This Week...


OCTOBER 17th

Periodic Table of the Elements

The Element Song:

https://www.google.com/search?q=the+element+song&rlz=1C5CHFA_enUS740US740&oq=the+element+song&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.6024j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

NEW SONG

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7o4uDXft_pU&list=PL1WEPkIWqheP62RcKJ2Z3ISGb-33sMa9E&index=5

Logic of the Periodic Table

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgu5jkJVFWA


Building a Periodic Table Activity Part 1

Home Learning

Text p.340 #1-9



OCTOBER 13th

Half Life Lab

Isotopes and Radiation


OCTOBER 11th

TEST!!!


October 9th

Create foldable study guide

Take practice test - grade & review

For your review:

Chapter 14 Study Guide Sample Test Questions

Multiple Choice

Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

____ 1. What do we call the tiny core at the center of an atom, containing most of the atom’s mass and all of its

positive charge?

a. Electron

b. Neutron

c. Proton

d. Nucleus

____ 2. The "building blocks" of matter are:

a. electrons.

b. atoms and molecules.

c. found only in the plasma state.

d. as of yet undiscovered.

____ 3. Atoms with the same atomic number but different atomic mass are called:

a. prototypes.

b. subtypes.

c. isotopes.

d. ions.

____ 4. What is the fundamental property of matter that can either be positive or negative?

a. Charge

b. Mass

c. Magnetism

d. Gravity

____ 5. Protons and neutrons in the nucleus are held together by:

a. gravity.

b. electromagnetic force.

c. the strong nuclear force.

d. the weak force

____ 6. Compared to protons, electrons have:

a. much smaller mass and opposite charge.

b. about the same mass and opposite charge.

c. much larger mass and the same charge.

d. much larger mass and opposite charge.

____ 7. The ____ is one kind of particle that makes up the atom and carries a positive charge.

a. electron

b. proton

c. neutron

d. plasma

____ 8. Atomic number is:

a. the number of electrons and protons in an atom.

b. the number of neutrons and protons in an atom.

c. the number of electrons in an atom.

d. the number of protons in an atom.

Name: ________________________ ID: A

2

____ 9. Electrons are bound to the nucleus by:

a. gravity.

b. electromagnetic force.

c. the strong nuclear force.

d. the weak force.

____ 10. A particle with zero charge found in the nucleus of an atom is called a(n):

a. electron.

b. proton.

c. neutron.

d. positron

____ 11. The charge on a proton is:

a. +1e

b. +2e

c. -1e

d. zero

____ 12. The mass of an electron is about:

a. 1800 times heavier than a proton.

b. 1800 times lighter than a proton.

c. 10,000 times heavier than a proton.

d. 10,000 times lighter than a proton.

____ 13. The mass of an atom is determined mainly by the:

a. mass of the neutrons.

b. mass of the neutrons and protons.

c. mass of the electrons.

d. mass of the electrons and neutrons.

____ 14. The letter e represents the elementary charge. In normal matter, the charge that would not be found is:

a. +1e

b. +2e

c. +2.5e

d. -2e

____ 15. A common isotope of Carbon has an atomic number of 6 and a mass number of 13. How many neutrons are in

an atom of this isotope?

a. 6

b. 7

c. 12

d. 13

Name: ________________________ ID: A

3

____ 16. Do any of the atom diagrams below represent atoms of the same element?

a. No, they are all different elements.

b. Yes, atom A and atom B are the same element.

c. Yes, all of the atoms are the same element.

d. Yes, atom A and atom C are the same element.

____ 17. The charge on a complete atom is equal to:

a. the number of protons.

b. the number of electrons.

c. zero.

d. e.

____ 18. Which of the following is a TRUE statement about atoms?

a. All atoms of the same element have the same number of electrons, protons, and neutrons.

b. Atoms of different elements may have different numbers of protons in the nucleus.

c. All atoms of the same element have the same number of electrons and protons, but may

have different numbers of neutrons.

d. The number of neutrons in an atom is equal to the number of protons.

