. It's been very helpful to listen to the language as I'm studying - I think that's what makes this work so well. I've gotten up to lesson 29 so far, and I had a friend who knows Latin well make a test for me up to that point, so I'm reviewing the audio whenever I can. Looking forward to continuing on with the next part of the course and listening to some of the additional audio selections. Thank you for all the work you've done!


From Karl's Blogspot:


Much fun will be had. I've been working hard on the Latinum material, and the constant practice with oral Latin is really helping. Things that I knew analytically in my previous Latin work are becoming second nature, almost fluent. What a good use for an ipod!



An Esperantist Studies Latin

by Robert L. Read


(Esperanto version follows.)


Subject to the limits of human frailty, I endeavor to extend my knowledge to encompass all that is worthy. Learning Esperanto was in important way-point on this journey, and now has led me into a new realm, the study of Latin.


I began to study Esperanto in about 2001. The first year, I studied about 30 minutes or more everyday, and by the end of that year I was quite conversational. By the end of the third year I could speak quite smoothly. Any errors in communication that I made could be easily resolved by asking questions. I was at this time functionally fluent, although at that time, as today, I often made grammatical mistakes, did not have the broadest vocabulary possible, and could only read Esperanto at one-fourth the rate I read my native English. Since that time, I have not studied or progressed much, although happily my skills have not decayed either---I can demonstrably begin speaking Esperanto flowingly at a moment's notice. There is a difference between knowing somthing in the head, an ephemeral and surface sort of knowing, and knowing something in the heart, a deep and permanent sort of knowing. My knowledge of Esperanto, incomplete and imperfect as it may be, is "in the heart".


One of the things that I have always valued about Esperanto is its propaedeutic effect---the idea that learning one language, and Esperanto in particular, assists with learning other languages.


This year, I have started learning Latin: to test this hypothesis, as a mental exercise, to be able to fully understand how Latin evolved into Spanish, and to access directly some of the best minds of the last two millennia.



I have now studied Latin enough to confirm, in the heart, some common head-knowledge.


Latin is rich, irregular, complicated, and ten times more difficult than Esperanto. An investment in studying Latin may be equally or more rewarding than an investment in Esperanto to a particular student, but I can assert with perfect and personal confidence that Esperanto is a better choice as an international aŭilliary language.


However, I prefer to emphasize the synergy of studying both, rather than their relative merits. The vocabulary and grammar of Esperanto overlap with Latin to such an extent that I submit that it is useful to think of Esperanto as a simplification of Latin. I know that this is not true phylogenetically. Esperanto is not an outgrowth of Latin, except in so far as its creator was influenced by languages that have all been deeply influecned by Latin, and by his boyhood study. This is common knowledge, but until I begain to study Latin, I did not fully realize how much they have in common.


It feels as if the vocabulary is 80% the same, and, significantly, this includes even the shortest, most common words in Esperanto, such as the affixes and prepositions. They also share these grammatical features:


Grammatical marking of part-of-speech allows both languages to celebrate a freedom of word order that Esperanto poets and Roman orators put to good use.

Once an English speaker has internalized the accusative in Esperanto or Latin, he or she knows it in the other. This is a slight hurdle in Esperanto, and I suspect for many students of Latin this similarly takes some time. Having crossed this obstacle in Esperanto, it seems completely natural to me in Latin.

The ablative in Latin is very similar to the advanced use of adverbial participles in Esperanto.

The use of compounding prepositions before adverbs and nouns is similar in both languages, though far more regular in Esperanto.

Latin utilizes at least some of the word-building (agglutination) that is common to Esperanto, including the use of enclitics.

My study plan for Latin is similar to my previous study plan for Esperanto: to study about 30 minutes, but at least 15, every day. I am working through the popular Wheelock's Latin textbook. I conscientiously do all the exercises there and in the Workbook for Wheelock's Latin as I complete each chapter.


