Learn about me

Background

I grew up in Glen Burnie, Maryland, and attended Solley Elementary School. Both of my parents are immigrants and came to the U.S. when they were 19 years old, and neither attended college, which is why I am a huge supporter of College and Career Readiness preparation and expanding our current program because, as a diverse county, we have many first-generation students who need additional support applying to colleges, trade schools, or just figuring out their future. 

Since my parents were immigrants, they worked six days a week to keep a roof over my head, and I am forever grateful for that. However, childcare was always a concern since they were always working, so I advocate for expanding our Pre-K 3 and 4 programs and offering childcare solutions for working parents. 

In elementary school, I was in ESOL for a few years, which at the time, made me feel isolated from my peers. This is why I want to explore ways we can reform our English secondary learner plans to ensure other non-native students don't experience that isolation. 

Growing up

In 5th grade, I applied to the IB MYP and STEM magnet programs and was waitlisted for both. A few weeks from the end of the school year, I found out I had gotten off the waitlist for IB and took that opportunity to go to Old Mill Middle North for middle school.

 I loved my two years at Old Mill and the IB program. In 8th grade, I moved to Severna Park, where I finished out at the Severna Park Middle. 

I then realized how inequitable funding affected student quality of life and education. At Severna Park, there were so many more resources and things accessible to me than at Old Mill. I knew something had to change.

Currently

When I got involved with my school's SGA freshman year, I had one goal: to make my school and community a better place! Since then, I have had the opportunity to expand upon that goal at the county and state levels. 

This year, my main goal has been to connect with SMOBS from across the state to learn what their counties have been doing to improve their student's quality of life and academic and social success. Now, I am ready to bring those changes to AACPS! 

I also want to use my skills as the current CRASC Secretary of Communication to increase transparency between the board and students by creating SMOB Advisory Councils, Monthly Newsletter, Holding Town Halls, and more.

My drive and why i am running for smob

As a child of two immigrants who moved to the United States at 19, I am acutely aware of the challenges that our first-generation families face. Growing up, my parents worked tirelessly, often for six days a week, to provide for our family and improve our living situation. I know firsthand how difficult it can be for working families to find adequate childcare, which is why I am passionate about expanding before and after-school care as well as Pre-K 3 and 4 programs. Early childhood education is crucial and sets the foundation for students' success. I also recognize that our county has a significant number of first-generation students who lack guidance on their future, which is why I plan to expand college and career readiness programs and ensure that every school has a dedicated counselor to guide students in planning their future. 

Moreover, I believe that it's essential to address the root causes of problems rather than merely finding solutions. Student wellness and mental health, for example, are critical areas where we need to focus on both. While reducing counselor-to-student ratios is vital, we must also understand why students are struggling with stress and anxiety and how we can help alleviate these issues. To that end, I am proposing homework-free weekends around SAT and ACT exam dates and college application deadlines, eliminating quarterly assessments for eligible students, and providing specific dates for subject tests to prevent students from feeling overwhelmed with multiple tests on the same day. 

Finally, we must ensure that our policies benefit all students, including those facing challenging circumstances. For example, teachers must follow the no-penalty policy for assessments submitted up to a week late. Many students have part-time jobs to support their families, battle mental health illnesses, or need a break. We must accommodate them to create a more equitable and inclusive education system.