Figure 14-1A

____ 19. Which of the reactions shown in Figure 14-1A illustrates beta decay?

a. A

b. B

c. C

d. None of the above

Name: ________________________ ID: A

4

____ 20. According to Figure 14-1A, which of the following statements is true of gamma radiation?

a. It is a form of pure energy.

b. It is a high energy electron.

c. It is a nucleus of a helium atom.

d. All of the above

____ 21. In Rutherford’s gold foil experiment, he bombarded gold foil with helium ions. Which type of radioactivity

shown in Figure 14-1A was responsible for creating the helium ions?

a. Alpha decay

b. Beta decay

c. Gamma decay

d. None of the above

____ 22. The diagrams below, in which arrows indicate the direction of movement, represent charged particles placed

near one another. The diagram that correctly represents the motion of the charged particles is:

a. 1

b. 2

c. 3

d. 4

____ 23. A charged particle that accounts for nearly half the mass of an atom is the:

a. electron.

b. neutron.

c. proton.

d. positron.

____ 24. Atoms of the same element may contain:

a. the same number of neutrons but a different number of protons.

b. the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons.

c. a different number of protons and a different number of neutrons.

d. the same number of electrons but a different number of protons.

____ 25. Electrons with higher energy are located:

a. farther from the nucleus of the atom.

b. closer to the nucleus of the atom.

c. in the nucleus of the atom.

d. at lower levels of the atom.

Name: ________________________ ID: A

5

____ 26. Many models have been developed to explain the nature of atoms. The model that helped scientists to

understand energy levels of atoms was developed by:

a. Niels Bohr.

b. Albert Einstein.

c. Sir Isaac Newton.

d. Richard Feynman.

____ 27. An atom absorbs energy as its electrons:

a. move from a low energy level to a high energy level.

b. stay in a high energy level.

c. move from a high energy level to a low energy level.

d. stay in a low energy level.

____ 28. Why don’t all the electrons in an atom fall to the lowest energy level?

a. Electrons move so fast they quickly bounce out of the lowest energy level.

b. Gravity won’t allow it.

c. The lowest energy level can only hold 2 electrons.

d. The nucleus repels the electrons.

____ 29. The diagram below represents a spectrum. Each line is a different color of light. The bright colored lines

represent:

a. the diameter of several isotopes.

b. light of different energies from an element.

c. atoms that are radioactive.

d. values for the strong force for several isotopes.

Name: ________________________ ID: A

6

____ 30. The diagram below represents the electron energy levels for the first two levels of an atom. The dark circles

show a filled electron energy level.

The diagram that would best represent an atom whose nucleus contains 5 protons and 4 neutrons is:

a. a

b. b

c. c

d. d

IMPORTANT NOTE : Corrections to answer key we reviewed during class- Question 10 is C Question 23 is C

For question 16 refers to the relationship between the number of protons, neutrons and electrons.

Question 19 – Be able to identify different type of radiation based on illustrations.

Question 23 – will indicate that charge on left is from the nucleus and right is from the electron cloud.

Question 29 – you should be able to identify spectral lines and what they represent.

Question 30 – you should know how the energy levels fill up.

ALL QUESTIONS WILL ASSUME THE ATOMS ARE NEUTRAL – THAT THE NUMBER OF PROTONS AND ELECTRONS ARE THE SAME.

The test format is 20 matching and 10 multiple choice.

Good luck!





October 6th

Homework 14.1 Worksheets - Review & Grade

QUIZ 14.1

Vocabulary - Electrons p. 322-326

Energy Level Rules p.325

Copy Chart of Energy Levels Figure 14.14

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AFPfg0Como

Lab Half Life

GIZMOS Activity

Home Learning: p.327 1-8 and Vocabulary p. 330 1-12


OCTOBER 3rd

Atoms are constructed of two types of elementary particles: electrons and quarks.

Electrons occupy a space that surrounds an atom's nucleus. Each electron has an electrical charge of -1.

Quarks make up protons and neutrons, which, in turn, make up an atom's nucleus. Each proton and each neutron contains three quarks.