Critically, I also listen to Latinum, a huge collection of audio files in Latin. While exercising and in the few minutes between interruptions that come to my desk at work, I probably listen to Latinum about 45 minutes every day on average, though often passively, without giving it my full attention. Evan der Millner has given a wonderful gift to the world in creating Latinum. Given the large number of Esperanto radio broadcasts, there is much more audio material in Esperanto than in Latin, but I don't think anyone has taken the time to create and organize so useful an audio repository for learners as has magister der Millner.


Our work placing Esperanto works at Project Gutenberg may hopefully enjoy the success that has Latinum, a success which can be considered a justification of those of you who have worked to put audio books in Esperanto on the internet, such as the six availabe at LibriVox.


I have currently completed Chapter 7 (out of 40!) in Wheelock, after about six weeks of study. By way of comparison, I completed my first Esperanto textbook (Conroy) in 30 days.


Frankly, I love studying Latin. (Of course, I love studying everything---I seem to be happily addicted to learning, or, if you are uncharitable, the illusory trappings of learning.) So far this small study of Latin has taught me history, deepened my understanding of English, given me some appreciation of Latin poetry, and allowed me to look at a Latin text or motto and figure out its subject, if not its subtlety. I value these benefits highly.


I can pronounce, but not converse in, Latin today. After studying Esperanto for six weeks I could hold meaningful if faltering conversations, laugh at jokes in Esperanto, and terrify myself by rereading Don Harlow's translation into Esperanto of Lovecraft's little horrow gem, Pickman's Model.


Life is short and forces us to choose the order in which we we study our subjects, even if an optimist need never admit he or she is completely abandoing one. If you can pardon my anthropomorphism, languages, therefore, compete for the affection and attention of their students. Perhaps, for children of a certain age in a school curriculum, this competition is unavoidable, because they must, as a practical matter, decide with language to study first. But I prefer to think of the two languages as collaborators, rather than competitors. I hope this to be true of any two related subjects, but I am certain it is true of Latin and Esperanto. Learning Esperanto has given me confidence in my ability, and instigated in me a previously unfelt desire, to learn Latin. At the end of this year we will have one single isolated and subjective datum about the extent to which learning Esperanto first has made learning Latin easier.


* * *


(Angla versio de supre.)


Ĝis la limojn de la homa menso, mi penas enmensigi la tutaĵon de inda homa scio. Lernado de Esperanto estis grava vojmeza punkto apud mia pado, kaj nun kondukas min al nova fako, tiu de la Latian lingvo.


Mi ekstudis E-on proksimume en 2001. La unua jaro, mi studis dum 30 minutoj aŭ pli ĉiutage, kaj post tiu jaro mi kapablas konversi glate. Iujn mankojn, kiujn mi havas, mi povas plenigi per demandoj. Mi tiam estis funkciante flue, malgraŭ ke tiam, kiel nun, mi ofte fuŝis gramatikajn aferojn, ne havis tre vastan vortŝtokon, kaj povas legi per nur kvadrono de la rapideco per kiu mi legas mian denaskan lingvon, la anglan. Ekde tiam, mi ne studis aŭ progresis multe, tamen feliĉe mi ne malkapabliĝis---mi povas elmontri ekparoli la internacian lingvon glate je iu ajn momento. Estas diferenco inter scio de la kapo, kiu estas maldurema kaj surfacema, kaj ĝisoste scio de la koro, kiu estas profunda kaj ĉiamdaŭra. Mia scio de Esperanto, malperfekta kaj mal-vastega, estas ĝiskora.


Inter al benoj de Esperanto estas la propaedeŭtika efiko---la ideo ke studado de unu lingvo, kaj Esperanto precipe, helpas lernadon de aliaj lingvoj.


Ĉijare, mi ekstudis la latinan lingvon: por provi tiun hipotezion, por ekzerci la menson, por profunde kompreni la evoluon de latina al la hispanon, kaj por esti tuŝota rekte per iom da la plej bonaj mensaj de la lastaj du miljaroj.


