Spring 2020


Calculus II Tutorial (MATH 12560 - 21)

Calculus II is a second-semester calculus course designed for students in science and engineering. Topics include sets, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and applications. Also covered are transcendental functions and their inverses, infinite sequences and series, parameterized curves in the plane, and polar coordinates

Tutorial is designed to perfect problem-solving skills in a smaller group setting.

Office Hours: Tuesday 4-6pm in Hurley 153 (Math Help Room)

Kaneb Center Workshops

Do you ever wonder how to teach a diverse group of learners and still meet your curriculum requirements? Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a framework to improve and optimize teaching and learning for all people based on scientific insights into how humans learn. This workshop will prepare you to implement UDL in your classroom, providing more flexibility and fewer barriers to learning.

Challenging students to think logically and analytically is not an easy task. In this workshop, we will develop practical tools for engaging your students in critical thought. A wide range of topics will be covered from the use of appropriate leading questions to a draft your own problem set in order to stimulate critical thinking.

Interested in creating a course from scratch? In this interactive workshop, you will learn and apply strategies for effective course design. Topics include goal-setting and assignment creation. You will leave with a preliminary course outline.


Past Teaching Assignments


UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME

    • MATH 14360 | Calculus B for the Life and Social Sciences (Online)

Summer 2019, Primary InstructorSummer 2018, Primary Instructor
A 4 credit course, Calc B is a second-semester calculus course designed for biology and social science majors. It is required for all premedical students. Mathematics plays a prominent role in the understanding of complex systems in modern biology and social science. This course aims to develop basic mathematical literacy in students for this modern era. Students will acquire skills needed for a quantitative approach to scientific problems and the mathematics needed to study change in a quantity. Topics include integration techniques, solution of differential equations, geometric series, Taylor series and their applications to physics, geometry and ecology. Pre-requisites: First semester calculus or freshmen calculus.
Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.
    • MATH 10560 | Calculus II

Spring 2018, Primary InstructorSpring 2017, Primary Instructor
A 4 credit course, Calc II is a second-semester calculus course designed for students in science and engineering. Topics include sets, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and applications. Also covered are transcendental functions and their inverses, infinite sequences and series, parameterized curves in the plane, and polar coordinates.
    • Seminar of Undergraduate Mathematical Research (SUMR) | Computational Algebraic Geometry

Summer 2017, Primary Instructor
The SUMR is a two-year enrichment program for junior and senior honors students who intend to do post-graduate work in the mathematical sciences. Its goal is to provide an especially strong mathematical foundation to participants through graduate-level coursework and small group reading courses.
I facilitated an 8-week graduate-level seminar on Computational Algebraic Geometry and Gröbner Bases using Ideals Varieties and Algorithms by Cox, Little, and O’Shea.

KANEB CENTER WORKSHOPS

Fall 2019

This four-part workshop series introduces and develops the fundamental skills of effective teaching, including communicating expectations, facilitating a class, grading, and teaching critical thinking skills. This will give first-time and early TAs a solid foundation for successful teaching in graduate school and beyond.
Have you ever wondered: What does it mean to "flip" a class? Is it effective? This workshop will discuss the effectiveness of a flipped classroom and offer tools for content and presentation.
Interested in creating a course from scratch? At this intensive all-day workshop, you will learn and apply strategies for effective course design. Presentations on topics including goal-setting, creating assignments, writing a syllabus, and lesson planning will be interspersed with work time so that you will leave with a syllabus and other materials for your new course.


CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY


Supplemental Workshops at Cal Poly are 1 credit courses designed to supplement existing math and science courses. Guided by trained peer facilitators, enrolled students participate in discussions, compare notes, develop study strategies and challenge their understanding with practice exams, worksheets, and more.
    • Real Analysis Supplemental Workshop

Winter 2014, Facilitator
    • Calculus Supplemental Workshop

Spring 2014, FacilitatorFall 2013, FacilitatorSpring 2013, FacilitatorWinter 2013, Facilitator