A quark is a fast-moving point of energy. There are several varieties of quarks. Protons and neutrons are composed of two types: up quarks and down quarks.

Each up quark has a charge of +2/3.

Each down quark has a charge of -1/3.

The sum of the charges of quarks that make up a nuclear particle determines its electrical charge.

Protons contain two up quarks and one down quark.

+2/3 +2/3 -1/3 = +1

Neutrons contain one up quark and two down quarks.

+2/3 -1/3 -1/3 = 0

The nucleus is held together by the "strong nuclear force," which is one of four fundamental forces (gravity and electromagnetism are two others). The strong force counteracts the tendency of the positively-charged protons to repel each other. It also holds together the quarks that make up the protons and neutrons.


CHAPTER 14 ATOMIC STRUCTURE

The first subatomic particle to be identified was the electron, in 1898. J.J. Thompson

Cathode Ray

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YHwMWcxeX8

1908 Ernest Rutherford discovered that atoms have a very dense nucleus, which contains protons.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pZj0u_XMbc

1932 James Chadwick discovered the neutron, another particle located within the nucleus.

And so scientists thought they had found the smallest atomic building blocks. This changed in 1963 when Murray Gell-Mann proposed his quark theory. Gell-Mann believed that each proton and each neutron is made up of three even smaller particles -- particles he named quarks.

It is now known that in each atom of carbon12, there are a set number of subatomic particles: six electrons, six protons, and six neutrons. The atom's nucleus and electrons are held together by the electromagnetic force -- the positive charges of the protons balances the negative charges of the electrons. Neutrons have no charge.


BOZEMAN PULLS IT TOGETHER

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thnDxFdkzZs


Homework: Hand out 14-1 Atoms & Isotopes and Structure of the Atom


Hhhhmmm - If Mrs. Sapp was going to surprise a class with a short quiz next class what might it look like?

1. Atoms are made of three basic components. Name these three particles.

2. One of two forces that hold atoms together is called _____________ ______________.

3. A particle with a negative charge was discovered by English physicist, __________________, and is called the __________________.

4. Several scientists, including Ernest Rutherford, performed an experiment that helped improve the model of atom by realizing the inner core of the atom housed most of the mass. This core has a special name, the _____________.

a) electron b) nucleus c) proton

5. The two particles that make up most of the mass of the atom are called the _____________ and the ________________.

a) proton, electron b) neutron, electron c) proton, neutron

6. Which particle occupies the space outside the nucleus, in a “cloud?”

7. The number of ______________ is different for each element and is known as the _______________ number.

9. The electric charge on an atom is neutral because the number of protons is the same as the number of ______________, and each of their individual charges cancel out.

10. _______________ are atoms of the same element with a different number of neutrons.

11. What does it mean when a nucleus is “stable?”

12. If a nucleus is unstable and breaks apart, it is called _________________.

13. What is alpha decay?

14. What is beta decay?

15. What is gamma decay?


(NOT TODAY BUT IF YOU WANT TO SEE WHAT IS COMING.... - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUhJL7o6_cA )




SEPTEMBER 28th

Early Release

TEST CHAPTER 10

No Homework




SEPTEMBER 26th

PROPERTIES OF SOLIDS

DEMO LABS DRY ICE

HOME LEARNING - STUDY FOR TEST CHAPTER 10


ANSWER KEY FOR Chapter 10 Assessment

Section 10.1

1. element

2. atom

3. compound

4. molecule

5. pure substance

6. mixture

7. homogeneous mixture

8. heterogeneous mixture

Section 10.2

9. Fahrenheit

10. Celsius

11. thermal energy

12. thermometer

13. absolute zero

14. Kelvin scale

Section 10.3

15. solid

16. liquid

17. gas

18. intermolecular

forces

19. melting point

20. boiling point

21. plasma

Concepts

Section 10.1

1. Brownian motion, the jerky movement of small particles like dust particles in the air, provides evidence that those particles are colliding with particles that are too small to see (atoms or molecules). The jerky motion is caused by the much smaller atoms and molecules in the air colliding with the larger dust particles.