Mi nun studis la latinan sufiĉe por konfirmi, ĝiskore, tion, kion oni ofte diras per kapo-scio.


La latita lingvo estas riĉa, malregulema, malsimpla, kaj dekoble pli malfacila ol Esperanto. Investo en studado de la latinan eble estas egvale aŭ pli valora ol investo en Esperanto por dependente de la studento, tamen mi asertas per persona kaj perfekto memfido ke Esperanto estas plibona elekto por internacia interkomunikado.


Malgraŭ tio, mi preferas emfazi la sinergion inter la du lingvo, ol iliajn konkursantajn meritojn. La vortŝtoko kaj gramatiko de la du intersektas sufiĉe ke oni povas pripensi E-on kiel simpla versio de la latinan. Mi scias ke ĉi tio ne veras filogeneze. Esperanto ne estas ido de la latinan, krom ke la lingvo de Romo influis la kreinton de E-on per la latinidaj lingvoj, kaj per lia rekta studado de ĝin kiam junulo. Ĉi tiu estas vaste konata, sed antaŭ mi ekstudas la latinan, mi ne plene komprenis kiom, tiom ili similas.


Ŝajnas ke la vortŝtoko estas 80% sama, kaj, tre grave, tiu inkludas la plej mallongajn kaj plej uzatajn vortojn de Esperanto, ekzemple la afiksoj kaj prepoziciojn. Ili ankaŭ samas gramatike:


Signado de tipo de vorto permesas ambaŭ ĝui liberon de vort-ordo ke poetaj de Esperanto kaj oratoroj romaj bone uzis.

Post parolanto de la angla bone komprenas la akuzativon en unu, ne devas lerni ĝin en la alio. Ŝajnis tute natura al mi en la latinan.

La ablativo en latino similas al la averba uzado de participioj en e-o.

Vortkonstruado per prepozicioj antaŭ adverboj kaj substantivoj similas en la du (krome, estas multe pli laŭ-regula en Esperanto.)

La latina uzas almenaŭ parton de la vortkonstruado kiu kutimas en Esperanto, inkluzive de la uzado de enklitikoj.

Mia plano por studado de la latina similas al mia antaŭa studado por Esperanto: mi intencas studi dum 30 minutoj, kaj almenaŭ dum 15, ĉiutage. Mi studas per la populara lernolibro Wheelock's Latin. Mi diligente faras ĉiujn de la ekzercoj en tiu kaj en la pratik-libro Workbook for Wheelock's Latin antaŭ mi finfinis ĉiujn ĉapitrojn.


Grave, mi ankaŭ aŭskultas al Latinum, grandega aro de audeblaj dosieroj en la latina. Dum mi kuradas kaj dum malmultaj minutoj inter interrompo ĉe mia dunga skribtablo, mi verŝajne aŭskultas al Latinum 45 minutoj ĉiutage, tamen ofte malaktive. Eva der Millner donacis mirinda donacon al la mondo pro krei Latinum-on. Pro grandega numero de radiaj elsendoj en Esperanto, estas pli da aŭskultebla materialo en Esperanto ol en la latina, tamen mi pensas ke neniu elspezis la tempon por krei kaj organizi kian utilan rimedaron por lernantoj, tian faris "magister" Evan Der Millner.


Nia laboro por enmeti Esperantajn tekstojn ĉe Projekto Gutenbergo espereble same sukcesos kiel Latinum, sukceso kia, tia valorigas laborantojn por havebligi aud-librojn en Esperanto interrete, ekzemple la ses ĉe LibriVox.


Mi nun studis ĝis ĉapitro 7 (el 40!) en Wheelock, post ses semajnoj de studo. Kompare de Esperanto, ĝi progresas malrapide: mi finis mian unuan tutan lernolibron de Esperanto (Conroj) en 30 tagoj.