2. An element is made up of only one type of atom. A compound is made of two or more elements chemically combined.

3. The two major categories of matter are pure substances and mixtures.

4. Heterogeneous mixtures: rocky road ice cream, salad, beef stew. Homogeneous mixtures: cola, lemonade, spring water

5. Elements are made of only one type of atom while compounds are made of two or more types of atoms, chemically combined into molecules.

6. An atom is the smallest particle of an element that retains the properties of that element. A molecule is made of two or more kinds of atoms and is the smallest particle of a compound that retains the properties of that compound.

Section 10.2 7. Answers are: a. A Celsius degree represents a greater change in temperature than a Fahrenheit. b. Celsius: freezing point = 0 °C, boiling point = 100 °C; Fahrenheit: freezing point = 32 °F, boiling point = 212 °F c. The Fahrenheit scale was established first and is still used in the U.S. The Celsius scale, which is a metric scale, is used in most other countries and has values (like 0 °C and 100 °C) which are easier to remember.

8. Tc = 9/5Tc + 32; Tc = 5/9(Tf – 32)

9. People cannot consistently and accurately distinguish between hot and cold. To be able to accurately measure temperatures, people need to use instruments that use a measurable quantity such as electrical resistance, color change or change in length to compare temperatures.

10. Answers are: a. They are the same. b. 0 °C is the freezing point and 100 °C is the boiling point of water on the Celsius scale. 273K is the freezing point and 373K is the boiling point of water on the Kelvin scale. c. The Kelvin scale is useful because it starts at absolute zero. A temperature in Kelvins measures the actual energy of molecules relative to zero energy. The Celsius scale is more commonly used and understood because it used by both scientists and regular people in most countries.

11. Absolute zero (0K; –273 °C) is the coldest temperature matter can get. The temperature 0 °C (273K) is when water freezes.

12. There is no practical limit to how high temperatures can get. Section 10.3

13. Intermolecular forces still exist in a liquid although they are weaker than in a solid. This prevents molecules from breaking completely apart, allowing the liquid to expand and fill its container like a gas.

14. A solid doesn’t flow because the molecules are locked into place by intermolecular forces. The molecules can vibrate in place, but cannot move around to allow the solid to flow like a liquid or gas.

15. Gases and liquids can flow.

16. Answers are: (A) solid: maintains its shape and volume (B) liquid: maintains volume, flows easily (C) gas: fils its container, flows easily

17. Sublimation is the process of a solid changing directly into a gas.

18. In a liquid, some of the molecules occasionally break free of the

intermolecular forces and escape into the air. This process is called

evaporation.

19. Plasmas have the highest thermal energy.

20. Plasmas are the most common phase of matter in the universe.

Problems

Section 10.1

1. First, I would strain the soup and sort the large particles. Next, I would use

filter paper to separate even smaller particles. Finally, I would boil the soup to

evaporate the water, leaving behind salt and other compounds. It would be

difficult to separate the compounds left behind.

2. I would boil the mixture and collect the water in a condenser. Sugar crystals

would be left behind.

Section 10.2

3. 37 °C

4. 253K

5. –173 °C

6. You should set it to about 230 degrees Celsius (exactly 232).

Section 10.3

7. Answers:

a. B–C

b. C–D

c. 40 °C

d. boil the liquid

8. Answers are:

a. solid

b. liquid

c. gas




SEPTEMBER 22nd

Once again - Who did their Explore Learning (GIZMOS) makeup homework?

Review homework Chapter 10 Section 2 & Question 5 10.1

Refer to Text p.240 - 244

PHASES OF MATTER

Chemical bonds bring atoms together to form molecules. A water molecule has 2 hydrogen atoms bonded with 1 oxygen atom.

Intermolecular force is the attraction of molecules to one another. All of the water molecules in a glass of water are bonded together by this weaker force.

Temperature affects intermolecular force because additional kinetic energy causes the molecules to break away from one another. So the state of matter for a substance is a competition between intermolecular force and temperature.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSD-mEHWAMk


Get ready for Phase change video & Demonstration with the handout

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JcDDzOID960


AND NOW - PLASMA!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVEGJZxglIg



Home Learning:

Text p.248 Vocabulary #1-21 Concepts #2,4,6 , 7, 19 p.249 Problems # 2, 6, 7 & 8


A Little Extra: What does an atom look like?



SEPTEMBER 19th

Who did their Explore Learning Homework?

STARTING CHAPTER 10

What is matter? What isn't?

ROMAN OUTLINE NOTES

Board Sample p.228

Nature of Matter

I. Matter is made up of tiny particles that are constantly in motion

A. Matter is anything that has mass and takes up space.

1. Democritus - idea that atoms are the smallest unit things are made of 430 BCE

2. John Dalton - rediscovers the idea of atoms making up substances

B. Brownian motion is the idea that all particles move in a jerky random way (as if they were being hit by other particles)

C. The relative mass or size of objects can affect the reaction to particle movement. If there is a large difference in the mass of two items the effect of particle movement of the smaller object on the larger is not as easily observed.

D. Matter is made up of atoms.

1. Albert Einstein used Brownian motion as evidence that collisions between the pollen particles and smaller particles supported the existence of atoms.

II. p. 229

III. p.230

IV. (See Graphic Organizer below MATTER)

VIDEO Above

Class Assignment - Highlight the answers to Section Review 10.1 1-4 in your notes answer 5 at the end of the notes.

Home Learning

Read Chapter 10 Section 2 Temperature p. 234-238 Answer Questions 1-9







September 7-17 HURRICANE DAYS


SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

Opener - Calculating DENSITY problems

LAB 3 Identifying substances using DENSITY

Home Learning:

Go to www.leahsapp.com

Follow the directions to enroll in Explore Learning - Complete the assigned activity (very easy!)

READ carefully and follow the directions!

If you have a problem doing this assignment email me at leahannsapp@gmail.com

DIRECTIONS TO ENROLL IN EXPLORE LEARNING GIZMOS

Enrolling at ExploreLearning.com

Follow these simple steps to enroll in your teacher’s class:

Step 1: Go to https://www.explorelearning.com

Step 2: Click on the “Enroll in a Class” button in the upper right hand corner of the web page.

Step 3: Type in your teacher’s class code: SEE YOUR CLASS PERIOD BELOW

Click “Continue” and follow the directions on the site to complete your enrollment.

Step 4: Write down your username and password and put this sheet in your class notebook.

username: first initial last name first 4 digits of your student ID

(lowercase! example - sam adams 0226771 would be sadams0226 )

password: make it the same as user name

Congratulations! Now that you’re enrolled, you can login anytime using just your username and password (no class code required).

PERIOD 1 enter GCLGPHQFWJ

PERIOD 3 enter 9RVX2BCLR5

PERIOD 5 enter H3FK49PZJT



AUGUST 31, 2017

Collect homework.

Prepare write up for Lab

Mass, Volume & Indirect Measurement of RICE

(The longest lab ever!)

Homework - Eat some rice and tell your family the average mass of a grain of rice.



AUGUST 29, 2017

HOME LEARNING

TEXT p. 8 # 1-10 p.12 #1-8 p. 17 # 1-6 OR p.26 & 27 Vocabulary #1-10 Problems #1-11

PHYSICAL SCIENCE TEXT BOOK LINK https://curiosityplace.schoolspecialty.com

USER NAME JMC2017

PASSWORD Paladins


Checking Journals, Folders & Questions 1-6 p.35

Quiz on Density

How to Write Up a Lab (Template)

Lab 1 - Water Cohesion

Home Learning (above)


FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 2017

BASELINE ASSESSMENT

Home Learning Due Date Postponed to Tuesday, August 29th


PHYSICAL SCIENCE TEXT BOOK LINK https://curiosityplace.schoolspecialty.com

USER NAME JMC2017

PASSWORD Paladins





WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23, 2017


What's the MATTER? ( Notes Chapter 2.1)

Like really, what is matter?