Elkore, mi amas studi la latinan. (Ja vere, mi amas studi ĉion---verŝajne lernado maniuligas min, aŭ, se vi estas malĝentila, la iluzio kaj garnitaro de lernado fie allogas min.) Ĝis nun mia studeto de la latina lingvo instruis al mi historion, plibonigis mian komprenon de la angla, donis al mi estimon de poezio latina, kaj permesis min legi latinan tekston aŭ moton kaj elpensi la temon, se ne la tutan signifon. Mi ŝatas tiujn benojn.


Mi povas elparoli, sed ne konversi, per la latinan hodiaŭ. Ses semajne post ekstudi E-on mi povas konversi, tre fuŝeme, kun signifo, ridi pro ŝercoj en E-o, kaj timigi min per relegado de elangliĝo far Don Harlow de juveleto de hororo far Lovecraft, Pickman's Model.


Vivo estas mallonga kaj pelas nin elekti ordon per kiu ne studas niajn interesojn, eĉ se optimistulo neniam devas konfesi ke li aŭ ŝi ĉiame forlasis unu el ili. Bonvole pardonu mi pro antroformigo de lingvoj, tamen lingvoj, tial, konkursas por la atento kaj ŝato de siaj studentoj. Eble, por infanoj en lerneja kursaro, tia konkurso estas nepra, ĉar ili devas elekti kiun, tiun por studi. Tamen mi preferas pensi ke la du lingvoj estas kunlaborantoj, anstataŭ konkursantoj. Mi esperas ke ĉi tiu estas vera por iu ajn du similaj kampoj aŭ fakoj de studado, tamen mi certas ke estas vera por la latinan kaj la internacian lingvojn. Lernado de Esperanto donis al mi memfido pri mia kapablo, kaj instigis en mi antaŭe nekonata deziron, por lerni la latinan. Je la fino de la jaro ni havos unuopan, izolatan, kaj subjektivan dateneron pri kiom la antaŭa studado de Esperanto helpas la lernadon de la latina lingvo.



onya_post:

Seastar,

I have Song School Latin - we use it, it is a fine program. It isn't gong to get you very far however, You have to ask what is your ultimate goal for Latin? We use Evan Millner's products https://sites.google.com/site/janualinguae/. It is much better and has tons more material than when we first started using the site 6 years ago. My 17 y/o can speak Latin fluently. That is what I wanted. He does not need to do translation - he just reads it. I am not that good.


We are in the process of creating a full Latin curriculum using Little Reader. I'd been waiting for v3 to come out so I could start. We are starting with - The Orbis Sensualium Pictus. That is free online - I think Evan's reading of it the first thing I am doing is putting all vocabulary in that fits with the LR format. Then I'll create files that will tie it all together. From there we'll move to either Dooge or Alder. My oldest did both.


We also used a couple other programs before I found Latinum - but Evan picked out the best resources for getting as close to Latin Immersion as possible. He also has a free video course on youtube that you can use to teach yourself . A book I have used alot in the beginning was Demystifying Latin. But Evan has so many materials and they are so cheap and thorough that you don't really need it.


Steffen Pielstrom (reposted from Linked In, Sept 2015)

Thank you for your great You-Tube materials! Helped me a lot to get an impression of reconstructed pronunciation in Latin. Vale.


Aurelian (reposted from YouTube, Sept 2015)

Salve Molendenari vel Evan,

I've followed you and the Latinum project for some time now, but I wanted to put a note out there expressing my profound thanks for all that you do. I've definitely neglected doing so for far too long (several years now, by my reckoning). I started following you as a supplement when I was taking Latin in college, unfortunately my university only offered two semesters of the Language, since then I have been in great part using your lessons, materials and ideas.(I've purchased materials from your website before as well!) I do believe they have given me a far higher degree of fluency than I could have ever hoped to attain had I stuck with Wheelock's and college courses. As of a few weeks ago I am a first through fifth grade Latin teacher, here in the states that means 6-11 year old pupils. I couldn't be happier with it, and it is in the largest part due to you and your lessons. Certainly I still have much to learn, but I'm learning more every day - the act of teaching is itself an amazing teacher! Anyway, my profound thanks to you and all that you do - it really makes a difference, even if people like me wait a very long time to tell you so.