General Properties of Matter are MASS, VOLUME & DENSITY

Matter is -

Mass is -

SI unit of measurement

Weight v. Mass

Volume is -

Measurement methods

Relationship between mass & volume

QUESTIONS p.35 1-6

MEASUREMENT ACTIVITIES

Length

ACTIVITY 1

In teams of two, measure four objects to 0.5mm

Share your measurements with your table so everyone records 3 sets of measurements. The measurements may be different that is OK!

White gasket Red Gasket Black o-ring Black washer

ACTIVITY 2

Measure the volume of a liquid.

Measure the volume of a regular solid.


ACTIVITY 3

Measure the volume of an irregular solid object


HOME LEARNING:

  • You may use the online text to finish (or correct) any of the questions on page 35

AND

Make sure you know the definition and formula for density as well as the unit measure.

======================================================================================























Welcome Back to JMC for the 2017-18 School Year!

SUPPLIES FOR SCIENCE CLASS

REQUIRED:

pencils with erasers

blue or black ink pens

One highlighter

loose-leaf paper

ONE composition notebook (NOT SPIRAL!)

ONE 3 prong Duotang folder

Period 1 - BLUE

Period 3 - RED

Period 5 - GREEN

RECOMMENDED:

1 ruler (metric)

1 pack of colored pencils

scissors

3X5 index cards (To create flash cards to study)

graph paper (pad or loose-leaf)

pencil sharpener

glue stick

2 additional highlighters (different colors)

protractor

compass

scientific calculator

ATTENDANCE POLICY

Student attendance is very important to this class. If a student misses a class due to an absence, an excused attendance admit is necessary before make up work is accepted. Students have 2 class sessions to make up work missed due to an excused absence.

CLASSROOM RULES:

1. Come into Room 123 prepared to learn; with required materials, completed homework and an active mind.

2. Show respect for your own and other’s person, property and reputation.

3. Ask permission to leave your seat, to eat or drink , or to check a mobile device.

DISCIPLINE PLAN:

Verbal Redirection

Paragraph/Behavior Reflection

Phone Call Home

Detention

Conference

Referral


GRADING POLICY

Classwork 2 Grades

Homework 1 Grade

Quiz 3 Grades

Tests 4 Grades

Projects 3-8 Grades


8/21/17 Monday ECLIPSE DAY!


1. Who are the key players today?

The SUN / SOLAR SYSTEM

https://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question18.html

The Geometry of ORBITS

http://www.iceinspace.com.au/content/images/3e6caa2120ea2f3acfdff7dedc641de4.jpg

Moon Photobombing Earth (Have to hunt for it in gallery)

https://www.nasa.gov/content/eclipse-and-transit-videos

Eclipse Types

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxrLRbkOwKs


ACTIVITIES:

  • What questions do you have about the phenomenon known as an eclipse?


In your table group create a 90 - to 180 second explanation of the difference between a total, partial, annular and hybrid eclipse. You will have 15 minutes to prepare then you will PRESENT!



=========================================================================================

WHAT I NEED TO KNOW ABOUT YOU:

PAGE 1

NAME

DADESCHOOLS EMAIL

ACADEMIC STRENGTHS

ACADEMIC WEAKNESS

HIGH SCHOOLS YOU WILL BE APPLYING TO

COLLEGES THAT INTEREST YOU

CAREERS THAT INTEREST YOU


PAGE 2

WHAT ARE YOUR INTERESTS?

WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO?

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT TECHNOLOGY?

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT YOUR PHONE?


PAGE 3

MOST IMPORTANT THINGS FOR A GREAT CLASS ARE:

THINGS THAT MAKE A CLASS SOMETHING I WANT TO STAY HOME TO AVOID:


PAGE 4

LEARNING STYLES INVENTORY



HOME LEARNING:

  • Bring your supplies! Our first lab is Wednesday.
  • Signed Parent Information Slip



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AFPfg0Como

BOZEMAN ELECTRON CONFIGURATION