Gratias maximas tibi ago mi bone magister,

Iacobus


Chris Eden (reposted from YouTube, Oct 2015)

All this aural material, in Latin, on YouTube, shows the immense dedication of Evan der Millner to the students of living Latin. This material, to me, has been invaluable in helping me to progress in Latin and I can only thank him, yet again, for all the effort he has put into developing this precious resource. Volo semper ut Evan der Millner floreat in vita sua et saeculo saeculorum! gratias sibi ago.


Deanna P (reposted from YouTube, Oct 2015)

Magister, I owe you an enormous debt. Finding your work here is like stumbling upon an oasis in the desert. I actually found your work looking for the pronunciation of Psalm 23 to teach my young Latin students. I know only enough to help them with some of the most basic grammar and simple sentence translation but I am growing. After having listened to you for a week, I've acquired my first copy of the Orbis Pictus and will take your course. Praises are due to you as I cannot imagine the discipline and fortitude it has taken you to make this accessible to the world. Deus vobiscum, Magistra Pfau, Pennsylvania, US


Steve of NN, VA Mr. Millner has done amazing work creating and posting these audio materials online. His passion for and dedication to the Latin language really shine through. I still find it incredible that someone would take up such a task. If you have an interest in learning in Latin or at least wish to see it spared the fate of being a truly 'dead' language, start to use these materials.

This is a course intended for serious study, so you won't be able to just tune in and get something from it - a little preparation is necessary. The lectures follow the course laid out in the Adler textbook, so you must get the Adler textbook to make use of the lectures. The text is available for free from Google.

This is a superior resource - Latin teachers are hard to find in a lot of places; this podcast with the associated resources can actually teach you well enough to make up for the lack of a teacher provided you dedicate yourself to it. Bravo, Mr. Millner!


David FB I have been trying to learn Latin off and on for the last 20 years. There is no particular reason for wanting to do this, other than that the language appeals to me. Visiting Rome last year only intensified my desire to study it. Thus, this site was a godsend. It is, admittedly, not easy material. For those planning to use it, I recommend that they first get a copy of Adler's book, as well as the answer key -- they help immensely - (NOTE: the pdf is supplied in all the downloads)

The amount of work that is involved in setting up a site like this is amazing -- my experience with much less ambitious projects, only underscores my sense of awe at what Evan Millner has accomplished. I hope this project will continue to grow.


Mat: I used to listen to the Corderius and Comenius and do a dictation by pausing and listening over and over and over, then checking myself. Thanks to that I have gained considerable fluency.


Hurin: I have Adler, I do listen it every day, several times each lesson. I am currently on Pensum X. I've just discovered the William's dictionary - it's really great way to improve your every-day vocabulary. I think I will use the cards-method in order to memorize as much as I can.


sheremet (from his amazon review)I'd also recommend Adler's "Practical Latin Grammar," which is out of print, but nonetheless available on Google Books. Adler's textbook is especially good as a supplement to "Lingua Latina," since it eventually covers every important point of grammar, including complex subordination. It's focused on *conversational* Latin, which forces the student to generate and verbalize good Latin sentences from the very beginning. The entire book has been rendered into audio by Evan Millner. In this way, you're doing two things: you're practicing complex prose with proper reading skills with Orberg's book, and practicing listening and speaking Latin with Adler and Millner.

An article criticizing the typical Latin-teaching approaches mentioned something interesting and revealing: in the Renaissance, students were first taught conversational Latin for five or six years before ever cracking open some Caesar or Cicero. And only years later, perhaps, did they ever touch poetry. Doesn't this seem sensible? To truly understand a language, or even to simply be competent enough to read at a decent speed, from the start of a sentence to the end, without juggling endless case endings and objects in your mind, requires this kind of approach. Sure, if you're doing Latin academically, there may be no time -- you're expected to have decoded at least a couple of hundred of pages of Latin by the time you hit your Ph.D. stage, in some schools. But, if you're interested in doing well and improving every day, and visibly, for that matter, forget about Latin literature for as long as you can tolerate it, and start with the basics: easy reading, and conversation.


Caeser13 There's Latinum, which is just Latin readings. I usually fall asleep listening either to this, or to an audiobook from Latinum. Recently, it's been the Latin. It's a great resource.


paruos: Wow! Latinum is wonderful! Excelent!, that will certainly help me A LOT to make my Latin go forward according to what I wish


Todd: Several weeks ago I purchased the 'Audio Visual Latin' DVDs (1-3). I wanted to

let you know that I am really enjoying your videos- great job! I really appreciate your hard work.


Thanks for putting these videos together, you certainly have a talent for teaching, not only am I learning but I am also amused at your creativity, and of course, by your friend the dinosaur!


C_Hook This is an excellent supplement (or alternative) to reading-only Latin learning approaches. I've taken several years of Latin in college, but felt that my fluency had plateaued. I was looking for something that would bring in other learning modes (listening and speaking) instead of the traditional reading-only method. Latinum was exactly what I was looking for and it has helped me move forward. Plus, it is something I can do while I'm driving or taking a walk. I really appreciate all the hard work it must have taken to put this together


hippodrome: I found this course very easy to use and follow. The lessons are clear and concise. All in all, a great tool to use in the learning of Latin.


Nick: I listen to the audio from time to time to improve my pronunciation and listening skills.

Right now, I am indebted to you for your recommendation (Adler's grammar), and after I finish the book I would like to dedicate more time to the recordings.

Along with Adler's "Practical Grammar" and Latinum, I use the word study tool on perseus.tufts.edu, Nodictionaries.com, Wiktionary (on occasion), and the Latin Forum.

Before Adler's grammar, I used a decent (but that's it) textbook in an inferior curriculum, and considered buying the second book in that series for self-study.

Your dedication to teaching people worldwide Latin is amazing! I am so impressed with your work! I can't even begin to count how many hours you've spent creating all these wonderful episodes. I love the innovative method you use to teach, stressing the development of good vocabulary before tackling grammar...the opposite of most text books!

Keep up the good work, and I'll be sure to keep following your episodes!


Senorsmile: I have had a love for the Latin language since I was 11. I am now 25 and have learned several languages to varying degrees of fluency (from advanced beginner to basic fluency). Latin, however, the first language I fell in love with, has forever eluded my grasp. I believe part of the reason for this is the lack of people to speak it with and a lack of good resources. I believe both of these are just excuses though. There are plenty of people, especially via the internet, with whom to speak. And there are enough resources out there to become fluent.

So, I intend to use some of the methods that I have picked up from these forums and other places and apply these to the resources that I have at my disposal. I am starting over from the beginning. Thanks to Latinum, we have what appears to be a huge resource available to anyone with an internet connection.


Nikolaus: Latinum is a good course. If you want a really good free textbook, there is Adler's Grammar and its answer key.

Adler's grammar starts from the very beginning, and builds up grammatical skills gradually, and vocabulary is introduced VERY slowly. The result is that you should have a solid foundation on grammar, but will rely on dictionaries for a while. (Which is why I recommend listening to the Vestibulum and Orbis alongside Adler -EM)


Hurin:

I've downloaded Adler materials, and Audio Vocabulary as whole.

I do listen it every day, several times each lesson. I am currently on Pensum X


porodzilus

I learned Latin in school. After several years out I realized I had forgotten how to say anything in Latin. What I did remember was the endings and just enough grammar. Now I use Latinum . The rapid vocabulary drills along with study of grammar in reading has lead to a dramatic increase in my ability in just 3 months.

What happened? We stopped teaching it as a language. We started teaching it as a code to be read and to make perfect translations. You need to get the classroom engaged in speaking the language and hearing it. There is no need to always memorize 4 principal parts when you can hear the vowel systems. Latin still requires a lot of grammar and translation drills. But I think in the second year of instruction you should start to really hear it a lot more.

Students will make mistakes. But hearing the correct way over and over will eventually correct them.and by learning a language with the ear you will learn to understand it faster as your ear forces you to interpret it faster.

Faster translations = more fun. fix mistakes later, but you will always be sure of what you do know if you are learning it by ear.

This is well-suited to the autodidact.

Non scholae sed vitae discimus: We

learn, not for school, but for life.


This Adler course is extraordinary if you want to become fluent in latin. This takes about 500 days. I'm currently half-way. It's a living language approach based upon an ingenious textbook that is available for free from Google Books. Evan Millner has spent hundreds of hours creating these meticulous recordings. Also offered are hundreds of recitations by other scholars. If you are interested in Classics, this is the way to learn Latin. These recordings will endure for decades. Five Caesars (highest rating)!!!!!!

This course is a great tool to assist you in learning Latin. Being able to hear spoken Latin really helps the learning process.

As a beginning self taught Latin student I must say this is a wonderful tool. If you email Evan, who put this whole thing together, he will respond quickly and seems very friendly. Excellent tool for anyone wanting to learn Latin on their own and many others too.

My Latin was absolutely terrible before I tried this. I'm still learning and I can't wait to learn more!!

jim!!!! Latinum is a rare gem of a site for learning Latin. It is a phenomenal compilation of many drill podcasts. You must go through Adler methodically as suggested by the creator/developer. Exercise patience with Latin as it is different from other languages! It's not an overnight achievement! It will come in time and so you will have to go through the work patiently. Overall it is worth it. Get a tutor and you'll pay through the nose! Thank you Latinum!


Absolutely wonderful! Some of us on You-Tube are trying to do something similar with Ancient Greek, but yours is more complete and systematic than anything we have so far. Keep it up. The fact that someone can simply watch your videos and really improve their Latin is fantastic. That you make this free for all is exactly what You Tube is all about. May God continue to bless your efforts. As we, your Greek brethren say, ευχαριστω σοι. 


Review of Adler's textbook at Google Books

The most detailed and complete work concerning how to learn the Latin language ever compiled. With this, if you could actually read it all, you would most definitely become fluent. Best of all the entire book is in audio courtesy of the Latinum. Which helps learning by the ear. With all this book's exercises in speaking and conversation it emphasizes learning to speak the language rather than just reading it, which is a plus. In my opinion this text book should be standard or at least a little more credited for all it's work.


Quasus: Adler's A Practical Grammar of the Latin Language can be of special interest for you because it teaches to use the language actively. And if you decide on it, Latinum can prove very profitable. Adler's A Practical Grammar of the Latin Language is in English and is not subject to copyright any longer. Many claim that it's the best textbook that has ever existed.


Matthaeus: Adler's book is really the best out there for practical purposes mostly, even though it dates from the mid-nineteenth century; it even includes a key to the grammar exercises. Betake yourself to Latinum and download it. Thanks to that website I have tremendously increased my vocabulary and speaking skills. Utinam aliquem latine loquentem invenirem.

This really gave me an impetus to study further. Grammar, colloquial, spoken Latin, and original classical quotations in audio form are all included. The textbook used may be somewhat outdated (1858), but don't let that distract you.

I've used the famous Latinum course, which helped greatly with grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. It uses an old textbook, but it's worth the trouble if you're serious about learning.